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Old 06-09-2019, 04:56 AM
 
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WV mountains and the Rocky Mountains are different. I'm not going say what one should like but take Keeneys Creek road to Nuttallburg. This is located in the New River Gorge. The road (in some places barely wide enough for two cars) follows the creek that carves through rock formation with I do not know how many waterfalls. Everything is either rock, water or lush greenery. This has to be one of the most beautiful two lane undeveloped roads in the United States. There are no houses along the drive.

Once to Nuttallburg you have to walk. The sound of the rapids below you is constant. Just past Nuttallburg is Seldom Seen WV. I've asked a few people that tell me that they have been all over WV if they have been to Seldom Seen and they haven't. I don't know why more do not make it there. Now there are no casino's like has ruined places like Central City Colorado. I was there when the attraction was the drive to see the woman painted on the bar room floor. Not all that many people there. From what I have heard the casino's have changed all of that. Nothing against casino's but...........

When I was last in Nuttalburg/Seldom Seen, we had the whole place to ourselves. Just the coal conveyor that runs up the side of the mountain, the remains of the two towns and the sound of the rushing water below.

Life in Seldom Seen was likely pretty rough but what a wonderful spot to have lived.
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Old 06-10-2019, 03:40 PM
 
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Anywhere north of Beckley will only increase your travel time to FL to visit family. Sounds like Beckley will be a good location for you.
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Old 06-10-2019, 03:49 PM
 
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Originally Posted by vantexan View Post
Something about Davis really appealed to me.
There is a four lane road that goes almost to the VA state line from the top of the mountain there at Davis. It will eventually be four lane to the state line but VA is not cooperating on their end so you would have a short piece of two lane over to I-81 and then you can connect to 66 rather easily.

If you come back that way, stay at the Canaan Valley Lodge and spend at evening at the Purple Fiddle (located in Thomas) listening to some music for a very reasonable cover charge.
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Old 06-10-2019, 04:07 PM
 
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Originally Posted by bballjunkie View Post
There is a four lane road that goes almost to the VA state line from the top of the mountain there at Davis. It will eventually be four lane to the state line but VA is not cooperating on their end so you would have a short piece of two lane over to I-81 and then you can connect to 66 rather easily.

If you come back that way, stay at the Canaan Valley Lodge and spend at evening at the Purple Fiddle (located in Thomas) listening to some music for a very reasonable cover charge.
If not Elkins, Davis would be a good place to retire. (For me)
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Old 06-10-2019, 04:20 PM
 
Location: elkins wv
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I agree with staying at Canaan Valley State Park. A beautiful area with a new lodge. I worked there in high school and college. The Purple Fiddle is a great place and that area has a lot to offer. You really wouldn't go wrong in at least 10-15 towns. All either have amenities or are within 1-3 hours of major cities.
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Old 06-10-2019, 08:56 PM
 
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Originally Posted by vantexan View Post
They call them the Rockies for a reason, very rocky terrain. I prefer the lushness of the Appalachians. Some pretty awe inspiring mountains out West, but that wears off over time. I'd rather look at a grassy cow pasture surrounded by heavily wooded mountains. Some very nice streams out West as long as the snow is melting, but I prefer year round streams and creeks. Until I drove up I-77 about a month ago didn't realize just how much I liked it.
The Rockies are gorgeous, but the best, and by far highest base to summit mountains out West are not the Rockies. Not even close. The Cascade/Coastal Ranges in California, Oregon, and Washington State have mountains that start out at near sea level and rise to well over 14,000 feet. Those are spectacular. I will say this though … for sheer beauty and open spaces, the American West is unmatched.


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Old 06-11-2019, 12:29 PM
 
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Originally Posted by CTMountaineer View Post
The Rockies are gorgeous, but the best, and by far highest base to summit mountains out West are not the Rockies. Not even close. The Cascade/Coastal Ranges in California, Oregon, and Washington State have mountains that start out at near sea level and rise to well over 14,000 feet. Those are spectacular. I will say this though … for sheer beauty and open spaces, the American West is unmatched.


https://www.bing.com/search?q=10+hig...FORM=QBRE&sp=5
I spent 7 months in 4 former Soviet Republics last year and two months recently in Colombia. The West end of the Himalayas, the Caucuses, and the Andes are all spectacular. Lived in Seattle too, loved Mt.Rainier and the Cascades, from Washington into Northern California, and the Olympics. But you aren't going to find something similar to Appalachian culture out there, and Pacific Northwest weather is depressing.
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Old 06-11-2019, 03:36 PM
 
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Originally Posted by vantexan View Post
I spent 7 months in 4 former Soviet Republics last year and two months recently in Colombia. The West end of the Himalayas, the Caucuses, and the Andes are all spectacular. Lived in Seattle too, loved Mt.Rainier and the Cascades, from Washington into Northern California, and the Olympics. But you aren't going to find something similar to Appalachian culture out there, and Pacific Northwest weather is depressing.
I agree with that, but the combination of the mountains and the Pacific in one place is definitely special as far as scenery is concerned.
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Old 06-12-2019, 07:14 PM
 
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Originally Posted by CTMountaineer View Post
I agree with that, but the combination of the mountains and the Pacific in one place is definitely special as far as scenery is concerned.
Check out Santa Marta, Colombia. Backed by the world highest coastal range. I believe some peaks are over 18,000'.
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Old 06-15-2019, 09:56 PM
 
Location: Washington, WV
278 posts, read 400,465 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CTMountaineer View Post
The Rockies are gorgeous, but the best, and by far highest base to summit mountains out West are not the Rockies. Not even close. The Cascade/Coastal Ranges in California, Oregon, and Washington State have mountains that start out at near sea level and rise to well over 14,000 feet. Those are spectacular. I will say this though … for sheer beauty and open spaces, the American West is unmatched.


https://www.bing.com/search?q=10+hig...FORM=QBRE&sp=5
West Virginia and the eastern mountains n general are very nice in their own way too, just on a much smaller scale than the Rockies, Sierras, or Cascades.. Those mountains are like comparing a hill in Ohio to Spruce Knob. Ths first time I saw Rainier I was absolutely blown away by its size and beauty. It didnt seem real. In West Virginia I think some of our most dramatic and best highlands are the Black Mountains west of Marlinton. I remember a guy originally from Wyoming who used to bike ride and camp near Cranberry say that it reminded him a little of Wyoming.
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