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Old 06-07-2020, 11:14 PM
 
54 posts, read 33,202 times
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I think it would be cool if people gave a detailed description on what it feels like to live in certain climate zones. Im talking the way it looks, smells. feels, the sounds, etc.

ill start .Humid subtropical climate. Cfa

Summer:
- It is 32C on a summer evening in a park forest near the city. The humidity makes you start sweating before you even do anything. Every breeze is greatly appreciated and it cools the sweat on your body. You don't mind it. If you're not sweating, you're not living. The sun is still fairly high up and bright, accompanied by growing popcorn-like cumulus clouds dotting the vibrant blue sky. The trees are so massive the canopy eliminates the majority of the blue from your sight. The sky looks like its sparkling every time the sun breaks through the opening of the leaves dancing from the soft breezes.

You hear the sound of a wide river. The sunlight sparkling along the calm water.

You hear the crunch of twigs and leaves with every step you take.

The air is thick and heavy with the fragrance of plants. You hear the faint sound of bees and other insects humming and many types of birds singing sweet songs to each other high up in the canopy. You occasionally see a squirrel eating and running near you. You go to sit down you see bugs, ants and worms scattering. The forest is teeming with life in every square inch.

Night is finally approaching and as you leave the forest you see the sky again, On the right side, there is a convective thunderstorm developing and is approaching your area. The cumulus-turned-cumulonimbus cloud is dark grey and tall and you see a very faint strike of lightning on the bottom of it. The cloud takes up now half of the sky as you hear the first rumbles of distant thunder.

When you leave the forest you are atop a small hill . on the left side you see the massive sprawling skyline of a major city in the far distance, its hundreds of skyscrapers shining proudly above the sea of green.
(Humid Subtropical climate are home to probably most of the world's megacities (NYC, Shanghai, Pearl River China, Tokyo, New Delhi, etc) In fact the climate is home to more people than any other type (at least according to GeoDiode's youtube channel which I highly recommend.)) It looks like a sea of buildings from a helicopter view.

Anyway, The thunder gets louder and louder, to the point where it is shaking the ground beneath you. You can literally smell the rain and the energy of the storm approaching. Winds pick up and the temperature drops a couple degrees due to the sun being covered up and the winds picking up. The darkness consumes the entire area, uninterrupted occasionally by the streaks of lightning which are now all around you. A couple drops of rain fall and you don't notice, until a drop hits your head and your arm, then two, then 20. It is a torrential downpour within 30 seconds. The rain is loud and pounding.

The storm lasts for about 15-45 minutes, giving way to partly cloudy skies like it was before with even more humidity. The pungent and refreshing smell of rain is dominant for the rest of the evening

At night the skies are clear revealing the stars and the moon in full display. Mosquitoes reign supreme just about everywhere. It is very hard to keep them out of your home, even if there are screen doors on all windows. You see some fireflies twinkle near the ground around you.
The humidity feels like a light blanket all over your whole body. One would start to sweat a little bit even just after taking a shower. The fan in your room cools you and your room barely enough so you can fall asleep. The many various insect calls and sounds (for example: cicadas) provide a white noise to fall asleep to.
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Old 06-08-2020, 12:59 PM
 
Location: Top of the South, NZ
18,099 posts, read 15,111,303 times
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From a Cfb climate

Summer is quite variable from a rainfall perspective, so hard to define summer in terms of sight or smell.

The constants are that sun pretty much always feels hot, and the deafening shrill of cicadas.

Last edited by Joe90; 06-08-2020 at 01:41 PM..
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Old 06-08-2020, 01:04 PM
Status: "Dodging the rain.." (set 2 days ago)
 
Location: Sheffield, England
2,505 posts, read 545,302 times
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From a high latitude Cfb.

