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Old 09-24-2020, 10:11 AM
 
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Is there a divide between natives and northeast transplants in terms of employment, and location of homes? Meaning are there certain industries that are predominantly staffed by one or the other, or businesses owned by one or the other. Do some towns/cities feel like its mostly natives/"crackers", or northeast transplants?

I have been watching these YT vloggers from SoFla. They go fishing, hunting in the swamp, snorkeling off Miami Beach, cooking the animals they catch. They also apparently all own boats, and have huge plots of land with livestock on it. With the pandemic and all, seems like a great life. Everyone else stuck inside, and these vloggers get to go on wildlife adventures. Some of the vloggers are Deermeatfordinner, Bluegabe, Kelly Young etc.

One has a huge ranch in Jupiter. I understand that is the furthest North of the South Florida metro area. Will you see more native Floridians to further you move away from Miami, as well as bigger plots of land and farms?

I have also been watching some YT channels that are nothing but showcasing boats coming in and out of the inlets on their way to and from the ocean. Of course large percentage are charter boats. What I noticed from watching the vloggers is the charter/marina business is not giving off the transplant vibe. Is that industry; the fishing, adventure/wildness tourism, boating industry, largely a native floridian industry?
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Old 09-24-2020, 10:37 AM
 
Location: California
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Originally Posted by NJ Brazen_3133 View Post
Is there a divide between natives and northeast transplants in terms of employment, and location of homes? Meaning are there certain industries that are predominantly staffed by one or the other, or businesses owned by one or the other. Do some towns/cities feel like its mostly natives/"crackers", or northeast transplants?

I have been watching these YT vloggers from SoFla. They go fishing, hunting in the swamp, snorkeling off Miami Beach, cooking the animals they catch. They also apparently all own boats, and have huge plots of land with livestock on it. With the pandemic and all, seems like a great life. Everyone else stuck inside, and these vloggers get to go on wildlife adventures. Some of the vloggers are Deermeatfordinner, Bluegabe, Kelly Young etc.

One has a huge ranch in Jupiter. I understand that is the furthest North of the South Florida metro area. Will you see more native Floridians to further you move away from Miami, as well as bigger plots of land and farms?

I have also been watching some YT channels that are nothing but showcasing boats coming in and out of the inlets on their way to and from the ocean. Of course large percentage are charter boats. What I noticed from watching the vloggers is the charter/marina business is not giving off the transplant vibe. Is that industry; the fishing, adventure/wildness tourism, boating industry, largely a native floridian industry?
Actually, the reverse is true: In South Florida, the further south you travel, the more likely you are to encounter Florida natives.

Remember, Broward and Palm Beach counties were very lightly populated until the advent of air-conditioning in residential homes in the 1950's. However, for most of the 20th century, Miami was a decently populated city that included a relatively prominent cohort of multi-generation natives, most of whom had ancestral roots in Alabama, Georgia or South Carolina. In fact, some of the descendants of these early South Florida settlers are still living in select areas of Dade County, especially at Kendall, Pinecrest and the Redlands. If you are interested in hearing stories about Miami in the early 20th century, then I encourage you to listen to these audio recordings: https://search.library.wisc.edu/sear...ordings%5D=yes.

I lived in South Florida for twelve years. During that time, most of the South Florida natives I personally knew originated in Dade County. Of course, many of them had migrated north to Broward and Palm Beach counties in the 1980's and 1990's due to the Hispanicization of Dade County over the past 40-50 years, but very few, if any, were born and raised in Broward or Palm Beach.

Not only has the Hispanicization of Dade County pushed out some long-time non-Hispanic residents, it has also kept transplants from states such as New Jersey and New York at bay. Instead of relocating to Dade County, transplants from other U.S. states usually opt for Broward or Palm Beach counties, which implies that most non-Hispanic white folks in mainland Dade County are Florida natives.

The map at the below-captioned link was created by a Reddit user, so I am uncertain of the validity of the data and, therefore, the authenticity of the map. That said, I find it interesting that the most widely reported ancestry among non-Hispanic white people in Dade County is "American," which is in contrast to the most widely ancestries in Broward and Palm Beach counties (i.e., Italian and German, respectively). However, this map validates my personal experiences in South Florida and reinforces the fact the non-Hispanic white people in Dade County are more culturally similar to those in the Florida Heartland than those in Broward and Palm Beach counties.

Largest Non-Hispanic White Ancestry Group, By County: https://i.redd.it/b7r5uao6ei901.png

For the record, we are talking about a very small and ever-dwindling contingent of the overall population of Dade County, but to deny the cultural crossover with the Florida Heartland counties would be disingenuous at best.

Last edited by Bert_from_back_East; 09-24-2020 at 10:49 AM..
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Old 09-24-2020, 09:15 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Bert_from_back_East View Post
Actually, the reverse is true: In South Florida, the further south you travel, the more likely you are to encounter Florida natives.

