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Old 11-29-2019, 01:54 PM
 
527 posts, read 187,326 times
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Thanks for all the info, it's been very helpful. So far I've been looking at places online but shortly will head to see them in person.

Marlington does have 4G cell coverage, seems like, and quite a few areas outside of it, along the 219 corridor, at least according to ATT coverage tool. May be some Sprint too.

Water well situation still isn't clear to me, still, haven't talked to drillers, but I noticed that there're a few properties without wells in Franklin area. They have cisterns, at least some of them are on spring-fed cisterns. I'm not sure if anyone has to haul water there. I guess drilling wells was too expensive, water runs too deep and drilling through harder rocks costs... I wonder if there're issues with hard water in the whole area. In Western VA right over the border, seems like some very hard (iron) water.

Something I wonder about is mosquitoes. If a place has a pond and/or neighbors or community has ponds nearby, does it mean you're going to get eaten alive by bugs in summer? So far I've been crossing places around any ponds off my list.
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Old 11-29-2019, 02:20 PM
 
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Another thing I'm wondering about....as I look at listings North of Marlington and all the way towards hwy 50, I'm noticing quite a few with CC&Rs.
I wonder why so much land with CC&Rs, what are they prohibiting usually?
Seems like most of them at least allow hunting and shooting.
Are they usually allowing livestock, not the whole farm but few animals, may be a cow and a couple of goats and sheep?
I do want to have a couple of pigs...
I wonder if I should avoid CC&R places.
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Old 11-30-2019, 05:48 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by opossum1 View Post
Yes, I know very well what I'm talking about. There're places in the lower 48 with 3 hr drive to any grocery store, WV isn't that, really. Northwestern VA is a very fast paced place and anything close to 81 will be. I'm looking for something like Eastern Kentucky mountains in terms of vibes. It's not about being really remote, it's about places where certain stuff from big cities didn't make it yet. My life is spent holed up on the property or in the woods somewhere and I don't venture into social scenes really, also - don't need to be where other transplants are, as soon as the locals are nice. I'm mind my own business type of person... Not sure what you meant by attitudes.

Just curious about wells and sinkholes. WV doesn't have public well log online database.
I would also recommend you at least look around Berkeley Springs, Great Cacapon and Paw Paw. Distances are deceiving as 30 miles can mean an hour drive. Not sure about the snow but if you want a place really remote with no people I can almost guarantee there is a reason nobody is there.

I am from Northern Minnesota so understand very well the kind of experience or place you are seeking. However that sort of remote doesn't exist without snow. You could probably find somewhere in the areas I suggested down a small dirt road where you would find pockets of seclusion.

I have looked around Elkins and areas below the national forest and didn't find the towns or real estate very attractive.

There is a little place called Whitmer if I remember correctly. It is down in a valley along a stream. It goes up to the dispersed camping sites on the way to Spruce Knob campground. There are a ton of remote dirt roads going east too Seneca. It is very remote there and you might find valleys without snow. The question is do you require sunlight?

As I said areas without people do not have people for a reason you have to remember you are nearly on the East Coast. Out of all the places I saw in that half of the state made me think Berkeley Springs, Cacapon was a good location. Anywhere in Green Mountain state forest could be the seclusion you are after.
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Old 11-30-2019, 06:39 PM
 
Location: Cumberland
5,260 posts, read 8,464,262 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by opossum1 View Post
Thanks for all the info, it's been very helpful. So far I've been looking at places online but shortly will head to see them in person.

Marlington does have 4G cell coverage, seems like, and quite a few areas outside of it, along the 219 corridor, at least according to ATT coverage tool. May be some Sprint too.

Water well situation still isn't clear to me, still, haven't talked to drillers, but I noticed that there're a few properties without wells in Franklin area. They have cisterns, at least some of them are on spring-fed cisterns. I'm not sure if anyone has to haul water there. I guess drilling wells was too expensive, water runs too deep and drilling through harder rocks costs... I wonder if there're issues with hard water in the whole area. In Western VA right over the border, seems like some very hard (iron) water.

Something I wonder about is mosquitoes. If a place has a pond and/or neighbors or community has ponds nearby, does it mean you're going to get eaten alive by bugs in summer? So far I've been crossing places around any ponds off my list.
I hate to keep answering questions with questions, but do you have experience in the deciduous woodlands of Central Appalachia? Mosquitoes abound, you don't need to be near a pond to get bitten up.They breed perfectly fine in the natural puddles and pools in the forest that are filled by normal spring/summer/fall rains. The woods in general around here are very buggy places. Flies, gnats, mosquitoes, and ticks are part and parcel of the experience, they can't really be avoided.