A shadowless land of gloom and mirk, with a claustraphobic low cloud and constant unremitting fine drizzle by day and night, ceaselessly for many a week. Very rarely, the odd glimpse of light with all the heat of a 3W energy saving light bulb appears behind the gloom, only to disappear once again as the pounding winds drive more cloud across the break. The temperature, much the same damp chilly 5-15 degrees every day of the year, bar the odd couple. Mist and fog so thick that sometimes the houses on the other side of the road are imperceptible. Fog and fumes especially mix to such a degree in high pressure that breathing is hard so you see many people wearing gas masks. There are puddles which haven't completely evaporated in as many as 150 years.
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Old 06-09-2020, 01:29 AM
 
Location: Downtown Phoenix, AZ
21,902 posts, read 8,543,779 times
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Very subtropical BWh

Spring, bright sunny, starts warm and finishes hot. Very dry

Summer, starts dry, sunny and blazing hot, then a couple weeks in (from Calendar summer, not from 6/1) the monsoon starts, which defines the season. Daily cloud build ups, increased humidity and almost daily chances of t-storms. Mornings stay very warm to hot.

Fall, dry sunny weather comes back, but turns cooler quickly as cold fronts can make it through again. October features warm to hot afternoons and cool to mild mornings. By November, afternoons are mild to warm and mornings are cool. Early December it starts to feel like winter, as 70s disappear, and mornings can see occasional frost. The winter rain season begins around Thanksgiving.

Winter, cloudiest time of the year and our second wet season. Mild to cool afternoons, warm during warm spells, but mornings are always chilly to cool, except for the tail end of the season (mid March). Every 4 years we can see a light freeze, but stays warm enough that we have commercial citrus here
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Old 06-09-2020, 11:54 PM
Status: "star trek fan" (set 10 days ago)
 
Location: Etobicoke
50 posts, read 11,241 times
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Humid Continental dfb

Spring, the budding of trees, the blooming of flowers and snow piles melting. Can be very short as April can be snowy and May getting warm spells.

Summer, warm to hot and humid. Lake breezes provide relief during hot spells as cooling make the beaches comfortable anytime during the season. Of course the water is always cold.

Fall, the transition of leaves changing colour, geese flying south and days getting shorter. The air is crisp and cool. The first frosts normally happen in October and the first flakes by early November.

Winter, the longest season. Cold, windy and snowy. Often cloudy especially in December. Deep freezes during cold snaps a fact. Blizzards with heavy accumulations a reality. Ponds are frozen ice thick enough for skating.
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Old 06-20-2020, 06:03 PM
 
Location: In transition to Rome, Italy
76 posts, read 16,535 times
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Living in Csa climate, in which I am currently moving but have already lived in the past.

Spring, the blooming of flowers along with the appearance of light green leaves on some plants embellishes the partly-evergreen Mediterranean flora, bringing its luxuriance back to its fullest. The climate varies greatly from year to year, but it generally follows a pleasant, variable trend. March generally features interchangeable weather, alternating mild to warm sunny days with cooler unstable days. April enjoys an abundance of sunny days in which by then, the sun is always warm, but also some days with some of the heaviest rains of the year, making the pleasant smell of Mediterranean vegetation invade the whole city. In May, the sun is stronger and stronger and you feel it beginning to settle for a long, hot summer. The smell of jasmines is everywhere in the city and by then, you enjoy every rain shower you get, knowing that the following three months will be virtually free of any.

Summers are always sunny and blazing hot. Every day there is a vibrant blue sky and the sun shines strongly from the early morning. You smell dried-out grass throughout the city and have to avoid going out in the hottest hours, in which a "siesta" is more than welcome.

Fall: The previous conditions carry through September, but in September occasional daily cloud build ups and chances of thunder-storms re-appear. Days remain very warm to hot, getting milder only towards the end of the month. In October, rainy days occur more regularly but the conditions that generally prevail are that of the typical "Ottobrata Romana", in which we enjoy so many glorious warm sunny days. November is often either very sunny with cool to mild mornings and mild to warm afternoons, or the rainiest month of the year, yet still mild. It often reaches those two opposites and I can't say exactly HOW it feels for that, but the warmth of the sun mixed with some autumn foliage prepares the Mediterranean flora to the following three winter months.

