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Old 12-14-2020, 12:31 AM
 
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I know that here in Socal thunderstorms sometimes get as far west as the coastal mountains but I read that they are blocked from making it all the way to the coast because the cold sea water stabilizes the atmosphere. So my question is, hypothetically, how much of a difference on the weather would it make if an area the size of the Southern California Bright had water temps in the 80s in the summer months(by having some sort of blocking barrier cutting of the cold current etc)? Do you think we would have as much rain as the gulf or east coast in summer, or would the subtropical high prevent storms from forming at all?
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Old 12-14-2020, 07:10 AM
 
Location: Live:Downtown Phoenix, AZ/Work:Greater Los Angeles, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cyplenkov10 View Post
I know that here in Socal thunderstorms sometimes get as far west as the coastal mountains but I read that they are blocked from making it all the way to the coast because the cold sea water stabilizes the atmosphere. So my question is, hypothetically, how much of a difference on the weather would it make if an area the size of the Southern California Bright had water temps in the 80s in the summer months(by having some sort of blocking barrier cutting of the cold current etc)? Do you think we would have as much rain as the gulf or east coast in summer, or would the subtropical high prevent storms from forming at all?
The closest I can think of of a real world example is the summer of 2006, when the Pacific off the coast of San Diego hit 80°F. There was a long period with hot and humid air in the San Diego and Los Angeles areas, mainly in July that year. Some sprinkles did fall at times
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Old 12-14-2020, 03:45 PM
 
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Yeah I know what you mean that sometimes we get strong heat waves that raise SSTs for a week or two at a time, like the one in August 2018. But I noticed its always because of really strong high pressure moving directly overhead, which probably changes a lot of other factors as well, like blocking onshore flow, preventing cloud formation etc. So I’m guessing its pretty different than having normal atmospheric conditions with only the variable of much warmer ocean waters being changed?
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