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Old 01-30-2019, 07:17 PM
 
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Normally my dog doesn't mind walking in the snow. It's below 0 Fahrenheit right now though and she keeps lifting her paws like she doesn't want them in the snow. (I bought boots, which she is tolerating but this prompted my question.)
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Old 01-31-2019, 09:26 AM
 
Location: Idaho
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Yes! Might not be obvious to us humans when we wear thick-soled boots/shoes, but is a painful reality, (literally), to your dog. Listen to him/her.
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Old 01-31-2019, 10:28 AM
 
Location: Foreignorland 58 N, 17 E.
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Yep, just like sand is hotter when it's very warm No-one's going to burn their feet on a playa in winter.
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Old 01-31-2019, 02:12 PM
 
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No. It is not because snow is colder than air temperature. Solid and liqiud subatances conduct the heat much better gas substances. The air is in gas form so it does not conduct the heat as good as solid and liquid substances.

As for the sand example, it is not the hot air that makes sand hotter than itself, it is the sun. If sand was in the shade all day, it wouldn't be any hotter than air. If you put a temperature under sun at 35*C in summer, the temp will show 50*C because of sun. It was an illogical comparation.
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Old 01-31-2019, 02:34 PM
 
Location: Not far from Fairbanks, AK
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nikkaluokta View Post
No. It is not because snow is colder than air temperature. Solid and liqiud subatances conduct the heat much better gas substances. The air is in gas form so it does not conduct the heat as good as solid and liquid substances.

As for the sand example, it is not the hot air that makes sand hotter than itself, it is the sun. If sand was in the shade all day, it wouldn't be any hotter than air. If you put a temperature under sun at 35*C in summer, the temp will show 50*C because of sun. It was an illogical comparation.
Good points. Also, if the snow is deep enough it provides a good layer of insulation to the grass below (such as a lawn). Caribou often scrape the snow off the top of the ground to reach and eat the lichen below. My dog does the same to reach the grass on my lawn

By the way, a thick layer of snow provides a layer of insulation to the water and other house pipes underground. The surface of the snow my be close to the ambient temperature, but down below it is not.
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Old 01-31-2019, 02:44 PM
 
Location: Idaho
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nikkaluokta View Post
No. It is not because snow is colder than air temperature. Solid and liqiud subatances conduct the heat much better gas substances. The air is in gas form so it does not conduct the heat as good as solid and liquid substances.
Can't agree. The air temperature can certainly be colder than the ground underneath, be it soil, snow, or liquid water. And, air can certainly conduct heat, however, it is a very poor conductor, especially air with a low humidity. No disagreement that metals are a better conductor of heat, or liquids, but air can certainly conduct heat; just not very fast or efficiently.
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