Winter, the Mediterranean sun is as pale as it gets, but never disappears and can always be as glorious: the periods dominated by the anticyclone remind you of how blessed you are to live in this climate. Whilst most of the Northern hemisphere is in the midst of their gloomy winter, you see a vibrant blue sky out, that might last for one day or even whole weeks before days with bad weather, so you go for a walk. The mild air in the shade alternates with the gentle warmth you feel under the sun. Of course we don't have that every single day, but we do often get anticyclonic occurrences for prolonged periods of time even in winter. This alternates with periods of mostly overcast weather, which generally comes along with even milder temperatures.
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Old 06-21-2020, 01:25 AM
 
54 posts, read 33,202 times
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Autumn (Alot of this applies to both Cfa and Dfa/b climates)

As the summer sun loses its strength and the nights get longer and colder, The trees all around begin to shed their leaves. In doing so they explode in a display of color that is almost unbelievable at times. All forests, entire rows of trees along highways painted in vibrant yellows, oranges and reds. Walking in a forest during this time almost feels magical, like youre in a fairy tale. A famous sound is the crunch of stepping on fallen autumn leaves. In some houses near large trees, the leaves cover the entire lawn. The days are still warm, but not hot. The decomposing autumn leaves give the air the signature earthy scent that autumn is known for. The nights are when you get the first tastes of cold. All the roofs are glazed with a fine white layer of frost when the sun comes up after a long night.

Later, on one very cold late evening you see small white specks falling from the sky. If you dont regularly check the forecast you are confused for about half a second as you dont know what it is because you havent seen it in so many months. But then it hits you. Snow has arrived. The first snow is romantic, beautiful and heart warming. Soothing even, if youre inside of course.

Winter

In Dfa/b climates you probably wont see grass for a while. With the avg temp in winter being below freezing, the snow that does fall stays there for many days, weeks and even months at a time without melting. If you saw a greyscale picture of a park or forest in a Continental winter, the colors wouldnt be that far off from the real thing.

The snow sparkles against the sunlight, especially if its new. It sometimes looks like fairy dust when the wind is blowing the new snow around.

In both Cfa and Dfa, You see dead grass and dead leafless trees, if it is not covered by snow. Lots of brown, muted yellows, and grey are what you see if its not a sunny day. The only green is from the evergreen pines.

The low temperatures of autumn and winter supresses all odors which makes the air smell like.....well.....nothing. The lack of any smell can be seen as refreshing or "clean" to people who live in bad smelling cities, and depressing for those who love the smell of nature. It gives the air of autumn and winter the signature "crisp", "fresh" or "clean" smell.

It is very important to get vitamin d at this time, otherwise winter can lead to depression and other health problems. Most vitamin d supplements are dirt cheap anyway (at least where I am) but many people forget about this essential nutrient.
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Old 06-21-2020, 02:37 AM
 
58 posts, read 8,656 times
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Darwin Australia 12.5*S. The Wiki entry ( I prefer the local Indigenous description of the seasons....
"Darwin has a tropical savanna climate (Köppen Aw) with distinct wet and dry seasons and the average maximum temperature is similar all year round. The dry season runs from about May to September, during which nearly every day is sunny, and afternoon relative humidity averages around 30%.The driest period of the year, seeing only approximately 5 mm (0.20 in) of monthly rainfall on average, is between May and September. In the coolest months of June and July, the daily minimum temperature may dip as low as 14 °C (57 °F), but very rarely lower, and a temperature lower than 10 °C (50 °F) has never been recorded in the city centre. Outer suburbs away from the coast, however, can occasionally record temperatures as low as 5 °C (41 °F) in the dry season. For a 147‑day period during the 2012 dry season, from 5 May to 29 September, Darwin recorded no precipitation whatsoever. Prolonged periods of no precipitation are common in the dry season in Northern Australia (particularly in the Northern Territory and northern regions of Western Australia), although a no-rainfall event of this extent is rare. The 3pm dewpoint average in the wet season is at around 24.0 °C (75.2 °F).[33]

