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View Poll Results: What's your LEAST favorite climate type?
Tropical [AF/AM/AS] 6 10.71%
Hot Desert [BWH] 17 30.36%
Cold Desert [BWK] 3 5.36%
Semi-Arid [BSH/BSK] 0 0%
Subtropical [CFA/CWA] 0 0%
Oceanic [CFB/CWB] 0 0%
Subpolar Oceanic [CFC/CWC] 1 1.79%
Hot Summer Mediterranean [CSA] 0 0%
Warm Summer Mediterranean [CSB] 1 1.79%
Hot Summer Contenental [DSA/DWA/DFA] 3 5.36%
Warm Summer Continental [DSB/DWB/DFB] 0 0%
Subarctic [DSC/DSD/DWC/DWD/DFC/DFD] 2 3.57%
Arctic [ET/EF] 22 39.29%
Other/something more specific 1 1.79%
Voters: 56. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 12-25-2020, 04:09 PM
 
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Polar (ET and EF) are the worst, with EF worse than ET. There's a reason very few people live in these climates. They are the most inhospitable climates for human habitation, which is why they were the last to be settled by humans (high arctic) and the last to be explored (Antarctica).
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Old 12-25-2020, 06:48 PM
 
Location: Live:Downtown Phoenix, AZ/Work:Greater Los Angeles, CA
25,878 posts, read 10,271,216 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bisfbath View Post
Polar (ET and EF) are the worst, with EF worse than ET. There's a reason very few people live in these climates. They are the most inhospitable climates for human habitation, which is why they were the last to be settled by humans (high arctic) and the last to be explored (Antarctica).
Subpolar and tundra climates also can't support modern style cities due to the permafrost. During the summer warm season, the top layer thaws, while the lower layers stay frozen, so the soil gets water logged. Impossible to build on without dredging
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Old 12-26-2020, 12:10 AM
 
Location: Corona del Mar & Coronado, CA
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I could not live full time in Phoenix/Scottsdale, Las Vegas or Palm Springs area. I wouldn't mind a home for winter, but never full time.
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Old 12-31-2020, 11:18 AM
 
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Hot and humid is by far the worst for me (especially Florida). Best climate for me is 4 season, preferably with a longer fall/winter season and lots of overcast days with little rain.
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Old 12-31-2020, 11:46 AM
 
989 posts, read 303,164 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FirebirdCamaro1220 View Post
Subpolar and tundra climates also can't support modern style cities due to the permafrost. During the summer warm season, the top layer thaws, while the lower layers stay frozen, so the soil gets water logged. Impossible to build on without dredging
True, though there are ways of doing it. But the problem is deeper and goes back further in time. Even going back to the days of hunter gatherers, the Arctic was inhabited later than other climate zones as it took more adaptations for people to survive there. Then later, without the possibility of agriculture people could only survive by hunting or on imported goods.

People first settled in the high arctic roughly 12 thousand years ago, Arabia ~70 thousand years ago, India, South East Asia and Australia ~65 thousand years ago, the Near East ~50 thousand years ago and Europe and China ~45 thousand years ago.

Even once they crossed into the Americas, people got all the way down to southern South America (~14 thousand years ago) long before they got to Arctic Canada (~5 thousand years ago) and Greenland (~4 thousand years ago).

Simply very cold climates are more hostile, require more adaptations for survival and have fewer draws than warmer ones.

See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o...s_mercator.svg
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Old 12-31-2020, 02:21 PM
 
Location: Live:Downtown Phoenix, AZ/Work:Greater Los Angeles, CA
25,878 posts, read 10,271,216 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bisfbath View Post
True, though there are ways of doing it. But the problem is deeper and goes back further in time. Even going back to the days of hunter gatherers, the Arctic was inhabited later than other climate zones as it took more adaptations for people to survive there. Then later, without the possibility of agriculture people could only survive by hunting or on imported goods.

People first settled in the high arctic roughly 12 thousand years ago, Arabia ~70 thousand years ago, India, South East Asia and Australia ~65 thousand years ago, the Near East ~50 thousand years ago and Europe and China ~45 thousand years ago.

Even once they crossed into the Americas, people got all the way down to southern South America (~14 thousand years ago) long before they got to Arctic Canada (~5 thousand years ago) and Greenland (~4 thousand years ago).

Simply very cold climates are more hostile, require more adaptations for survival and have fewer draws than warmer ones.

See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o...s_mercator.svg
This is why modern settlements in the taiga or tundra (other than by indigenous peoples) only happen for resource extraction (oil, gold, diamonds, etc) Because they have to import all their food and what not, gets very expensive
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Old 12-31-2020, 05:27 PM
 
Location: Trondheim, Norway - 63 N
3,417 posts, read 2,145,791 times
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In the boreal forest of Scandinavia, Finland and western Russia, there are many towns that have existed for a long time (hundreds of years), also with agriculture in addition to fishing og hunting, some of them with agriculture as the primary way of getting food. Those towns are mostly in the southern part of the boreal forest /taiga where there are no permafrost & somewhat milder climate than in the more continental part of the taiga. The further you go closer to the tundra, the less agriculture in those cultures.

This is a grain field near Oulu in Finland, situated in the boreal forest/taiga vegetation zone.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oulu#Climate
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Old 12-31-2020, 07:08 PM
 
Location: Perth, Western Australia
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I reckon Arctic or Polar is the worst climate, seeing as it it is unlivable.

Deserts be they hot or cold are not great due to lack of rainfall, it's bad enough in a Mediterranean climate with 6 months of drought.
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Old 12-31-2020, 07:16 PM
 
Location: In transition
69 posts, read 22,253 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FirebirdCamaro1220 View Post
This is why modern settlements in the taiga or tundra (other than by indigenous peoples) only happen for resource extraction (oil, gold, diamonds, etc) Because they have to import all their food and what not, gets very expensive
Agriculture is possible in both taiga and tundra, it’s only not possible in ice caps because agriculture is possible when it’s above freezing.
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Old 12-31-2020, 07:31 PM
 
Location: Live:Downtown Phoenix, AZ/Work:Greater Los Angeles, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Massiveshibe View Post
Agriculture is possible in both taiga and tundra, it’s only not possible in ice caps because agriculture is possible when it’s above freezing.
No, it isn't really. There's generally no arable soil in the muskeg environment, as the bog is acidic in nature
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