Remember, Broward and Palm Beach counties were very lightly populated until the advent of air-conditioning in residential homes in the 1950's. However, for most of the 20th century, Miami was a decently populated city that included a relatively prominent cohort of multi-generation natives, most of whom had ancestral roots in Alabama, Georgia or South Carolina. In fact, some of the descendants of these early South Florida settlers are still living in select areas of Dade County, especially at Kendall, Pinecrest and the Redlands. If you are interested in hearing stories about Miami in the early 20th century, then I encourage you to listen to these audio recordings: https://search.library.wisc.edu/sear...ordings%5D=yes.

I lived in South Florida for twelve years. During that time, most of the South Florida natives I personally knew originated in Dade County. Of course, many of them had migrated north to Broward and Palm Beach counties in the 1980's and 1990's due to the Hispanicization of Dade County over the past 40-50 years, but very few, if any, were born and raised in Broward or Palm Beach.

Not only has the Hispanicization of Dade County pushed out some long-time non-Hispanic residents, it has also kept transplants from states such as New Jersey and New York at bay. Instead of relocating to Dade County, transplants from other U.S. states usually opt for Broward or Palm Beach counties, which implies that most non-Hispanic white folks in mainland Dade County are Florida natives.

The map at the below-captioned link was created by a Reddit user, so I am uncertain of the validity of the data and, therefore, the authenticity of the map. That said, I find it interesting that the most widely reported ancestry among non-Hispanic white people in Dade County is "American," which is in contrast to the most widely ancestries in Broward and Palm Beach counties (i.e., Italian and German, respectively). However, this map validates my personal experiences in South Florida and reinforces the fact the non-Hispanic white people in Dade County are more culturally similar to those in the Florida Heartland than those in Broward and Palm Beach counties.

Largest Non-Hispanic White Ancestry Group, By County: https://i.redd.it/b7r5uao6ei901.png

For the record, we are talking about a very small and ever-dwindling contingent of the overall population of Dade County, but to deny the cultural crossover with the Florida Heartland counties would be disingenuous at best.
What about employment? Do the natives have the boat chartering, and hunting industry in the bag? Basically all the fun non-pretentious stuff.

Also outside of SoFla, are there cities that are more "Florida" or southeastern than SoFla, and Tampa St Pete which I hear is Midwesterners?
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Old 09-25-2020, 03:02 PM
 
Location: California
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Originally Posted by NJ Brazen_3133 View Post
What about employment? Do the natives have the boat chartering, and hunting industry in the bag? Basically all the fun non-pretentious stuff.

Also outside of SoFla, are there cities that are more "Florida" or southeastern than SoFla, and Tampa St Pete which I hear is Midwesterners?
Florida natives work in all kinds of industries. For example, if you are a Jewish-American person who was born and raised in Boca Raton or Delray Beach, then it is likely you are working for your parents or grandparents at their accounting firm, law firm or medical practice.

The only industry in which it seems as if Florida natives are overrepresented given their incredibly small percentage of the state's total population is civil service. In my experience, many politicians and other individuals who work for state, county and city agencies or departments are Florida natives. Some very notable examples include, but are limited to: Katherine Harris, Buddy Dyer, Bob Graham, Ron DeSantis, Marco Rubio, Lawton Chiles (deceased), Tosie Hindman (deceased), Steve Whidden, etc.

In my opinion, the most classically Floridian city located south of Gainesville or Ocala is probably Lakeland.

Last edited by Bert_from_back_East; 09-25-2020 at 03:11 PM..
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Old 09-26-2020, 08:02 AM
 
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This thread is totally wrong fueled by youtube and bad stereotypes.............

If you grew up in the 70s/80s in Boca Raton then your parents likely worked for IBM, as it was the biggest employer in the south end of the county until the early 90s. They had the annual IBM fair (think of it as the greatest carnival you ever attended but it was FREE!). The street I lived on had 5 IBM employees on the 11 house block. IBM moved on and a whole lot of middle management types were suddenly unemployed. IBM offered transfers to NC/TX but not too many took that option.
https://www.ibm.com/ibm/history/exhi...506VV8004.html

Youtube channels are fueled by advertising and sponsors rather than the income these folks generate selling their services to the public. They are at the grocery store just like everyone else, not wandering out to the back 40 acres and catching dinner every night.

Here is a perfect example:

Note in the video they say their videos are only possible due to their patrons (people giving them money). I have met her, she has older boats (that 31 Contender isn't theirs), they live in a modest 150K house out west. I don't know if she actually charters for money (I don't think either have a Capt's license). She appears like she is living the life, but in real life I'd bet she is constantly wondering if next months bills are getting paid just like most people.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hyyu48HVhSU
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Old 09-26-2020, 12:11 PM
 
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Originally Posted by City Guy997S View Post
This thread is totally wrong fueled by youtube and bad stereotypes.............