Extreme temperatures at the Darwin Post Office Station have ranged from 40.4 °C (104.7 °F) on 17 October 1892 to 13.4 °C (56.1 °F) on 25 June 1891; while extreme temperatures at the Darwin Airport station (which is further from the coast and routinely records cooler temperatures than the post office station, which is in Darwin's CBD) have ranged from 38.9 °C (102.0 °F) on 18 October 1982 to 10.4 °C (50.7 °F) on 29 July 1942. The highest minimum temperature on record is 30.7 °C (87.3 °F) on 18 January 1928 for the post office station and 30.2 °C (86.4 °F) on 27 December 2019 for the airport station, while the lowest maximum temperature on record is 18.4 °C (65.1 °F) on 3 June 1904 for the post office station and 21.1 °C (70.0 °F) on 14 July 1968 for the airport station.

The wet season is associated with tropical cyclones and monsoon rains.[35] The majority of rainfall occurs between December and March (the southern hemisphere summer), when thunderstorms are common and afternoon relative humidity averages over 70 percent during the wettest months.[33] It does not rain every day during the wet season, but most days have plentiful cloud cover; January averages under 6 hours of bright sunshine daily. Darwin's highest Bureau of Meteorology verified daily rainfall total is 367.6 millimetres (14.47 in), which fell when Cyclone Carlos bore down on the Darwin area on 16 February 2011.[36] February 2011 was also Darwin's wettest month ever recorded, with 1,110.2 millimetres (43.71 in) recorded for the month at the airport.[33]

The hottest month is November, just before the onset of the main rain season. The heat index sometimes rises above 45 °C (113 °F), while the actual temperature is usually below 35 °C (95 °F), because of humidity levels that most would find uncomfortable. Because of its long dry season, Darwin has the second-highest average daily hours of sunshine (8.4) of any Australian capital, with the most sunshine from April to November; only Perth, Western Australia, averages more (8.8). The sun passes directly overhead in mid-October and mid-February.[37]

The average temperature of the sea ranges from 25.8 °C (78.4 °F) in July to 31.5 °C (88.7 °F) in December.[38]

Darwin occupies one of the most lightning-prone areas in Australia. On 31 January 2002 an early-morning squall line produced over 5,000 cloud-to-ground lightning strikes within a 60-kilometre (37 mi) radius of Darwin alone—about three times the amount of lightning that Perth, Western Australia, experiences on average in an entire year."

The Indigenous seasons and descriptions....
"The four seasons Summer, Autumn, Winter and Spring are not relevant in the Top End. To Non-Aboriginal (Balanda) people usually only two seasons are referred to - the Wet (November to April) and the Dry (May to October), with an acknowledgement of the 'Build-Up' which is late dry early wet. And if you are a fisherman there is the 'Run-Off'.

Six Seasons! Aboriginal people (Bininj) have lived outdoors for thousands of years and harmonize their lives with seasonal movements. They didn't use the Gregorian calendar to mark the start of a new season, they observed the flowering and fruiting of plants and linked their foraging and hunting activities to these. For example, when the Darwin Woolybutt (Eucalyptus miniata) flowers (May) that is the time to begin early dry season burning to clean up the dead grass after the wet. They knew the best time to do this earlier rather than later in the dry, while the land still retained moisture and fires would be less intense. This is one example of many of the 'Calendar Plants' that told Aboriginal people the season they were in and reminded them of important activities that would be associated with that season.

Banggarreng - (Bung-ger-reng) - late March to late April. Floodwaters recede. Most plants are fruiting and animals caring for their young. Spear grass quickly dries out and yellows. Violent, windy storms flatten the spear grass - 'knock-em-down' storms. Dragonflies herald the coming dry season. As floodwaters drop, Bamurru (Magpie Geese) nest in the reeds.

