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Old 04-27-2021, 02:51 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
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The new 30-year averages from NOAA are due to be released a week from today. From what I’ve read, most of the U.S. is hotter now, and some areas get higher rainfall (but fewer rainy days) while others are drier. Do you foresee any classification changes for cities in borderline climates? I think it will be very interesting to see what has changed and to what extent.
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Old 04-27-2021, 03:20 PM
 
Location: Fort Worth, Texas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jread View Post
The new 30-year averages from NOAA are due to be released a week from today. From what I’ve read, most of the U.S. is hotter now, and some areas get higher rainfall (but fewer rainy days) while others are drier. Do you foresee any classification changes for cities in borderline climates? I think it will be very interesting to see what has changed and to what extent.
Much of the coastal northeast probably will become more solidly Cfa, while the upper Midwest or northern plains will be a tad bit colder than the previous averages, especially during late winter and spring, and much of the United States west of the Rockies but east of the west coast look to become even more arid than they were previously.
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Old 04-27-2021, 05:03 PM
 
Location: Live:Downtown Phoenix, AZ/Work:Greater Los Angeles, CA
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I think Rochester, NY will just eek out Dfa (they've been Dfb), I think July there will avg 22°C exactly or just over it
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Old 04-27-2021, 05:28 PM
 
Location: Roslyn Harbor, NY
193 posts, read 70,986 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jread View Post
The new 30-year averages from NOAA are due to be released a week from today. From what I’ve read, most of the U.S. is hotter now, and some areas get higher rainfall (but fewer rainy days) while others are drier. Do you foresee any classification changes for cities in borderline climates? I think it will be very interesting to see what has changed and to what extent.
The impacts of climate change are going to increase rapidly in the coming decades, but for now most areas are only warming by a degree or two, more pronounced in winter. Thus, it is areas that border on other climate zones that will see their classifications shift. I'll break down my thoughts regionally.

In the Northeast, the Cfa climate will extend further inland and north, the borderline may now run along the Connecticut coast. Cities like White Plains and New Haven may become Cfa. Some areas in coastal Rhode Island and eastward have cooler summers, they could be Cfb. This boundary would still be well to the south of Boston, though.

In the South, some high elevation areas may shift from continental to subtropical as well, but the bigger changes are in South Florida. The tropical savanna climate will extend up to Sarasota, almost to the Tampa area, on the gulf and to Port Saint Lucie on the Atlantic.

In the Midwest, the Cfa zone border will shift northward to include Saint Louis, Kansas City, Louisville, and Cincinnati. The West will see more shifts based on precipitation, with semiarid zones taking over much of the SoCal coast, including LA. Some valley areas of the PNW could also become Csb or even Csa in a few spots.
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Old 04-27-2021, 06:40 PM
 
Location: Sydney, Australia
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I wonder how NYC's climate would look like.
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Old 04-27-2021, 07:26 PM
 
Location: Fort Worth, Texas
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Originally Posted by Ethereal View Post
I wonder how NYC's climate would look like.
More solidly Cfa most likely. I feel that central park’s January mean temperature would go up around a degree in temperature from about 32.6 in the 1981-2010 mean to maybe like around 34.0 F in the 1991-2020 climate normals.
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Old 04-27-2021, 07:29 PM
 
Location: Fort Worth, Texas
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Indianapolis’ January mean temperature increased from 28.1 F in the 1981-2010 normals to around 28.5 F in the preliminary 1991-2020 climate normals so Indianapolis is still obviously firmly a Dfa climate zone, But I’d imagine the Cfa zone border may have inched ever so slightly further north in the Hoosier state with the updated 1991-2020 climate normals.
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Old 04-28-2021, 07:57 AM
 
12 posts, read 2,456 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jread View Post
The new 30-year averages from NOAA are due to be released a week from today. From what I’ve read, most of the U.S. is hotter now, and some areas get higher rainfall (but fewer rainy days) while others are drier. Do you foresee any classification changes for cities in borderline climates? I think it will be very interesting to see what has changed and to what extent.
Weather.gov has maps already- 5 and 10 years- air, water, temperature, precipitation- etc.
not the easiest site to navigate- but it is all there
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Old 04-28-2021, 12:39 PM
 
295 posts, read 138,254 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Isleofpalms85 View Post
Indianapolis’ January mean temperature increased from 28.1 F in the 1981-2010 normals to around 28.5 F in the preliminary 1991-2020 climate normals so Indianapolis is still obviously firmly a Dfa climate zone, But I’d imagine the Cfa zone border may have inched ever so slightly further north in the Hoosier state with the updated 1991-2020 climate normals.
28.1 F would already be Cfa if we use the -3 C isotherm. I wonder where the -3 C isotherm lies for 1991-2020 climate normals...
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Old 04-28-2021, 01:29 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in Canada
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I think that Fairbanks, Alaska might become a humid continental climate due to May being very mild.
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