U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Weather
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 02-02-2011, 09:38 PM
 
Location: Toronto
3,338 posts, read 6,148,080 times
Reputation: 2387

Advertisements

My order of ranking of preference would be something like this (a long-winded post, but they're just ideals to think about, at least for the moment being ):

1. Warmer winter forms (so not say, Washington D.C) of, and sunnier forms (so not say, Hong Kong) of Cwa or Cfa's(humid subtropical) or cooler winter versions of Aw or Am (savannah and monsoon).

I'd like to experience mostly heat through the year, but with a somewhat cool season that averages lower than room temperature for a couple or few months for a refresher and to cut the monotony.

Ideally, if there was a hypothetical climate that had even a just month or two where it could possibly snow for a few weeks for the novelty, and then have a couple or few weeks of 40s to 50s F and but then rise back to tropical temperatures rest of the year with guaranteed T-shirt weather the next 10 months, I'd be happy.

But such climate with such a short "refresher" doesn't exist , and therefore I'd make do with those places with winters as "short and cool" as the warmer subtropical climates, with maybe a mountain with snow at high altitudes nearby if I really do want a scenery change.

2. Csa and BWh or BSh -- hot deserts and Mediterranean climates are a plus in that there's still the warmth I crave, but I like to see enough rain at least little greenery to not be depressed (which is why I'd put this one a bit lower on my ranking though it's not a deal-breaker). I don't want too cool of a Med. climate though, like L.A. I'd like real summers with highs at least above 26C/80F for a good chunk of the year.

3. Continental climates of the type D with the hottest and longest summers possible or cold desert/steppe climates of the type B with the shortest winters possible.

So, preferred factors being long and hot summers, blue dome skies and enough rain for the vegetation to look nice (the factors in decreasing order of importance). This goes hand in hand with my "mostly hot all year round with a short brief 'chill' before it's back to hot" ideal. So K.C, Missouri's clime is climactically nicer to me than, say my good ol' native Toronto, which in turn is better than say, Winnipeg (which would be not a better clime than the next category I rank below).

4. Between the non-hot-summer continental climes of D, and the gloomy maritime climes of C, it's a toss up of who has the less extreme cold, better hot summers and sunshine.

Vancouver or London's winters are milder than Halifax, Nova Scotia's and the summers are similar so I'll take the west coasters. But I'd take Nova Scotia over say the real gloomy summerless maritime climates of the islands such as the Faroe islands, Patagonia etc. where the highs don't reach 15C/59F on the summer's hottest month. All of them still beat the boreal subarctic climates though in northern Canada, Siberia, Finland etc for me.

5. The chilly polar climates of type E. Enough said. Though subarctic climates could be just as bad for a good chunk of the year (don't want to face the winters like the Siberian ones even if the summer was (half-)decent)
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-02-2011, 10:28 PM
 
Location: Perth, Western Australia
9,594 posts, read 24,899,787 times
Reputation: 3556
^^ I think South Carolina is the closest place to Toronto with climates starting to match your #1 preferences.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-02-2011, 10:48 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
15,225 posts, read 14,765,631 times
Reputation: 6671
Cfb, preferably subpolar, but regular maritime would suffice.

Dfb works too.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-02-2011, 10:50 PM
 
Location: Toronto
3,338 posts, read 6,148,080 times
Reputation: 2387
Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdCanadian View Post
^^ I think South Carolina is the closest place to Toronto with climates starting to match your #1 preferences.
I guess that makes sense, as once you get to South Carolina it's generally seen as the deep South (as opposed to the upper part of the South).

Anywhere in the US subtropics would probably feel nice just after being used to Toronto, though I don't know how my preferences would change (if at all) if I spent many years in a subtropical climate.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-03-2011, 01:33 AM
 
Location: London, UK
2,702 posts, read 5,205,860 times
Reputation: 1692
For those who mentioned Hong Kong : it is real crap in winter, especially from February where it is absolutely dismal (90 hours of sun in March with 12 hour days) - there are some awesome days (20°C+ and sunny) but what is really annoying is the temperature swings due to the northeast monsoon (10°C maximums are common every winter with bone chilling strong dry winds - you can have a 18°C minimum one week later...).
So I would definitely not chose a climate with a similar winter (though the city itself is awesome but that's a different topic).

Anyway, for me : Aw or Csa.

Either way both a hot summer (at least) and a sunny dry season are guaranteed. Something like Los Angeles (non-coastal) or Miami

My personal hell : Cfc like Iceland or the Antartic Islands. No sun, no heat, ever. Disgusting. Not even talking about E.


By the way, have you guys heard of Dsa/Dsb? It seems really rare, but I spent most of childhood summer and winter holidays in a climate of that kind - my parents used to own a house in the French Alps in southern France, at a quite high elevation but near the Mediterranean. I have no data to support the belief that it was a climate of that kind, but years of experience (and I went back recently a couple of times in that region, after I started being a weather geek) : continuous snow cover in winter with low temperatures (my father told me that he had once recorded a -23°C / -9°F there) and occasional blizzards, wonderfully sunny and rainless summers with slightly chilly nights (when we were there it was 100% outdoors and I can't remember a rainy summer day), if I had to guess I'd say an average of 15-28°C (59-81°F) in July and 13-27°C (55-79°F) in August.
Definitely an interesting climate which seems quite rare worldwide. I wouldn't live in a climate of that kind, but I have never seen a place that could give you such feelings of "real winter" and "real summer" at the same time (especially the likely 300+ hours of monthly sun). Here's a pic I googled from the region around that place : http://www.golf-mediterranee.com/img...taulane-18.jpg

Sorry for the off-topic paragraph
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-03-2011, 03:40 AM
 
Location: Bangkok, Thailand
2,688 posts, read 4,270,897 times
Reputation: 1536
Quote:
Originally Posted by dhdh View Post
For those who mentioned Hong Kong : it is real crap in winter, especially from February where it is absolutely dismal (90 hours of sun in March with 12 hour days) - there are some awesome days (20°C+ and sunny) but what is really annoying is the temperature swings due to the northeast monsoon (10°C maximums are common every winter with bone chilling strong dry winds - you can have a 18°C minimum one week later...).
So I would definitely not chose a climate with a similar winter (though the city itself is awesome but that's a different topic).