Yegge (Yeg-gay) - late April to early June. Relatively cool, low humidity. Wetlands and billabongs carpeted with water lilies. Drying winds and flowering Woolybutt tell Bininj* that it is time to start burning woodlands in patches to 'clean the country', encouraging new growth for grazing animals.

Wurrgeng (Woor-e-geng) - early June to mid August 'Cold weather' time. Humidity low. Day temperature around 30˚C and night around 17˚. Most creeks stop flowing and floodplains dry out. Burning continues, extinguished by the dew at night. Black Kites patrol the fire lines as insects and small animals try to escape the flames. Magpie Geese crowd the shrinking billabongs.

Gurrung (pronounced Goo-roong) - mid August to early October. Hot and Dry. Still 'goose time', also time for Bininj* to hunt File Snakes and Long-necked Turtles.

Gunumeleng (Goo-noo-mel-eng) early October to late December. Hot, becoming more humid. Thunderstorms and scattered showers bring a tinge of green to the land. Waterbirds disperse as water and new growth becomes more widespread. Bininj* moved camp to stone country to shelter from violent storms of the coming wet season.

Gunumeleng can also bring fires, started from lightning strikes on floodplains or in woodlands. The pre-monsoon season is a burst of rapid growth, energy production which results in nutrient storage for all life forms. It is the transition from Gurung to Gudjeug. Ripening of the little green plums called Anduwitjmi tells Bininj that the pre-monsoon is starting.

Gudjeuk (Goo-jewk) - late December to late March. True wet season, heavy rain and flooding. The land gets filled with water and the creeks flow. Ginga (Estuarine Crocodile) females guard the nests as young ones are hatching. Dusky Rats are forced out of their holes and Water Pythons feast on them. Paperbark trees are flowering and honeyeaters, lorikeets and bats feast on them. Spear grass grows to over 2 metres tall. Bininj* collect eggs and stranded animals.

Yeah, 100% agree..... definitely 6 seasons in the Top End.

Last edited by greysrigging; 06-21-2020 at 02:48 AM..
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Old 06-21-2020, 10:38 AM
 
Location: In transition
10,519 posts, read 12,985,557 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greysrigging View Post
Darwin Australia 12.5*S. The Wiki entry ( I prefer the local Indigenous description of the seasons....
"Darwin has a tropical savanna climate (Köppen Aw) with distinct wet and dry seasons and the average maximum temperature is similar all year round. The dry season runs from about May to September, during which nearly every day is sunny, and afternoon relative humidity averages around 30%.The driest period of the year, seeing only approximately 5 mm (0.20 in) of monthly rainfall on average, is between May and September. In the coolest months of June and July, the daily minimum temperature may dip as low as 14 °C (57 °F), but very rarely lower, and a temperature lower than 10 °C (50 °F) has never been recorded in the city centre. Outer suburbs away from the coast, however, can occasionally record temperatures as low as 5 °C (41 °F) in the dry season. For a 147‑day period during the 2012 dry season, from 5 May to 29 September, Darwin recorded no precipitation whatsoever. Prolonged periods of no precipitation are common in the dry season in Northern Australia (particularly in the Northern Territory and northern regions of Western Australia), although a no-rainfall event of this extent is rare. The 3pm dewpoint average in the wet season is at around 24.0 °C (75.2 °F).[33]

Extreme temperatures at the Darwin Post Office Station have ranged from 40.4 °C (104.7 °F) on 17 October 1892 to 13.4 °C (56.1 °F) on 25 June 1891; while extreme temperatures at the Darwin Airport station (which is further from the coast and routinely records cooler temperatures than the post office station, which is in Darwin's CBD) have ranged from 38.9 °C (102.0 °F) on 18 October 1982 to 10.4 °C (50.7 °F) on 29 July 1942. The highest minimum temperature on record is 30.7 °C (87.3 °F) on 18 January 1928 for the post office station and 30.2 °C (86.4 °F) on 27 December 2019 for the airport station, while the lowest maximum temperature on record is 18.4 °C (65.1 °F) on 3 June 1904 for the post office station and 21.1 °C (70.0 °F) on 14 July 1968 for the airport station.

