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Old 01-13-2010, 02:14 AM
 
11,944 posts, read 13,186,086 times
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My gut is telling me these hydraulic hose shouldn't be so prone to rupture if top of the line and are in need of chaffing gear. Depending on the hose size (you're saying huge, how huge?) a spent 2 1/2" fire hose serving as a loose sleeve over the hydraulic hose would serve 2 purposes. Prevent chaffing and slow down the discharge in loose encapsulation long enough to get to a kill switch.

Administrative control through policy... Statistically averaging a shelf life of these hoses can put them out of service scheduled maint. that reduces the frequency of catastrophic failure. Sort of like having a 100k rated car but taking it out of service for pasture at 75k so it never breaks down on the highway. Costs a little more for the artificial shelf life reduction but saves big on price tag of emergencies. Operating at elevated PSI's enough to cut someone-- this sounds like steam fitter consultation, because that's beyond my experience. That's the lead I'd follow to crack this nut. Hope that reaches the right ears.

There's a solution to all things, just a matter of how much it's going to cost, and how much of a PITA it's going to be to implement. Toxic exposures= costly beyond belief, unacceptable.
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Old 01-13-2010, 05:45 PM
 
4,714 posts, read 12,162,402 times
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1/2", 3/4", and 1 1/2" larger hoses are covered with protective wraps...

This is a 200 million dollar machine we are speaking of...no corners are cut on the mechanical end...

That block of coal is 9' high, 1500 feet wide and 3 miles long...when it is mined out the machine is junk.
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Old 01-13-2010, 06:50 PM
 
11,944 posts, read 13,186,086 times
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Ooopsie, got distracted and forgot to post this suggestion too...
The gear you're using is so exclusive that for the most part you're their prime customer. Whomever is making these hydraulic hoses needs to tap on their engineers shoulders to solve some things. I've always had a sweet spot for engineers, goofy as they are, the unsung hero's of operations.

Whatever protective wrap in use now isn't functional if spraying oil results. Shall I bake cupcakes, batt my eyelashes, and whisper sweet hydraulic lines to the engineers? I do enjoy my work.
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Old 01-14-2010, 01:23 AM
 
4,714 posts, read 12,162,402 times
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bake those cupcakes...for sure.

Yes, the protective wrap does nothing but reduce abrasion.

And if I were a hydraulic hose maker I would want a limited life for my product...would keep me in business.

Great to have your intelligence back on this blog.
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Old 01-14-2010, 10:27 PM
 
11,944 posts, read 13,186,086 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David Kennedy View Post
bake those cupcakes...for sure.

Yes, the protective wrap does nothing but reduce abrasion.

And if I were a hydraulic hose maker I would want a limited life for my product...would keep me in business.

Great to have your intelligence back on this blog.
Yes but this is where NY way of doing business shines brightest, and everyones boat floats so to speak. Hose maker already has obsolesance on his side, but from legal standpoint if it's 'defective' & putting my men in harms way, he's dead in the water. Work together to solve the problem amicably, nobody gets too greedy, business continues for many happy stable years, prosperity for all. (Ex. greed: AK shot itself in it's own foot wanting 75% of the value of a barrel of crude, and BP canceled it's $300 million plans. They steered for the gulf. Nothing so powerful as voting with your feet.)

This mfg puts my crew in harms way I'll scratch his eyes out, then sig the company lawyer to chase after his company lawyer. So tort reform/ weaken consumer strength, mehhh I don't know, better be careful. I prefer not being toothless. Soften environmental laws, you remove all incentive for the boss to do the right thing. I've had those fights in mgmt, and the math always wins. No doubt you know exactly what I mean because that math rules your biz, and your biz as customer- you're just as dead with flamboyant expense as you are with undervalued sales. We've all got to eat is the bottom line.
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Old 01-16-2010, 07:32 AM
Status: "Flush the turd on Nov 3rd" (set 8 days ago)
 
Location: Lost in Montana *recalculating*...
12,600 posts, read 16,264,881 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David Kennedy View Post
Eventually some small amount of common sense needs to come forth.

and 3-run?

