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View Poll Results: Which one is more subtropical?
North Carolina 14 51.85%
North Island NZ 10 37.04%
Both in their way 4 14.81%
None 0 0%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 27. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 04-04-2024, 04:26 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ethereal View Post
Who is talking about Central Florida and "Cfa"?
Look at what Emman85 said - exactly the same logic you are agreeing with for North Carolina applies to Central Florida.

And I'm deliberately substituting with Cfa for the term subtropical to avoid opening any cans of worms.
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Old 04-04-2024, 06:58 AM
 
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Central FL is another beast from NC or anywhere in NZ or Europe. Where I am is technically subtropical but only just barely. Lows of 20+ happen every month of the year. 30+ temps happen in February. It can get cold snaps and freezes but they are far from the defining characteristic of this climate.

Spoiler
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Old 04-04-2024, 07:33 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Space_League View Post
Central FL is another beast from NC or anywhere in NZ or Europe. Where I am is technically subtropical but only just barely. Lows of 20+ happen every month of the year. 30+ temps happen in February. It can get cold snaps and freezes but they are far from the defining characteristic of this climate.
Not in terms of places like Brooksville and Archbold, have you seen the weather boxes? The logic being used applies just as much to such places.

And, even to the place you are talking about, it also applies with the hardiness zone. It's a lower hardiness zone than Auckland - as Emman85 said you have to go to South Florida for most of the 10b.
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Old 04-04-2024, 10:06 AM
 
Location: Augusta, Ga
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Space_League View Post
Central FL is another beast from NC or anywhere in NZ or Europe.
Except Central Florida has lower hardiness than a place like Auckland, a lot of it is in zone 9b with some 10a areas. Auckland can grow more zone 10a/10b plants so by the assumptions of some posters in this thread it is more "subtropical" which is blatantly ridiculous, where do you draw a line that's not completely arbitrary.

Vegetation is an important variable but only one among many others to consider for climate.
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Old 04-04-2024, 10:13 AM
 
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What grows in NZ and cannot grow in Central Florida? Coconuts fruit here near the ocean.. doubt they can in NZ with so little heat
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Old 04-04-2024, 10:22 AM
 
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Also consider red mangrove and other mangrove species growing in Central FL. The air temperature is usually what we consider but water temperatures are much more stable and warm in Central Florida the water stays 'tropical' even in cold snaps. The mangroves here are only hardy to around 18 degrees water temperature which is no issue even during cold snaps. However can the same be said for the north island?
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Old 04-04-2024, 10:30 AM
 
Location: Augusta, Ga
397 posts, read 255,033 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Space_League View Post
What grows in NZ and cannot grow in Central Florida? Coconuts fruit here near the ocean.. doubt they can in NZ with so little heat
There's a lot of crownshaft palms that would be bullet proof in Northern Zealand that could be damaged even in a place like Orlando, they barely grow archontophoenix there while they're everywhere in zone 10b southern California.

Forget some of the other Central Florida places mentioned like Brooksville, FL which is zone 9a.

You don't think there's a difference between an annual mean min of 24 vs 35 or 29 vs 35 lol.
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Old 04-04-2024, 10:58 AM
 
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Well over here the ocean temp rarely ever falls below 20 degrees Celsius. Average winter ocean temp is 22 and summer temp is 29.

Auckland winter sea temperature is like 15 degrees. Even their summer sea temperatures are colder than central Florida's winter temperatures. How can this not have a dramatic impact on which types of marine plants and animals can live in the climate?

The one day of 25f degrees low hardly makes a dent on the ocean temperature since it is buried among many warm to hot winter days
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Old 04-04-2024, 11:10 AM
 
Location: Augusta, Ga
397 posts, read 255,033 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Space_League View Post
Also consider red mangrove and other mangrove species growing in Central FL. The air temperature is usually what we consider but water temperatures are much more stable and warm in Central Florida the water stays 'tropical' even in cold snaps. The mangroves here are only hardy to around 18 degrees water temperature which is no issue even during cold snaps. However can the same be said for the north island?
At the end of the day Northern New Zealand has it's own native mangrove species too even if their water temps are colder.

North Island is very ocean moderated, so it has what I consider a subtropical highland climate, both North Island and most of North Carolina are just out of the geographic subtropics if we consider the edge to be 35 degrees N/S.

North New Zealand is grading towards the cooler summer oceanic end and Western North Carolina is grading towards the colder winter continental end of subtropical.
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Old 04-04-2024, 11:20 AM
 
Location: Augusta, Ga
397 posts, read 255,033 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Space_League View Post
The one day of 25f degrees low hardly makes a dent on the ocean temperature since it is buried among many warm to hot winter days
WHAT..........one 25F low will kill off most 9b+ vegetation, look what happened to Tampa in the 1980s, even freakin queen palms were killed in those freezes. You just mentioned coconut palms, what the heck do you think 25F full exposure would do to one?
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