If you grew up in the 70s/80s in Boca Raton then your parents likely worked for IBM, as it was the biggest employer in the south end of the county until the early 90s. They had the annual IBM fair (think of it as the greatest carnival you ever attended but it was FREE!). The street I lived on had 5 IBM employees on the 11 house block. IBM moved on and a whole lot of middle management types were suddenly unemployed. IBM offered transfers to NC/TX but not too many took that option.
https://www.ibm.com/ibm/history/exhi...506VV8004.html

Youtube channels are fueled by advertising and sponsors rather than the income these folks generate selling their services to the public. They are at the grocery store just like everyone else, not wandering out to the back 40 acres and catching dinner every night.

Here is a perfect example:

Note in the video they say their videos are only possible due to their patrons (people giving them money). I have met her, she has older boats (that 31 Contender isn't theirs), they live in a modest 150K house out west. I don't know if she actually charters for money (I don't think either have a Capt's license). She appears like she is living the life, but in real life I'd bet she is constantly wondering if next months bills are getting paid just like most people.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hyyu48HVhSU
But IBM employment will bring in lots of transplants though wont it? Or else IBM came to Boca Raton because all the talent already there.

Still does not address the question. I am sure the boat chartering/Marina, and the adventure tourism is still a large industry. Florida is known for fun in the sun, and on the water. I sure most people dont own their own boat as it is super expensive, and a lot of work to maintain. I just curious as to whether or not this industry is mostly Florida "native".

I am not asking whether or not florida "native" mostly make their living from YT channels.
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Old 09-26-2020, 01:05 PM
 
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Originally Posted by NJ Brazen_3133 View Post
But IBM employment will bring in lots of transplants though wont it? Or else IBM came to Boca Raton because all the talent already there.

Still does not address the question. I am sure the boat chartering/Marina, and the adventure tourism is still a large industry. Florida is known for fun in the sun, and on the water. I sure most people dont own their own boat as it is super expensive, and a lot of work to maintain. I just curious as to whether or not this industry is mostly Florida "native".

I am not asking whether or not florida "native" mostly make their living from YT channels.

IBM came and went, they likely recruited talent from their other locations.

Marinas/Chartering is a nice fantasy business but not really a huge moneymaker for the amount of work and capital that needs to be invested. You can buy a nice boat for the price of a decent used car, it won't be 40 ft long with 4 engines but it will get you out there.

Unless the marina is family owned for generations, it likely won't necessarily be owned by a native Floridian.



This chain of 11 marinas was assembled by a guy from West Virginia, sold twice in 2 years.

Equity LifeStyle Properties Inc. paid $49 million to purchase Suntex Marina Investors LLC's stake in a joint venture that owns 11 marinas across Florida, thereby becoming the sole owner of the portfolio.

The manufactured home real estate investment trust said it repaid the outstanding debt of approximately $72 million of the Loggerhead Marina portfolio, adding that it financed the transaction with proceeds from its unsecured line of credit
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Old 09-27-2020, 11:44 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by City Guy997S View Post
IBM came and went, they likely recruited talent from their other locations.

Marinas/Chartering is a nice fantasy business but not really a huge moneymaker for the amount of work and capital that needs to be invested. You can buy a nice boat for the price of a decent used car, it won't be 40 ft long with 4 engines but it will get you out there.

Unless the marina is family owned for generations, it likely won't necessarily be owned by a native Floridian.



This chain of 11 marinas was assembled by a guy from West Virginia, sold twice in 2 years.

Equity LifeStyle Properties Inc. paid $49 million to purchase Suntex Marina Investors LLC's stake in a joint venture that owns 11 marinas across Florida, thereby becoming the sole owner of the portfolio.

The manufactured home real estate investment trust said it repaid the outstanding debt of approximately $72 million of the Loggerhead Marina portfolio, adding that it financed the transaction with proceeds from its unsecured line of credit
Ok then ownership of marinas/shipyard RE largely in the hands of the investor class which, who knows where they are from. What about the workers on the boats? I am just curious.
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Old 09-28-2020, 05:38 AM
 
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Originally Posted by NJ Brazen_3133 View Post
Ok then ownership of marinas/shipyard RE largely in the hands of the investor class which, who knows where they are from. What about the workers on the boats? I am just curious.
Kids washing boats/flushing motors $10 an hour

Waxing/cleaning boats $15-20 an hour

Diesel mechanic could make $100 an hour


It is hard work, no fun....... Have you ever visited a marina during summer? Walk in and see how it runs, the only ones having a good day are the customers on the boats. Its not like the guy docks his boat with 10 hot women and then 3 of the women take the dock hand home instead. Dirty/sweaty work for low wages unless you are a specific trade like a diesel mechanic.
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Old 10-19-2020, 01:25 AM
 
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Are you suggesting that Jewish people work for their parents in Florida? That was a pretty stupid comment without a bit of truth. Not one of my Jewish friends works with or for for his/her parents. Sweet Jesus.
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