The wet season is associated with tropical cyclones and monsoon rains.[35] The majority of rainfall occurs between December and March (the southern hemisphere summer), when thunderstorms are common and afternoon relative humidity averages over 70 percent during the wettest months.[33] It does not rain every day during the wet season, but most days have plentiful cloud cover; January averages under 6 hours of bright sunshine daily. Darwin's highest Bureau of Meteorology verified daily rainfall total is 367.6 millimetres (14.47 in), which fell when Cyclone Carlos bore down on the Darwin area on 16 February 2011.[36] February 2011 was also Darwin's wettest month ever recorded, with 1,110.2 millimetres (43.71 in) recorded for the month at the airport.[33]

The hottest month is November, just before the onset of the main rain season. The heat index sometimes rises above 45 °C (113 °F), while the actual temperature is usually below 35 °C (95 °F), because of humidity levels that most would find uncomfortable. Because of its long dry season, Darwin has the second-highest average daily hours of sunshine (8.4) of any Australian capital, with the most sunshine from April to November; only Perth, Western Australia, averages more (8.8). The sun passes directly overhead in mid-October and mid-February.[37]

The average temperature of the sea ranges from 25.8 °C (78.4 °F) in July to 31.5 °C (88.7 °F) in December.[38]

Darwin occupies one of the most lightning-prone areas in Australia. On 31 January 2002 an early-morning squall line produced over 5,000 cloud-to-ground lightning strikes within a 60-kilometre (37 mi) radius of Darwin alone—about three times the amount of lightning that Perth, Western Australia, experiences on average in an entire year."

The Indigenous seasons and descriptions....
"The four seasons Summer, Autumn, Winter and Spring are not relevant in the Top End. To Non-Aboriginal (Balanda) people usually only two seasons are referred to - the Wet (November to April) and the Dry (May to October), with an acknowledgement of the 'Build-Up' which is late dry early wet. And if you are a fisherman there is the 'Run-Off'.

Six Seasons! Aboriginal people (Bininj) have lived outdoors for thousands of years and harmonize their lives with seasonal movements. They didn't use the Gregorian calendar to mark the start of a new season, they observed the flowering and fruiting of plants and linked their foraging and hunting activities to these. For example, when the Darwin Woolybutt (Eucalyptus miniata) flowers (May) that is the time to begin early dry season burning to clean up the dead grass after the wet. They knew the best time to do this earlier rather than later in the dry, while the land still retained moisture and fires would be less intense. This is one example of many of the 'Calendar Plants' that told Aboriginal people the season they were in and reminded them of important activities that would be associated with that season.

Banggarreng - (Bung-ger-reng) - late March to late April. Floodwaters recede. Most plants are fruiting and animals caring for their young. Spear grass quickly dries out and yellows. Violent, windy storms flatten the spear grass - 'knock-em-down' storms. Dragonflies herald the coming dry season. As floodwaters drop, Bamurru (Magpie Geese) nest in the reeds.

Yegge (Yeg-gay) - late April to early June. Relatively cool, low humidity. Wetlands and billabongs carpeted with water lilies. Drying winds and flowering Woolybutt tell Bininj* that it is time to start burning woodlands in patches to 'clean the country', encouraging new growth for grazing animals.

Wurrgeng (Woor-e-geng) - early June to mid August 'Cold weather' time. Humidity low. Day temperature around 30˚C and night around 17˚. Most creeks stop flowing and floodplains dry out. Burning continues, extinguished by the dew at night. Black Kites patrol the fire lines as insects and small animals try to escape the flames. Magpie Geese crowd the shrinking billabongs.

Gurrung (pronounced Goo-roong) - mid August to early October. Hot and Dry. Still 'goose time', also time for Bininj* to hunt File Snakes and Long-necked Turtles.

