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Old 03-29-2020, 12:04 PM
 
228 posts, read 90,526 times
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In WV I've seen a lot of homes perched right under very steep mountainsides, which looks like landslide potential.
Apparently, home insurance companies do not provide landslide coverage in WV.
I'm curious, are there actual cases of homes being destroyed/damaged because they were built under the slopes or is this really unheard of?
I'd also think that if mountain slope isn't logged/cleared, this really helps against landslide risk?


Also, about sinkholes....in WV home insurance doesn't insure against them (unless they're caused by mining).
I was very surprised to learn that in Lewisburg, the city hall building nearly collapsed into a sinkhole and I think I read entire Lewisburg had been built upon giant shallow sinkhole. There're some happening in Monroe county, also. These are natural limestone sinkholes, I'm not talking about the ones related to coal mining.
I do have access to online map which shows were relevant limestone terrain is but not sure about the accuracy...
How do residents handle this? Do they just pray their house won't end up being damaged by one?
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Old 03-30-2020, 08:05 AM
 
Location: Ohio via WV
562 posts, read 527,861 times
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Landslides are quite common in WV. No it doesn't matter if the hill is logged or not, they can happen regardless. Usually you notice them when they cover a road or fall out beneath a road. There are examples of them taking out houses, but don't build or buy beneath a steep hill and you'll be fine.

Sinkholes are only typically a problem in the "mountain" counties with large limestone deposits like Greenbrier, Pocahontas, Randolph, Tucker, Pendleton, Grant, Mineral, etc. and into the eastern panhandle (Jefferson, Berkeley, Morgan). And no, it's not a concern to 99.9% of people. Sinkholes don't just typically open up all the time. It's like worrying about a tornado in WV, it's just not a concern to put any thought into.
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Old 03-30-2020, 08:53 AM
 
228 posts, read 90,526 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 304eer View Post
Landslides are quite common in WV. No it doesn't matter if the hill is logged or not, they can happen regardless. Usually you notice them when they cover a road or fall out beneath a road. There are examples of them taking out houses, but don't build or buy beneath a steep hill and you'll be fine.
This is what I was thinking... I was looking at one house for sale that is right under a hill that's way too steep in my view to build under. But if the slide happens, I guess it could take over quite a bit of land underneath the hill too, so I really wonder what would be the reasonable distance for the house from the steep hillside.


That particular house was built in the 2000s, so most likely there was engineering study done on the landslide risk subject before they pulled the permit - I'm not sure, though. Don't know if this would be required...may be should look at the original building permit papers, but right now due to shut down one can't go into the clerks office and they don't have online access system. The hill is forested. I understand that forested hillsides do slide (just if it's logged and tree roots are rotten/gone, it can make the surface hold together less)

I guess it if doesn't feel right when you look at it, may be it's not right. It might be safe, but you won't have peace about it living there.


Quote:
Originally Posted by 304eer View Post
Sinkholes are only typically a problem in the "mountain" counties with large limestone deposits like Greenbrier, Pocahontas, Randolph, Tucker, Pendleton, Grant, Mineral, etc. and into the eastern panhandle (Jefferson, Berkeley, Morgan). And no, it's not a concern to 99.9% of people. Sinkholes don't just typically open up all the time. It's like worrying about a tornado in WV, it's just not a concern to put any thought into.
I see - I guess not that frequent issue. I was looking for a house in one of the counties you mentioned, though.
It's weird to read that the city hall actually has a sinkhole open up right by its wall. I guess the best I can do is look on that online geology map and make sure the house is not located in one of the limestone areas. They seem to be spotty and not the whole county being one.

Regarding tornados....I do realize they happen in WV sometimes though not that often (and there was very deadly big one back in 1940s), so I think would prefer a place with some kind of basement.

Last edited by worldcitizen10; 03-30-2020 at 09:01 AM..
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Old 03-30-2020, 02:29 PM
 
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My parents' home suffered some damage to a basement wall due to mine subsidence, and the remediation/repairs were paid for by some federal program—I can't remember which agency was responsible.
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Old 03-30-2020, 06:09 PM
 
228 posts, read 90,526 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sharon Music View Post
My parents' home suffered some damage to a basement wall due to mine subsidence, and the remediation/repairs were paid for by some federal program—I can't remember which agency was responsible.
I know of people whose sell and foundation were damaged by mine sinkole and they didn't get paid. May be it happened before some program went into effect.
Home insurance in WV supposedly includes mine related subsidence (at least a couple of companies I talked to said this), but not natural one, such as limestone.
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