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Old 03-09-2024, 04:09 PM
 
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My memories ( growing up in Northern Victoria ) are of 'Indian Summers'.... always seemed to be hot around Moomba in Melbourne.
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Old 03-09-2024, 08:25 PM
Status: "Tyson K" (set 10 hours ago)
 
Location: In yo head
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WesterlyWX View Post
I'm kind of glad it is - we haven't had a proper March heatwave since the 2000s I think. This reminds me of our beautiful old age climate where we used to get Indian Summers every year, and when February used to be the hottest month on average. I honestly hope it never rains again, I'm so sick of the bloody rain and humidity.
No decent rain since mid-February, at least here in Melbourne. Welcome to the climate change era of hot and dry.
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Old 03-09-2024, 08:31 PM
 
Location: Corryong (Northeast Victoria)
901 posts, read 345,644 times
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Originally Posted by veshyvonny View Post
No decent rain since mid-February, at least here in Melbourne. Welcome to the climate change era of hot and dry.
Other way around old boy. Climate change has made our summers wetter- only winters have gotten drier. Climate change has also shifted our hottest month to January, instead of February like it used to be, and Indian Summers are now rarer as a result. This recent weather is thus a brief return to our wonderful old age climate.

Dry summers are the norm in Victoria. Wet summers are NOT normal. Don't let your preferences get in the way of reality.
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Old 03-09-2024, 08:43 PM
Status: "Tyson K" (set 10 hours ago)
 
Location: In yo head
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Originally Posted by WesterlyWX View Post
Other way around old boy. Climate change has made our summers wetter- only winters have gotten drier. Climate change has also shifted our hottest month to January, instead of February like it used to be, and Indian Summers are now rarer as a result. This recent weather is thus a brief return to our wonderful old age climate.

Dry summers are the norm in Victoria. Wet summers are NOT normal. Don't let your preferences get in the way of reality.
1. We had a few cool Feburaries (2020-2022), but that's all, no pattern, also if summer is getting earlier, why have we not hit 40C in December since 2019? in 2024, February (or maybe even March) is the hottest month, late summer indeed
2. Tell a Perthian their summers are getting "wetter". 6 mm all summer, wettest in 3 years.
3. Climate History. Hottest March: 2016, not 2000s. Even then, 2000s climate ≠ "Old-age climate", we were in a giant drought then, and climate change was still big then, like it has been since the 60s.
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Old 03-09-2024, 09:13 PM
 
Location: Corryong (Northeast Victoria)
901 posts, read 345,644 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by veshyvonny View Post
1. We had a few cool Feburaries (2020-2022), but that's all, no pattern, also if summer is getting earlier, why have we not hit 40C in December since 2019? in 2024, February (or maybe even March) is the hottest month, late summer indeed
2. Tell a Perthian their summers are getting "wetter". 6 mm all summer, wettest in 3 years.
3. Climate History. Hottest March: 2016, not 2000s. Even then, 2000s climate ≠ "Old-age climate", we were in a giant drought then, and climate change was still big then, like it has been since the 60s.


I'm referring to averages and heatwave length, NOT record highs on a single day.

Oh, and where the hell did I mention Perth anywhere in my post? I specified Victoria, and Victoria only (plus southern NSW).

Oh, and the 2000s were much cooler than the 2020s with low level snow a frequent occurence. The climate in the 2000s was very similar to the climate in the 1960s. It's only after 2015 or so that global boiling became a thing (the last cold winter in AUS).
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Old 03-09-2024, 09:35 PM
Status: "Tyson K" (set 10 hours ago)
 
Location: In yo head
421 posts, read 219,522 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WesterlyWX View Post


I'm referring to averages and heatwave length, NOT record highs on a single day.

Oh, and where the hell did I mention Perth anywhere in my post? I specified Victoria, and Victoria only (plus southern NSW).