Anyway, for me : Aw or Csa.

Either way both a hot summer (at least) and a sunny dry season are guaranteed. Something like Los Angeles (non-coastal) or Miami

My personal hell : Cfc like Iceland or the Antartic Islands. No sun, no heat, ever. Disgusting. Not even talking about E.


By the way, have you guys heard of Dsa/Dsb? It seems really rare, but I spent most of childhood summer and winter holidays in a climate of that kind - my parents used to own a house in the French Alps in southern France, at a quite high elevation but near the Mediterranean. I have no data to support the belief that it was a climate of that kind, but years of experience (and I went back recently a couple of times in that region, after I started being a weather geek) : continuous snow cover in winter with low temperatures (my father told me that he had once recorded a -23°C / -9°F there) and occasional blizzards, wonderfully sunny and rainless summers with slightly chilly nights (when we were there it was 100% outdoors and I can't remember a rainy summer day), if I had to guess I'd say an average of 15-28°C (59-81°F) in July and 13-27°C (55-79°F) in August.
Definitely an interesting climate which seems quite rare worldwide. I wouldn't live in a climate of that kind, but I have never seen a place that could give you such feelings of "real winter" and "real summer" at the same time (especially the likely 300+ hours of monthly sun). Here's a pic I googled from the region around that place : http://www.golf-mediterranee.com/img...taulane-18.jpg

Sorry for the off-topic paragraph
It looks really nice! I'm really interested in the idea of a cold-winter hot-summer continental climate. But it seems that most such climates are biased towards either cool summers or mild winters and those that aren't tend to be very arid.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-03-2011, 06:06 AM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
12,438 posts, read 11,251,407 times
Reputation: 5610
Med climates like Rome or Barcelona hands down. Mild wet winters with warm sunny weather most of the rest of the year.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-03-2011, 06:12 AM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
12,438 posts, read 11,251,407 times
Reputation: 5610
Quote:
Originally Posted by wavehunter007 View Post
I think a far northern (around 22 – 25 latitude) coastal Aw climate like Miami, Rio De Janeiro, Hong Kong (shown as Am on the above map) is as close to perfection as you can get: 12 months of summer, normally sunny beach weather 12 months of the year, a warm/tropical ocean current, breezy, a good wet season for a green and lush environment (May to September in NH), and a nice dry and sunny winter season (November through April in NH). I also agree with ColdCandian that any location that doesn’t have a mean temperature of at least 72 F (22 C) doesn’t even have a real summer. To call a sub 70 F month “summer” seems totally unfair IMO.

Here are the other climates and their biggest drawbacks –

Af (Tropical Rainforest – Amazon, Central Africa…etc) – too long of wet season, too much rain, cloudier (in winter too), high humidity/heat all year and feels worse do to frequent cloud cover.

BWh (Hot Desert – Tucson, Cairo…etc) – too barren, dry, dead looking environment, no green, no life.

Cfa (Humid Subtropical – Charleston, SC, Sydney, Buenos Aires…etc). Nice long summers (5 hot months, 7 warm months) and warm tropical ocean currents, but winters are a bit too cold, with occasional very sharp cold snaps.

Cfb (Subtropical Dry summer, cool summer coastal – San Diego, Perth…etc) - too cool of summers, frigid ocean waters, too wet winters, winters a bit too cold, not green enough, only 2/3 hot months, only 7 warm months.

Dfa (Temperate-warm summer -Chicago, Bucharest, Mukden…etc) - Fleeting summers, only 2/3 hot months, only 4/5 warm months, long , severe cold winters with deep snow and cloudy.

Dfb (Snow –cool summer – Moscow, Fargo, ND, Harbin…etc) –not hot months, only really 4 warm months, very short summers, long, very severe winters with extreme cold (often goes down to 40 F below zero, poor solar angle -too high in latitude (above 45 N/S). Dry and sunny in winter however, is a plus.

E (Polar) – too cold, too dark, no green, little life.
Am sorry but I don't see how you can equate Charleston, SC and Sydney. Has Sydney ever gone below freezing? To me, Sydney's winters are much more like LA's than Charleston. The climates of eastern North America have way too much of a standard deviation from average for my liking.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-03-2011, 06:26 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: NYC
46,070 posts, read 45,078,047 times
Reputation: 14963
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChesterNZ View Post
It looks really nice! I'm really interested in the idea of a cold-winter hot-summer continental climate. But it seems that most such climates are biased towards either cool summers or mild winters and those that aren't tend to be very arid.
Isn't most of the US hot-summers and cold-winters?

The Dsa/b climate also exists in the mountains of the west coast of the US. The mountains of California have a Dsb, dry sunny warm days in the summer where it rains at most a couple times a months. In the winter these places are buried under 10-20 feet of snow (but has been much more!)
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-03-2011, 07:42 AM
 
Location: London, UK
2,702 posts, read 5,205,860 times
Reputation: 1692
I think he meant cold winter dry summer
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Weather
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top