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Old 02-21-2015, 01:54 PM
 
Location: Sandy Springs, GA
733 posts, read 1,304,683 times
Reputation: 596

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Quote:
Originally Posted by cheriex333 View Post
Are you ON board or NOT on board with All Aboard Florida? Why or why not?

All Aboard Florida | West Palm Beach | Fort Lauderdale | Moss & Associates

The main complaints I'm reading are the impact to neighborhoods (noise, traffic, businesses). Is All Aboard a commuter or freight train? I'm accustomed to the metro trains in the DC area which are electric (quiet), and do not impact traffic due to separate rail lines. In fact, most homes close to a metro station are usually higher valued.

How is All Aboard Florida different from Amtrak which currently connects Central to South FL?
AAF does not have to worry about track ownership (right-of-way) which will limit delays whereas Amtrak's priority is superseded by the freight companies on the rails in which Amtrak doesn't own but operates on.
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Old 02-23-2015, 11:44 AM
PDF
 
11,396 posts, read 13,440,746 times
Reputation: 6707
Gee, I had heard about All Aboard Florida a few months back but never really knew what it was or what it was about. I have to say, now I'm really excited for it! I never thought something like this and SunRail could get funded. Just reading up on it makes me happy to be back in Florida.
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Old 02-23-2015, 07:59 PM
 
1,905 posts, read 2,794,861 times
Reputation: 1086
Quote:
Originally Posted by PDF View Post
Gee, I had heard about All Aboard Florida a few months back but never really knew what it was or what it was about. I have to say, now I'm really excited for it! I never thought something like this and SunRail could get funded. Just reading up on it makes me happy to be back in Florida.
I was hesitant at first but now I'm really happy something likes this is getting built.
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Old 03-12-2015, 01:45 AM
 
Location: Berwick, Penna.
16,216 posts, read 11,359,246 times
Reputation: 20833
I hold a degree in Logistics/Transportation, and will admit to a long-time hobby interest in railroading, but I haven't followed All Aboard Florida all that much until recently because, frankly, I believed the economic "deck" was stacked against it.

A bit of history is in order: AAF is the successor to, and managed by the Florida East Coat Railroad. FEC was, in turn developed by real estate and tourism magnate Henry Flagler in the early Twentieth Century, and at one time went all the way to Key West via what would become the Overseas Highway. The Depression of the Thirties, the hurricane of 1935, and the effects of the automobile on the tourist trade all combined to drive the railroad into receivership, and it survived until the Sixties mostly on freight service.

In the early Sixties, economic desperation led the FEC to operate without a union contract -- something that was possible only because its within-one-state operation allowed it to avoid federal intervention. What passenger traffic was left found its way into South Florida on other routes -- now part of CSX -- and relieved of the high (at the time) overhead of passenger carriage, the system's finances stabilized -- twenty years before the Staggers Act (deregulation) would be a factor in the revival of the rest of the rail industry.

Rail passenger service, particularly for commuters and short-to-intermediate distances, has shown signs of a revival in recent years, as evidenced by the recent launch (after much controversy) of a West Coast "High Speed Rail" system intended to build upon what has been a slow, but continuous improvement in service on the East Coast between Portland, ME, and Norfolk, VA. But it is in no way comparable to the faster, more successful, and built-from-scratch systems showcased in France and Japan.

So my guess is that the Powers That Be at FEC/AAF are betting that their lower labor costs and relaxed work rules, combined with increasing population density in Central and South Florida will enable them to match Amtrak's Acela and the emerging California "HSR" proposal. If the system works (and it will not (immediately) see the drastic changes forecast by either its proponents or detractors) it can take its place among a number of other projects which have broadened the prospects for a continued, but gradual, improvement in rail travel.

If not, It may have some prospects if the completion of the PANAMX project (widening and deepening of the Panama Canal) diverts a substantial potion of the huge Trans-Pacific trade in container shipments to East Coast ports. But Hampton Roads, Charleston and Savannah also have plans here, and its questionable whether the development of Florida as a "land bridge" for container traffic to the interior can be economically justified.

Last edited by 2nd trick op; 03-12-2015 at 01:56 AM..
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Old 03-27-2015, 12:42 PM
 
Location: FIN
888 posts, read 1,593,369 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2nd trick op View Post
So my guess is that the Powers That Be at FEC/AAF are betting that their lower labor costs and relaxed work rules, combined with increasing population density in Central and South Florida will enable them to match Amtrak's Acela and the emerging California "HSR" proposal. If the system works (and it will not (immediately) see the drastic changes forecast by either its proponents or detractors) it can take its place among a number of other projects which have broadened the prospects for a continued, but gradual, improvement in rail travel.