I thought that algae bloom in Dunkard was from those new gas wells being drilled...if it came from Consol I hope the government makes them restore the entire stream...that was some great fishing, even had muskie in it...
Hey-
Just read this a bit ago..

http://wboy.com/story.cfm?func=viewstory&storyid=73461 (broken link)

Quote:
Consolidation Coal Co. resumed discharging high-salinity water Jan. 7 from its Blacksville No. 2 mine into Dunkard Creek north of Morgantown under a state order that gives the company until 2013 to clean up the salts.

Consolidation Coal has argued in the past that removing the salts would be too expensive.

But at the same time, the company is actively constructing a salt-removal system at one of its mines in Virginia.


Both mines’ discharges are high in chlorides, a salt that results from some natural resource extraction processes and that is expensive to remove.

The salty Blacksville No. 2 discharge contributed in the fall of 2009 to a bloom of golden algae that killed as many as 22,000 fish and all of the mussels on more than 38 miles of Dunkard Creek.

The West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection has placed Consolidation Coal under three successive compliance orders beginning in 2004. The orders allow the company to exceed effluent limits aimed at keeping the creek below the state’s acute water quality standard for chlorides of 860 milligrams per liter and its chronic standard of 230 mg/L.

Consolidation began withholding discharges in September, during the kill.

But on Jan. 7, WVDEP allowed the discharge to resume in response to concerns about miner safety based on the presumption that golden algae will not bloom in cold weather. The discharge takes place under a new compliance order that requires treatment by May 2013.

At its Buchanan No. 1 mine in Virginia, the company is building a system designed to treat the very same problem — a plant that went into construction in 2009 and will be in operation this year.

The Virginia treatment plant came about as part of a larger expansion project, according to Cathy St. Clair, public relations manager for parent company CONSOL Energy’s Central Appalachia Operations.

“The availability of water here to run the existing prep plant, especially in dry periods like summer, was a continuing concern,” St. Clair said. “We realized that we were going to need an even greater amount of water for the upgrade, and as a result we opted to build the water treatment facility that we have under construction.”

The plant will use reverse osmosis technology, a filtration method that uses pressure to force the demineralization of water.

As at Blacksville No. 2, the water that will be pumped from the Buchanan No. 1 mine is high-chloride drainage that naturally accumulates in the void spaces left behind by previous mining.

St. Clair said she does not know the cost of the reverse osmosis treatment plant alone. The entire project, with upgrades to the coal prep plant, is estimated at $100 million; annual operations and maintenance costs will not be known until the plant is operating.

The company began the Buchanan project in spring 2009 and is expected to be in testing during the summer of 2010 and in operation by the end of 2010.

It is CONSOL’s first reverse osmosis treatment plant for mine drainage, St. Clair said.

The Buchanan plant’s peak capacity will be 1,600 gallons per minute.

Blacksville No. 2 discharges on average 400 gpm, according to CONSOL spokesman Joe Cerenzia. Asked in early December whether WVDEP has the authority to withdraw CONSOL’s compliance order and require the company to remove the salts from its discharge, a DEP official said only that “the authority is there, but so is the ability to appeal.”

The agency issued a new compliance order on Dec. 18, 2009.
Isn't that special.
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Old 01-17-2010, 02:07 AM
 
11,944 posts, read 13,186,086 times
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Soften environmental laws... some companies honestly have a hard time with compliance and the gov't is pretty amenable, but others are just trying to dodge an expense for as long as they can. Ride on grandfather clauses forever. Clean it up for inspection, the moment the inspector leaves all the springs and rivets pop out of the seams and you're outside the bounds of the law on full time basis. Nobody wants to work for companies like these. Chump attitudes were very costly in NY.

Seems consol has an attitude problem.
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