Oh, and the 2000s were much cooler than the 2020s with low level snow a frequent occurence. The climate in the 2000s was very similar to the climate in the 1960s. It's only after 2015 or so that global boiling became a thing (the last cold winter in AUS).
The Earth has been warming since the 60s, and even longer actually, but the trend became apparent then.
And if this is "global boiling", why is only Victoria affected, wouldn't it be global? The global trend is hot and dry, Victoria is a speck in terms of the world.
Also, the way you paint this is "glorious heatwave" just because you live in the past, i'm sweating in my 30C house, but your privileged ass be baking in AC
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Old 03-09-2024, 11:37 PM
 
Location: Corryong (Northeast Victoria)
901 posts, read 345,644 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by veshyvonny View Post
The Earth has been warming since the 60s, and even longer actually, but the trend became apparent then.
And if this is "global boiling", why is only Victoria affected, wouldn't it be global? The global trend is hot and dry, Victoria is a speck in terms of the world.
Also, the way you paint this is "glorious heatwave" just because you live in the past, i'm sweating in my 30C house, but your privileged ass be baking in AC
That warming was natural however, unlike the recent warming which was no doubt caused by Scomo and the Lib Nat coalition. Scomo stole our winters and should be locked up for life.

I say 'global' boiling because it rolls off the tongue, but obviously AUS has warmed 10x faster than anywhere else in the world, especially in winter.

The global trend is hotter and WETTER https://climate.nasa.gov/explore/ask...nhouse-effect/ You can't argue with the organisation that put Man on the moon, unless you also deny the moon landing?
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Old 03-10-2024, 06:51 PM
Status: "Tyson K" (set 10 hours ago)
 
Location: In yo head
421 posts, read 219,522 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WesterlyWX View Post
That warming was natural however, unlike the recent warming which was no doubt caused by Scomo and the Lib Nat coalition. Scomo stole our winters and should be locked up for life.

I say 'global' boiling because it rolls off the tongue, but obviously AUS has warmed 10x faster than anywhere else in the world, especially in winter.

The global trend is hotter and WETTER https://climate.nasa.gov/explore/ask...nhouse-effect/ You can't argue with the organisation that put Man on the moon, unless you also deny the moon landing?
Look at the worldwide stats, not a cherry-picked article.
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Old 03-11-2024, 01:05 AM
 
Location: Corryong (Northeast Victoria)
901 posts, read 345,644 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by veshyvonny View Post
Look at the worldwide stats, not a cherry-picked article.
The stats all agree that it's getting WETTER in most regions (key word: MOST). Obviously there are exceptions like WA and ofcourse a certain part of Florida which are usually drier under La Nina - the dominant ENSO phase as the planet superheats.
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Old 03-12-2024, 12:04 AM
 
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Australia's largest sheep station underwater
( source: Weatherzone www.weatherzone.com.au )

Record West Australian rainfall has closed the Eyre Highway that links Perth to the eastern states and flooded outback stations, including Australia’s largest sheep station Rawlinna.

Just two days ago, we ran a story here at Weatherzone with the headline "Colossal rainfall over the Nullarbor", and again, extremely heavy rain has fallen over the Nullarbor Plain in Western Australia.

The heaviest falls continue to be recorded in southeastern WA in the area centred around Eyre weather station – on WA's southern coast approximately 300 km east of the SA Border.

Since the deluge began late last week, the Eyre weather station, located at the Eyre Bird Observatory, has now seen:

11 mm in the 24 hours to 9 am Saturday

141.2 mm in the 24 hours to 9 am Sunday

43.8 mm in the 24 hours to 9 am Monday

129 mm in the 24 hours to 9 am Tuesday

That makes a running total of 325 mm in the 96 hours ending at 9 am Tuesday, which has absolutely decimated their record for the heaviest rainfall in any single month, which was 203.8 mm in March 1912.

Incredibly, it also means that Eyre has exceeded its annual rainfall average within four days, having registered 325mm from this event so far. Its average annual rainfall is 315.9mm.

Just north of the Eyre weather station at Rawlinna Sheep Station, the pictures tell the story.

The million-hectare station stocking 60,000 Merino sheep is known as Australia's largest sheep station and is roughly the size of the greater Sydney metropolitan region, but today it is starting to resemble a rapidly filling dry desert lake.

Station Overseer Craig Chandler even took to the kayak to rescue the station's chickens, paddling the poultry to safety.


^^The cause of this unusually heavy rain in one of Australia’s driest regions is illustrated in the weather chart above which shows an upper-level high pressure system centred over the Camerons Corner area at the junction of the NSW/SA, and Qld borders.

The upper level high is blocking the progression of systems from west to east, enabling a moisture-laden feed of air to flow from the tropics all the way across the interior of WA down towards the Great Australian Bight.

You can see the moist tropical flow indicated by the purply-pink colour, and rain continues to fall as we publish this story, with further heavy rain possible in the days ahead.

Note to media: You are welcome to republish text from the above news article as direct quotes from Weatherzone. When doing so, please reference www.weatherzone.com.au in the credit.
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