Gunumeleng (Goo-noo-mel-eng) early October to late December. Hot, becoming more humid. Thunderstorms and scattered showers bring a tinge of green to the land. Waterbirds disperse as water and new growth becomes more widespread. Bininj* moved camp to stone country to shelter from violent storms of the coming wet season.

Gunumeleng can also bring fires, started from lightning strikes on floodplains or in woodlands. The pre-monsoon season is a burst of rapid growth, energy production which results in nutrient storage for all life forms. It is the transition from Gurung to Gudjeug. Ripening of the little green plums called Anduwitjmi tells Bininj that the pre-monsoon is starting.

Gudjeuk (Goo-jewk) - late December to late March. True wet season, heavy rain and flooding. The land gets filled with water and the creeks flow. Ginga (Estuarine Crocodile) females guard the nests as young ones are hatching. Dusky Rats are forced out of their holes and Water Pythons feast on them. Paperbark trees are flowering and honeyeaters, lorikeets and bats feast on them. Spear grass grows to over 2 metres tall. Bininj* collect eggs and stranded animals.

Yeah, 100% agree..... definitely 6 seasons in the Top End.
Aboriginal season descriptions sound great. Darwin looks amazing with all the tropical vegetation, interesting flora and fauna and cool lightning storms.
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Old 06-22-2020, 08:01 AM
 
Location: Bologna, Italy
6,854 posts, read 4,141,722 times
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I live in Cfa, but I'm not a poet.



Spring:



The most interesting season of the year. The driest also, but it can see intense rain events, especially towards the end, when it starts to get real warm and thundery. In the beginning it can also see some snow, but it melts so fast. It's also the most comfortable season of the year as it's generally dry, sunny and the temperatures are generally nice. Short sleeves are possible in the afternoon when April comes, but the nights have this nice chilly and somewhat windy weather. It is very green everywhere.



Summer: Summer starts as soon as shorts are mandatory. It also gets more humid overall, but it does not rain all that often. Most of the time it is very sunny, but the odd overcast day is possible. Clouds are huge and interesting, unless they all disappear and we enter into drought mode. Nights are mild but humid and you break a sweat easily even after midnight. The trees are glorious, but sometimes the grass looks yellowish.



Fall: It starts off generally warm and sunny, but the heat is not as strong. At some point in september, long pants are not a problem anymore, but the sun is still shining. The days are starting to get substantially shorter, and it's surprising to see the early sunsets when you're still in a tshirt. The maximum temperatures decrease a lot more in october, but the lows are still warm. The heat goes away, but the humidity remains. It starts to be chilly and sweaty at the same time. Unlike Spring, Fall is not comfortable. You break a sweat but you get cold easily. You put on that heavier jacket, but it's still too warm for activity. In a couple of weeks, the same jacket will already feel too cold. The skies are hazy, the sun can be hidden between a wall of clouds, yet you can feel it. After a while the light decreases considerably and it gets pretty cold. Rain can be heavy as well. November is when the real darkness comes, and you kinda wish you'd see some sun and crisp weather, but it rarely comes. The grass is green and puddles are everywhere, even several days after the last rain. The trees lose their leaves a few weeks before christmas. Some of them are yellow or red, but they're not that common.



Winter: Winter is just a harsher fall. It rarely gets arctic cold, but you know it never gets warm. Sunshine can be abundant, but it is generally reserved for the lucky people up on the hills. Down in the plain you just see fog. Somehow the sky is never quite clear. The humidity has gotten so high that it gets through your skin and you never feel warm enough, even under several layers of clothing. A rare windy day cleans the polluted air and brings some more sun, but the locals complain about it, as they've embraced the dark humid weather. They grew up with it. Some other time, the snow makes its first apparition and it feels awesome. Deep wet snow. Unfortunately it's gone after a few days. By the end of the season, the weather starts to get drier and the southern winds make you leave your coat at home, You enjoy the fact that the days are finally not so short as you ride a bike without a beanie and with lighter clothing. The best season is coming back.
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