If not, It may have some prospects if the completion of the PANAMX project (widening and deepening of the Panama Canal) diverts a substantial potion of the huge Trans-Pacific trade in container shipments to East Coast ports. But Hampton Roads, Charleston and Savannah also have plans here, and its questionable whether the development of Florida as a "land bridge" for container traffic to the interior can be economically justified.
FEC labor has for long been unionized again. While i'm sure they would be capable of operating such service somewhat to much more efficiently than say, Amtrak, i'm very skeptical that they actually are willing to commit to such project without major public subsidies coming into play. Which i don't blame them for, that seems to be how the game is played in most of the industry these days.

FEC is also a major real estate company. To my knowledge, they own the Miami Union Station and some surrounding properties to name a few. The passenger rail terminal in a city can easily be the hottest piece of real estate in a city, depending on traffic volume and whether it's a multimodal facility.

An interesting project for sure, but for some reason i'm a little skeptical as to if FEC actually has an intention to build and operate a private high speed passenger rail service. I do really hope my doubts are proved wrong, and such a service would prove successful, it would certainly be a moment that would radically transform the industry.
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Old 02-07-2016, 05:29 AM
 
1,759 posts, read 2,169,657 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TriMT7 View Post
It is a passenger train. There are only 4 stops, to keep the trip from becoming nothing more than glorified Amtrak (which takes forever because it stops). However, done right, smaller cities up the coast can find a way to integrate into Tri-Rail, or develop their own light rail connectivity between towns.


The opposition is absolutely shortsighted.

With AAF, the cities have opportunity to get quiet zones implemented (which is THE #1 nuisance of living near train tracks). They also get enhanced safety measures.

It seems that a lot of people in the direct path of it, don't mind the horns as much as the shaking vibration they cause the house - at times the furniture can actually shake.
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Old 02-07-2016, 08:04 AM
 
17,379 posts, read 22,137,311 times
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Plan is being pushed by those that have a financial interest in it, not those that will benefit in it. This is my problem with it

Someone mentioned the Jupiter/Tequesta bridge, the 2nd water bridge issue is in Stuart. The bridges will be closed for the majority of every hour crippling boat traffic on both sides of the bridge.

Three reasons why All Aboard Florida
article has pics
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Old 02-08-2016, 06:19 AM
 
17,291 posts, read 29,435,560 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 071402 View Post
It seems that a lot of people in the direct path of it, don't mind the horns as much as the shaking vibration they cause the house - at times the furniture can actually shake.
The trains that shake the homes are the freight trains. Lighter passenger trains cause little to no vibration in comparison.

And no, the horns are the quality of life issue for the vast majority of people who live in earshot of the trains. Again, I can speak with more authority than most on this issue, where I live inbetween both the CSX and the FEC, and can hear horns from both... AND experience slight vibration (usually only perceptible at night).

It's a price to pay for where I do, central to downtown and close to the water.



One thing I cannot do, however, is complain about it. At least not if I expect to be taken seriously. The tracks were there first. Even in my neighborhood where homes go back to the 1920s! Far more trains used to be run on those tracks as well. Even something like 10-12 years ago they ran more trains than they do now.
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Old 02-08-2016, 06:23 AM
 
17,291 posts, read 29,435,560 times
Reputation: 8691
Quote:
Originally Posted by City Guy997S View Post
Plan is being pushed by those that have a financial interest in it, not those that will benefit in it. This is my problem with it

Someone mentioned the Jupiter/Tequesta bridge, the 2nd water bridge issue is in Stuart. The bridges will be closed for the majority of every hour crippling boat traffic on both sides of the bridge.

Three reasons why All Aboard Florida
article has pics

Sounds like the bridges need an upgrade then. And AAF has already stated that they will coordinate signalization for freight and passenger traffic to minimize boat traffic inconvenience.

But you want to talk about crippling traffic? The other day I had an appointment in Juno Beach. I caught the drawbridge on Donald Ross, making me 10 minutes late for my 4:30.

When I left 30-45 minutes later to go back, the drawbridge was up AGAIN, backing up traffic again.... during RUSH HOUR. Adding a combined 20 - 25 minutes to my trip. Hundreds of people inconvenienced. For a couple of boats.

Never quite see the boating-interest opponents to AAF talking about how THAT affects commerce, or emergency responders. Or the environment!
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Old 02-08-2016, 07:15 AM
 
1,759 posts, read 2,169,657 times
Reputation: 742
Quote:
Originally Posted by TriMT7 View Post
Sounds like the bridges need an upgrade then. And AAF has already stated that they will coordinate signalization for freight and passenger traffic to minimize boat traffic inconvenience.

But you want to talk about crippling traffic? The other day I had an appointment in Juno Beach. I caught the drawbridge on Donald Ross, making me 10 minutes late for my 4:30.

When I left 30-45 minutes later to go back, the drawbridge was up AGAIN, backing up traffic again.... during RUSH HOUR. Adding a combined 20 - 25 minutes to my trip. Hundreds of people inconvenienced. For a couple of boats.

Never quite see the boating-interest opponents to AAF talking about how THAT affects commerce, or emergency responders. Or the environment!
Each time I am there, also 20 minutes, minimum. Where is the discussion on how this will be fixed? The area is becoming more populated. ?
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