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Old 01-12-2013, 01:21 PM
 
1 posts, read 4,307 times
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We are shopping for homes in Palm Beach Gardens and really like the lot size, views, and home designs in the Thurston, Berwick, and Marlwood neighborhoods of PGA National. The problem is that about 80% of the homes in these neighborhoods seem to be wood frame construction built in the 1980s. I have done some searches on the internet and Citi-Data in particular and most of the comments about wood frames in Florida are very negative, stressing the issues of potential for hurricane damage, termites, and wood rot. There doesn't seem to be a huge differential in the price between CBS and wood frame in PGA National, but the wood frame homes do seem to sit on the market longer. A lot of the wood frame homes in PGA have beautiful upgraded interiors and water or golf course views. Would it be very risky to buy one of these homes due to the potential for damage to the home mentioned above or the risk of not being able to re-sale in a down market? Or could it be that these custom wood frame homes in PGA National may be built to better standards then most of the 80s and 90s frame houses found in the Palm Beach County area?
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Old 01-12-2013, 02:26 PM
 
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Default Just IMHO - I would not. Never have,

never will.
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Old 01-12-2013, 08:31 PM
 
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Wood frame will have higher insurance premiums also due to hurricane/fire losses.

I suspect the lack of price difference has to do with the way the realtors price the listings. They price on square footage, not construction type (hoping the buyers don't know the difference).
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Old 01-13-2013, 12:32 PM
 
Location: Palm Beach County
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I was showing a client the homes you are referring to today, be prepared to do some updating...
They are going to end up in Mirabella, which is a mile or two away, and get a membership in PGA. Little smaller lots, but you get a newer house for the same price as the 1980's homes in PGA.
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Old 01-13-2013, 04:55 PM
 
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As someone else previously mentioned, you will be looking at high insurance premiums for these older homes - especially if the roofs are not up to the latest code. They will require you to not only get a home inspection, but something called a three point inspection. A three point inspection is where they inspect the home to make sure it passes those updated codes. If it does, then it might help lowering your premium, because you will get credit towards your premium for everything to code. Many insurers in Florida are now requiring this three point inspection instead of the standard home inspection.

Personally, I would not purchase a wood frame house. You want to purchase always with a view of being able to sell it later. If they are slow movers on the market, then when the time comes for you to sell it, then it becomes your slow mover. You have many houses to choose from that are concrete block or poured concrete, and those are a lot more structurally sound during a storm than a wood frame house. JMHO
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Old 01-13-2013, 07:47 PM
 
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In a hurricane, it is the roof that is the most important part of a home. The style of your roof will often and probably have more to do with safety in a hurricane than what the walls are made of. Homes do not blow over if made of wood. BIG tornadoes are a different story, of course.

The biggest disadvantages are termites, but termites also attack interior wood framed walls and drywall, as well as roof trusses, etc. of "CBS" homes.

I'm going to copy and paste this guys' list of pros and cons on the subject:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave_n_Tenn
Fact.... 99% of residential construction have "frame (wood) roof". That includes, trusses, rafters, sheathing (plywood).

Fact.......Exterior Walls do not fail in storms... roofs fail.

Fact.... most homes are destroyed by water... water enters through failed roofs, blown out soffits, garage doors, and windows during Hurricanes... or by storm surge, or flooding.... and it's the stuff inside your home that costs the most. Your concrete walls and metal studs will be fine, but your house will be trash.

Fact.... the energy dept ,data shows frame houses have lower energy loss.
(lower energy bills) argue with Uncle Sam on this one.

Fact... Concrete homes are easier to maintain.

Fact ... termites eat wood

Fact.... termites eat wood inside concrete homes... see note on roofs above

Fact... Insurance companies give lower rates to concrete homes.

Fact... wood burns

Fact... watch the roof burn and the walls, and the furniture, etc.

Fact....... after the fire... replace the concrete block

Fact ... Concrete homes are "wetter" (damp) than frame homes.

Fact.... older concrete block homes offer less protection than older frame homes. Why? 'cause older block homes did not use re-bar in the walls and did not pour a tie-beam... making them extremely brittle, and not reinforced.
Hence the reason you MUST reinforce concrete.

Fact... frame homes are easier to "modify" or add on.
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Old 01-15-2013, 05:36 AM
 
17,307 posts, read 22,039,209 times
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I recently visited a wood frame house where the walls were rotted (T111 painted plywood). You could push your finger through the wood like it was paper and the house was built in the late 80s. If it was this bad on an exterior wall, I can't imagine what the inside is like!
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Old 01-15-2013, 05:57 AM
 
17,291 posts, read 29,399,972 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by City Guy997S View Post
I recently visited a wood frame house where the walls were rotted (T111 painted plywood). You could push your finger through the wood like it was paper and the house was built in the late 80s. If it was this bad on an exterior wall, I can't imagine what the inside is like!

T111 is awful stuff.

The geniuses who remodeled my current home replaced original clapboard siding with T111 that they hung HORIZONTALLY.


Needless to say, I put hardiplank up as soon as I could.
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Old 01-15-2013, 10:28 AM
 
355 posts, read 913,244 times
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Off-topic. How expensive was it to add the Hardiplank?
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Old 01-15-2013, 11:28 AM
 
17,291 posts, read 29,399,972 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jgreco5 View Post
Off-topic. How expensive was it to add the Hardiplank?
The whole project was between 13k-15k, with painting.
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