U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Weather
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 04-26-2021, 03:37 AM
 
987 posts, read 299,254 times
Reputation: 572

Advertisements

Areas north and south of the equator get more energy from the sun in summer than the equator gets at any time of year. I'm talking at the top of the atmosphere before clouds block some, as is more common near the equator.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-27-2021, 07:14 AM
SFX
 
Location: Tennessee
908 posts, read 446,625 times
Reputation: 479
Do you have a source that says that?
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-27-2021, 08:12 AM
 
987 posts, read 299,254 times
Reputation: 572
Quote:
Originally Posted by SFX View Post
Do you have a source that says that?
Yes, see NASA:

https://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/fe...ance/page3.php

Bear in mind that this is at the top of the atmosphere, not at ground level. Equatorial regions tend to be more cloudy than those around the tropics of Cancer and Capricorn, which intercepts a lot of incoming energy. Plus they tend to be wetter - evaporation causes cooling and humid air takes more energy to heat than dry air.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-28-2021, 03:41 PM
SFX
 
Location: Tennessee
908 posts, read 446,625 times
Reputation: 479
That page doesn't say it's top of the atmosphere
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-28-2021, 04:43 PM
 
987 posts, read 299,254 times
Reputation: 572
Quote:
Originally Posted by SFX View Post
That page doesn't say it's top of the atmosphere
The caption of the pink/purple/black chart says:-

The total energy received each day at the top of the atmosphere depends on latitude. The highest daily amounts of incoming energy (pale pink) occur at high latitudes in summer, when days are long, rather than at the equator. In winter, some polar latitudes receive no light at all (black). The Southern Hemisphere receives more energy during December (southern summer) than the Northern Hemisphere does in June (northern summer) because Earth’s orbit is not a perfect circle and Earth is slightly closer to the Sun during that part of its orbit. Total energy received ranges from 0 (during polar winter) to about 50 (during polar summer) megajoules per square meter per day.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-29-2021, 09:49 AM
SFX
 
Location: Tennessee
908 posts, read 446,625 times
Reputation: 479
Ah thanks. I stand corrected.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-29-2021, 09:55 AM
SFX
 
Location: Tennessee
908 posts, read 446,625 times
Reputation: 479
Now let's see the energy received at the surface!
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-29-2021, 10:33 AM
Status: "Communing with leprechauns" (set 17 hours ago)
 
Location: Mars City
7,016 posts, read 3,531,630 times
Reputation: 10845
Quote:
Originally Posted by jvalens View Post
It's too humid at the equator for record temperatures. South America has a dry region near the equator, but it's too close to the ocean to get extremely hot.
My vote for the best answer so far. You can't overlook humidity and the moderating effects of large bodies of water.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-29-2021, 11:44 AM
 
683 posts, read 604,885 times
Reputation: 349
Death valley is a desert and is separated from the oceans by mountains and prairies.

Most of the equator is ocean.

These temperatures are in the summer, when the sun is as close as only 12.5 degrees from overhead.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 06:55 AM
SFX
 
Location: Tennessee
908 posts, read 446,625 times
Reputation: 479
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thoreau424 View Post
My vote for the best answer so far. You can't overlook humidity and the moderating effects of large bodies of water.
And yet global warming is supposed to make it more humid, which they then claim will make it hotter.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Weather

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2021, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top