Do you mind if I ask where you are from and what experience you have living in rural places on the east coast? I mean, if you are from Florida the bugs will be a joke compared to what you are used to. If you live in high desert, there will be many more insects compared to what you are used to. Some of these questions are best answered if we know your existing frame of reference.
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Old 12-01-2019, 07:44 AM
 
527 posts, read 187,326 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lookingaround12345 View Post
I would also recommend you at least look around Berkeley Springs, Great Cacapon and Paw Paw. Distances are deceiving as 30 miles can mean an hour drive. Not sure about the snow but if you want a place really remote with no people I can almost guarantee there is a reason nobody is there.

I am from Northern Minnesota so understand very well the kind of experience or place you are seeking. However that sort of remote doesn't exist without snow. You could probably find somewhere in the areas I suggested down a small dirt road where you would find pockets of seclusion.

I have looked around Elkins and areas below the national forest and didn't find the towns or real estate very attractive.

There is a little place called Whitmer if I remember correctly. It is down in a valley along a stream. It goes up to the dispersed camping sites on the way to Spruce Knob campground. There are a ton of remote dirt roads going east too Seneca. It is very remote there and you might find valleys without snow. The question is do you require sunlight?

As I said areas without people do not have people for a reason you have to remember you are nearly on the East Coast. Out of all the places I saw in that half of the state made me think Berkeley Springs, Cacapon was a good location. Anywhere in Green Mountain state forest could be the seclusion you are after.
Yes, I know short distances can take a long time to drive in these mountains on the winding roads...
I'm not really looking for very remote, secluded place without cell signal (one can get this by buying a good hunting camp suitable for full-time living, basically), but rather a quiet, peaceful area that isn't being developed. There can be quite a difference between the two...
If area is surrounded by National Forest that is very close, for example, it might not be up for development.
As to Elkins...seems like much snow there. Yes, I'm looking for a place with some sunlight, and I understand down in the canyon type of location might not be getting much.
As you mention, quality of houses can be an issue, so I'm looking all over from South to North on the Eastern side of the mountains, as soon as it's close to National Forest lands including NFS on Virginia side, not just WV forest lands. There's Virginia-side NFS land right along some of the Southern WV border.

Last edited by opossum1; 12-01-2019 at 08:33 AM..
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Old 12-01-2019, 07:54 AM
 
527 posts, read 187,326 times
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Originally Posted by westsideboy View Post
I hate to keep answering questions with questions, but do you have experience in the deciduous woodlands of Central Appalachia? Mosquitoes abound, you don't need to be near a pond to get bitten up.They breed perfectly fine in the natural puddles and pools in the forest that are filled by normal spring/summer/fall rains. The woods in general around here are very buggy places. Flies, gnats, mosquitoes, and ticks are part and parcel of the experience, they can't really be avoided.

Do you mind if I ask where you are from and what experience you have living in rural places on the east coast? I mean, if you are from Florida the bugs will be a joke compared to what you are used to. If you live in high desert, there will be many more insects compared to what you are used to. Some of these questions are best answered if we know your existing frame of reference.
I spent time in Eastern Kentucky part of Appalachia (July and August), near National Forest but there were other properties along the road.
On most days I had not been bitten by any mosquitos - only after rain.
Neighbor did have a smallish pond accross the street, but still no mosquitos. Windows were open all the time starting evening without screens, I often kept the doors wide open. The lot didn't have much clearing, so forest started very close behind the house, followed by National forest land right where the lot ended. Lot was never sprayed.
Have not been bitten by single gnat either.
I spent time in summer in other, flatter parts Kentucky and did have gnats biting at some point (after hay was baled, I think they came out of grass) but generally I spent lots of time on the porch, in fact I slept on a deck every night, and had not been bitten by anything other than after they baled the hay and gnats came up...
I never use any repellents.
I spent more time in the Missouri Ozarks and Vermont mountains in summers, in very rural locations (70 or so acres lots, much forest) slept on a porch or in wide-open tent every day never got bit by a single bug. I literally lived outside in Vermont mountains (August) in fact and nothing ever bit me... I also slept outside on a deck in Central PA Appalachia area and didn't get bit by anything, even though it was a cow farm and there should be flies, and camped in Central PA mountains 2nd half of summer and didn't get a single bite (the only bugs I saw were non-biting gnats flying).

I had mosquito issues only in Maine, Michigan UP, Minnesota woods so far (I was eaten alive and not looking forward to this again), and some in North WY.
Ticks are a different story but they don't come biting on the deck or into the house, really.

More on the frame of reference....I did live and spent time camping all over the states in the past, including 2 years in Central VA (but that was in-town)... I have to say I had lots of mosquito issues in Wyoming mountains and rural Kansas (close to lake with swampy areas), but nothing remotely close to Maine/MN/Michigan UP. In the Eastern rural places South of Maine honestly I saw a lot less flying bugs than in dry WY forest where I also got bit by biting flies a lot. Seen very bad mosquitos on the edge of high desert around CA/NV border - there was small swampy flat valley around the creek not too far.

