U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > New York > Westchester County
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 07-13-2010, 07:06 PM
 
123 posts, read 548,736 times
Reputation: 73

Advertisements

I'm looking at houses in Croton-on-Hudson and Yorktown Heights and saw some with septic,oil and well. Can people who have experience comment on the pros and cons. Is it worth buying a house with those systems? thank you.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-14-2010, 08:01 AM
 
Location: East Millcreek
2,530 posts, read 6,268,217 times
Reputation: 3000
Quote:
Originally Posted by destiny826 View Post
I'm looking at houses in Croton-on-Hudson and Yorktown Heights and saw some with septic,oil and well. Can people who have experience comment on the pros and cons. Is it worth buying a house with those systems? thank you.
If you're coming from somewhere else in the country where planned developments and higher housing density is the norm then these systems probably seem strange and exotic. However, you have described the vast majority of houses in all of Northern Westchester. Unless you're in a town center you're very unlikely to have municipal water, sewer or gas. So, nobody living up here thinks about the pros and cons, it's just a fact of life. Propane is available if you you don't like oil you don't have gas.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-14-2010, 10:20 AM
 
701 posts, read 3,141,207 times
Reputation: 183
It's not so much as pros and cons, as simply not having a choice. Many towns in Westchester, especially outside of the newer neighborhoods or outside of the town center, simply don't have sewer lines and water lines, meaning septic and wells are necessities. Same with gas lines, and oil heat.

Typically, the main con, is simply a bit of added expense as you need to hire contractors (to maintain your oil heater and replenish your oil, to clean out your septic tank every couple of years), and you need a good water filter. On a day in and day out basis, you shouldn't notice any difference.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-14-2010, 10:46 AM
 
123 posts, read 548,736 times
Reputation: 73
I'm sorry for asking silly questions, I have been living in the city all my life. If you have oil to heat your house do you have gas for cooking or you have to use an electric range? How much would monthly oil heat cost for an average 2500 sq ft house (I presume it's monthly to fill up)? Do I have to anything to maintain the well water or septic tank?
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-14-2010, 11:35 AM
 
Location: Yorktown Heights NY
1,316 posts, read 4,914,833 times
Reputation: 435
Quote:
Originally Posted by destiny826 View Post
I'm sorry for asking silly questions, I have been living in the city all my life. If you have oil to heat your house do you have gas for cooking or you have to use an electric range? How much would monthly oil heat cost for an average 2500 sq ft house (I presume it's monthly to fill up)? Do I have to anything to maintain the well water or septic tank?
It was all new to us when we moved up from the city too. Fortunately, it is all very easy to deal with. Well water is by far the best tasting water around. Croton and Yorktown Heights are in the watershed and the ground water is excellent. As for oil heat, it is much more comfortable than electric or gas heat.

To answer your questions:

Many houses will have propane for cooking, which works just like gas. We have a small tank that gets filled on a regular basis.

The oil tank is filled regularly (the company comes on a regular basis depending on the size of your tank and how quickly you run through the oil). Costs will vary depending on the going rate of oil and on your house--houses vary tremendously on how efficient they are. When you are interested in a particular house you should request the seller's expense records for the past year, including oil costs. Your service deal with the oil company should cover annual cleaning/maintenance of your boiler.

As Havoc said, you will need to get the septic system cleaned every 5 years or so. We did it recently and it was pretty cheap.

The water filter system should take care or itself.

Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-15-2010, 10:23 AM
 
123 posts, read 548,736 times
Reputation: 73
[LEFT]Thank you for reply, I have additional questions:

How are the water being pumped to the house? If the pump runs by electric, what happens when there is a power outage? What happens in floods or numerous rainy days?

How much water is in the well? How is it estimated and for how long of a period? When are the situations in which water would need to be delivered?

How is the maintenance of the well? Is the water safe and are all bad chemicals removed? Are there majority of restrictions in use in this area and/or surrounding areas?

Can there be more problems when the house has both well and septic (even if the both are placed (distance wise) according to code)?

Please share any experience that you may have.[/LEFT]
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-15-2010, 11:27 AM
 
Location: Yorktown Heights NY
1,316 posts, read 4,914,833 times
Reputation: 435
Destiny826,

The water pump is run by electricity. If there is a blackout you will only have water for a short period of time (whatever is already in the system) (same as in a high floor apartment). We've never had a blackout for more than a few hours, but we know people who have for longer periods and the lack of water was an issue. Some people get a small generator for these occasions.

Floods/rain is not an issue.

When you inspect the house the well will be tested both for the quality of the water and for the quantity. Our water is excellent and I believe that is generally true thoughout the area. The water is treated to remove any bad stuff, if needed. The well taps into the water table and naturally refills. Wells can run dry, but I've never heard of that happening in our area. If it does, you need to get a new one drilled. The testing that is done prior to purchase should be able to tell you if there is a potential problem.

No, having both septic and a well in't a problem. In most places it is the norm.

I'm not sure I undertand the question about restrictions. There are loads of restrictions in the watershed area, but that is to protect the reservoirs and the NYC water supply--which is affected by runoff into the streams--it isn't about private wells.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-15-2010, 11:45 AM
 
123 posts, read 548,736 times
Reputation: 73
"The water is treated to remove any bad stuff, if needed". Who does the treatment? Me or the County?

The question I meant is would there be a problem between the distance of the well and the septic tank, I won't want any contamination.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-15-2010, 12:36 PM
 
Location: East Millcreek
2,530 posts, read 6,268,217 times
Reputation: 3000
Quote:
Originally Posted by destiny826 View Post
"The water is treated to remove any bad stuff, if needed". Who does the treatment? Me or the County?

The question I meant is would there be a problem between the distance of the well and the septic tank, I won't want any contamination.
1. You do everything, including decide if treatment is needed. That is pretty much a personal decision (e.g., how much hardness you're willing to live with). You're not treating for anything biological. Neither the county nor the municipality does anything.
2. In an existing house the likelihood of well/septic separation is exceedingly low. Anyway, septic shouldn't be a problem unless the system has failed due to lack of regular pumping.
3. Don't worry so much about this stuff. The only generalization is that for 99.99% of everybody living up here it's no big deal. Everything depends on the specifics. A good home inspector will walk you through the particulars of any given property so you're not the 0.01%.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:



Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > New York > Westchester County
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:46 PM.

© 2005-2022, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top