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View Poll Results: Which one is more subtropical?
North Carolina 14 51.85%
North Island NZ 10 37.04%
Both in their way 4 14.81%
None 0 0%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 27. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 04-08-2024, 04:49 PM
 
43 posts, read 4,771 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Climatepolice48 View Post
In Central Florida there is some dormancy but not for everything.
That would be true of Northern India and parts of tropical Australia...

Central Florida is an evergreen climate. Its not a dormant environment at all, it is dominated by evergreen canopy, palms, tropicals, subtropical pine, hammock forest...yes, bald cypress and some scantily grown northern temperate species can drop leaves...
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Old 04-08-2024, 07:00 PM
 
Location: New Zealand
381 posts, read 94,311 times
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NZ is not a dormant environment at all, into far as not a single native species has a chill requirement. It has spring deciduous species, and species that can handle defoilation. It also has species that flower during the colder months, and many lowland species can put on substantial growth over winter.

Winter temperatures in my south island location allow for both full dormancy of northern Hemisphere zone 4 species, along side northern subtropical species that will flower the entire winter.
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Old 04-08-2024, 07:47 PM
 
Location: Victoria, BC, Canada
5,722 posts, read 3,505,785 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jamesja View Post
...

Googling "deciduous trees native to Queensland" immediately dispels that assertion. Winter dormancy is not particularly notable in Central Florida, even if there are deciduous species, the same is largely true of Brisbane.
None of Queensland's few deciduous trees are native to Brisbane: they are native to those parts of Tropical Queensland that have a distinct dry season. Brisbane does not have a dry season hence no native deciduous trees (that I know of anyway–they did plant a few non-native examples in King George Square). Even if Brtisbane did have a dry season, we all know that tropical dry season deciduousness is not the same as continental cold season dormancy.

Native forests in South East Queensland (Brisbane) are predominantly moist eucalypt, open eucalypt, or subtropical rainforest--none of which exhibit any dormancy. Here are some photos I’ve taken of the subtropical rainforest near Brisbane in the middle of winter.










I completely agree that winter dormancy is not particularly notable in Central Florida--which is why I was surprised to see it raised as an issue--but I can assure you it's absent from Brisbane.

Last edited by Ed's Mountain; 04-08-2024 at 07:50 PM.. Reason: Punctuation
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Old 04-08-2024, 07:48 PM
 
Location: St. Pete Beach, FL
142 posts, read 32,641 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jamesja View Post
That would be true of Northern India and parts of tropical Australia...

Central Florida is an evergreen climate. Its not a dormant environment at all, it is dominated by evergreen canopy, palms, tropicals, subtropical pine, hammock forest...yes, bald cypress and some scantily grown northern temperate species can drop leaves...
I know all of that, nope Florida is not specifically evergreen it is still mixed forests of the temperate forests, it is transitional here to some tropical biomes in south. I literally live here. The native vegetation of here is mixed, the deciduous here drop their leaves. So it is inaccurate to say it is not at all dormant, I live here it is for a very short period but it happens though not complete either. Southern Florida, well that is another story, it’s deciduos trees do drop leaves but there is no actual dormancy.
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Old 04-08-2024, 07:51 PM
 
Location: St. Pete Beach, FL
142 posts, read 32,641 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ed's Mountain View Post
None of Queensland's few deciduous trees are native to Brisbane: they are native to those parts of Tropical Queensland that have a distinct dry season. Brisbane does not have a dry season hence no native deciduous trees (that I know of anyway–they did plant a few non-native examples in King George Square). Even if Brtisbane did have a dry season, we all know that tropical dry season deciduousness is not the same as continental cold season dormancy.

Native forests in South East Queensland (Brisbane) are predominantly moist eucalypt, open eucalypt, or subtropical rainforest--none of which exhibit any dormancy. Here are some photos I’ve taken of the subtropical rainforest near Brisbane in the middle of winter.










I completely agree that winter dormancy is not particularly notable in Central Florida--which is why I was surprised to see it raised as an issue--but I can assure you it's absent from Brisbane.
I literally view Central Florida and Brisbane as nearly tropical, not the best example of subtropical, I hate how people consider the warmer side the true one. If I knew no classification I would think they are tropical.
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Old 04-08-2024, 08:17 PM
 
43 posts, read 4,771 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Climatepolice48 View Post
I know all of that, nope Florida is not specifically evergreen it is still mixed forests of the temperate forests, it is transitional here to some tropical biomes in south.
This is not true. The environment of central Florida is in the subtropical moist forest biome. The predominant canopy species in the region are broadleaf evergreens, not northern deciduous.

Quote:
I literally live here. The native vegetation of here is mixed, the deciduous here drop their leaves. So it is inaccurate to say it is not at all dormant, I live here it is for a very short period but it happens though not complete either. Southern Florida, well that is another story, it’s deciduos trees do drop leaves but there is no actual dormancy.
Central Florida is dominated by broadleaf evergreens, not temperate deciduous vegetation. Winter dormancy is not a dominant characteristic of the Central Florida environment, though it occurs in some species.

Last edited by jamesja; 04-08-2024 at 08:26 PM..
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Old 04-08-2024, 08:20 PM
 
43 posts, read 4,771 times
Reputation: 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ed's Mountain View Post
Even if Brtisbane did have a dry season, we all know that tropical dry season deciduousness is not the same as continental cold season dormancy.
You ignore this when it comes to plants growing in subtropical or tropical parts of the US, though, so you're just being dishonest.
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Old 04-08-2024, 08:58 PM
 
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
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11 of the 260 New Zealand native trees are deciduous.
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Old 04-08-2024, 09:18 PM
 
Location: Augusta, Ga
397 posts, read 255,156 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Climatepolice48 View Post
No one complains of dormancy in US southeast. Dormancy is not all continental bruh
There's some amount of dormancy and winter growth depending on the plant species, Ed is not sophisticated enough in thought to even contemplate that.

So even though some trees like sweetgum lose their leaves live oaks, long leaf pines, and laurels are still plenty.
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Old 04-09-2024, 08:21 AM
 
Location: Victoria, BC, Canada
5,722 posts, read 3,505,785 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Emman85 View Post
There's some amount of dormancy and winter growth depending on the plant species, Ed is not sophisticated enough in thought to even contemplate that.

So even though some trees like sweetgum lose their leaves live oaks, long leaf pines, and laurels are still plenty.
I did say there was a gradient from north to south. The implication is that places in the middle would not be completely dormant.

You are sophisticated enough in thought to understand that. Where you and I differ is on the amount of dormancy that would be considered significant. Absent clear-cut rules, this is something that arises subjectively from personal experience and expectations.

My perspective is based on the quintessential Australian subtropical climate which has zero dormancy. Coming from that perspective, it doesn't take a huge amount of deciduous trees and brown grass to create a continental vibe.
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