There can be a big difference between being on a low land close to water body that has swampy areas and in drier upland with good drainage over large area and no surface water, I guess. I think I don't want to be close to any creeks or lakes.

Are you saying mosquito situation is going to be very different from Eastern KY mountains?
The homes for sale in WV had big porches obviously enjoyed by residents but no screened porches... my guess is mosquitoes were bad I'd see some screened porches/decks like one can see in Maine?

Last edited by opossum1; 12-01-2019 at 09:08 AM..
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Old 12-01-2019, 09:24 AM
 
Location: Cumberland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by opossum1 View Post
I spent time in Eastern Kentucky part of Appalachia (July and August), near National Forest but there were other properties along the road.
On most days I had not been bitten by any mosquitos - only after rain.
Neighbor did have a smallish pond accross the street, but still no mosquitos. Windows were open all the time starting evening without screens, I often kept the doors wide open. The lot didn't have much clearing, so forest started very close behind the house, followed by National forest land right where the lot ended. Lot was never sprayed.
Have not been bitten by single gnat either.
I spent time in summer in other, flatter parts Kentucky and did have gnats biting at some point (after hay was baled, I think they came out of grass) but generally I spent lots of time on the porch, in fact I slept on a deck every night, and had not been bitten by anything other than after they baled the hay and gnats came up...
I never use any repellents.
I spent more time in the Missouri Ozarks and Vermont mountains in summers, in very rural locations (70 or so acres lots, much forest) slept on a porch or in wide-open tent every day never got bit by a single bug. I literally lived outside in Vermont mountains (August) in fact and nothing ever bit me... I also slept outside on a deck in Central PA Appalachia area and didn't get bit by anything, even though it was a cow farm and there should be flies, and camped in Central PA mountains 2nd half of summer and didn't get a single bite (the only bugs I saw were non-biting gnats flying).

I had mosquito issues only in Maine, Michigan UP, Minnesota woods so far (I was eaten alive and not looking forward to this again), and some in North WY.
Ticks are a different story but they don't come biting on the deck or into the house, really.

More on the frame of reference....I did live and spent time camping all over the states in the past, including 2 years in Central VA (but that was in-town)... I have to say I had lots of mosquito issues in Wyoming mountains and rural Kansas (close to lake with swampy areas), but nothing remotely close to Maine/MN/Michigan UP. In the Eastern rural places South of Maine honestly I saw a lot less flying bugs than in dry WY forest where I also got bit by biting flies a lot. Seen very bad mosquitos on the edge of high desert around CA/NV border - there was small swampy flat valley around the creek not too far.

There can be a big difference between being on a low land close to water body that has swampy areas and in drier upland with good drainage over large area and no surface water, I guess. I think I don't want to be close to any creeks or lakes.

Are you saying mosquito situation is going to be very different from Eastern KY mountains?
The homes for sale in WV had big porches obviously enjoyed by residents but no screened porches... my guess is mosquitoes were bad I'd see some screened porches/decks like one can see in Maine?
No, Eastern KY should be a good comp. You know to avoid swamps and have been in much buggier places overall. Your overall goal of avoiding surface water near your property should cut down on the bugs if you enjoy sleeping outside. Watch out for deer ticks though, although I assume you have experience with them as well.

FWIW, I could never get away with that. They blood suckers love me.
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Old 12-01-2019, 09:46 AM
 
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Originally Posted by westsideboy View Post
No, Eastern KY should be a good comp. You know to avoid swamps and have been in much buggier places overall. Your overall goal of avoiding surface water near your property should cut down on the bugs if you enjoy sleeping outside. Watch out for deer ticks though, although I assume you have experience with them as well.

FWIW, I could never get away with that. They blood suckers love me.
I do eat garlic powder almost every day...add it to food for flavor, not as repellent but may be it does repel bugs to some degree like they say. It didn't do much against Maine, MN and Northern Michigan bugs, though....may be too many of them. I recall one guy who hiked entire Appalachian trail said he found eating garlic was the best against bugs.

Another thing, I found mosquitos behave differently in different regions...I've spent a month in Northern Idaho in a place right on the pond with much waist-high un-mowed grass around it - but there'd be no mosquito bites unless you sit right over the pond on a dock, you could spend all the time outside 10 feet from that pond not seeing a mosquito. In other places I've seen mosquitoes fly very far, even over the desert, from ponds where they breed.

Last edited by opossum1; 12-01-2019 at 10:16 AM..
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Old 12-01-2019, 01:52 PM
 
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The chicken houses that's been mentioned here (poultry farms) - I'm seeing a few of them from satellite in Petersburg and Moorfield area. How far one has to be from those to avoid smell? Mostly seeing from 1 to about 8 chicken barns in each spot. The smell is supposed to go for miles, 1-2 miles for sure but not sure how many barns should be there for it to travel for miles. Don't see any waste ponds around those.
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Old 12-01-2019, 03:59 PM
 
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Also what is your price point? This will dictate where you can go.
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