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Old 05-03-2010, 10:26 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles
40 posts, read 149,425 times
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The east coast's climates are simply too humid for me
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Old 05-04-2010, 01:00 PM
 
Location: New York
11,340 posts, read 17,994,708 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lefteri View Post
The east coast's climates are simply too humid for me
You know I never understood why people say this. It's not humid lol. Maybe I'm just too used to it.

Days like yesterday is what I'd call humid, those don't happen often.
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Old 05-04-2010, 04:21 PM
 
6,046 posts, read 10,445,977 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Infamous92 View Post
You know I never understood why people say this. It's not humid lol. Maybe I'm just too used to it.

Days like yesterday is what I'd call humid, those don't happen often.
It's humid, but some people don't mind it if they're used to it. Even though I live somewhere dry, I am used to humidity and I don't mind it since I grew up with it. I can live somewhere humid or dry though, I care more about temperature.

It seems like if you're used to humidity, you can live somewhere humid or dry. But if you're used to dry, you have a hard time with humidity (at least that's what I've noticed with natives to the area where I live now).
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Old 05-04-2010, 04:26 PM
 
Location: Perth, Western Australia
9,594 posts, read 24,899,787 times
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I also seem to be quite "humidity-tolerant" (dry or muggy)

Recently we had two days in the mid 70's F,
with one day having a dewpoint of 65 F,
and another day dewpoint of 48 F.

I was almost unable to tell the difference between them without looking at the actual weather stats,
yet the weather people on TV were saying how the second day was so much nicer and more comfortable.

In percent,
one day was low-mid 70's F with humidity also in the 70%'s,
the next day was mid 70's F with humidity in the 40% range.

Again, I was almost unable to sense a change in weather from one day to the next.
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Old 05-04-2010, 09:33 PM
 
Location: New York City
2,789 posts, read 5,629,041 times
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I just came from Mexico (near Playa del Carmen) and I think no matter how "humidity-tolerant" you are, you won't like it there. It is so humid, most surfaces feel wet all the time, even if there is no rain due to condensation. Have to be very careful where you sit unless you are wearing a bathing suit. Even the bedsheets indoors feel damp. Imagine a room with an indoor heated pool. That's how it feels all the time.
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Old 05-04-2010, 09:51 PM
 
4,135 posts, read 9,794,296 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lefteri View Post
Which of these are your favorite climates to live in and why? Favorite cities in these climates? What do you feel makes these climates edge out the competition?
I think the person has no idea what they are talking about. I got Dfa: snow (yes), ultra humid (no way) and hot summers (only August, really). It doesn't apply at all.

We have lovely spring and fall here, fairly cool summers except Aug which he applied to all summer ( 70s/80s , somewhat muggy) and the winter is only really "dry" in Jan & Feb.

Today was mid 50s; most days lately have been lovely in the 50s to 70s -- and we are warm this year!

We also have no earthquakes, floods, mudslides, hurricanes or forest fires. Snow melts... I consider it the least of all evils
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Old 05-05-2010, 02:59 AM
 
Location: Bangkok, Thailand
2,688 posts, read 4,270,897 times
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My preference is for a high-end (almost tropical) Cfa (humid subtropical) climate. Northern coastal Florida and Australia's Gold Coast are perfect examples. Summers are hot and humid (but not excessively so) while winters bring cooler (but still not uncomfortably cold) weather. Moderate rainfall ensures that the surroundings aren't too arid, but still allows for plenty of sunshine.
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Old 05-05-2010, 04:51 PM
 
Location: Perth, Western Australia
9,594 posts, read 24,899,787 times
Reputation: 3556
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrMarbles View Post
I just came from Mexico (near Playa del Carmen) and I think no matter how "humidity-tolerant" you are, you won't like it there. It is so humid, most surfaces feel wet all the time, even if there is no rain due to condensation. Have to be very careful where you sit unless you are wearing a bathing suit. Even the bedsheets indoors feel damp. Imagine a room with an indoor heated pool. That's how it feels all the time.
Better than perpetual-cold imho,
but I could see that at least being an occaisional nuisance for tasks/chores
even if I could adapt to that dampness, comfort-wise.

Food would spoil rapidly in a climate like that.
Imagine opening a bag of potato chips and this freshly-opened bag going from crispy-to-rubbery within 5 minutes.
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Old 05-06-2010, 12:01 PM
 
Location: Midwest
4,669 posts, read 4,278,168 times
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I like the humid continental climate, Dfa. Summers are warm and humid, and winters are cold with persistent snow cover. Late Fall & early Spring are cold, but for the most part the transistion seasons (fall & spring) are very comfortable.
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Old 02-02-2011, 08:30 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,682 posts, read 48,292,826 times
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Cfa but with comparatively mild summers, like Sydney.
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