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Old 11-08-2010, 06:29 AM
 
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OK, dumb question maybe, but that's what this board is for, right?

How different is winter in Northern Westchester (Croton, to be really specific) than in the city? I'm imagining tons more snow, colder, windier, pain in the neck to get around...you know...even more miserable than what we're used to.

(Geez, I make it sound like I'm asking about Antarctica! HA!)
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Old 11-08-2010, 06:53 AM
 
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Sounds about right. Although, it is all subjective. For example if you have a very short commute or you can work from home on snow days and you hire someone to shovel the snow in your property, it won't be so bad.
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Old 11-08-2010, 08:40 AM
 
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I strongly suggest having at least one automobile with AWD or 4WD. It's usually not all that different from the city except that you have to drive. A bit more snow but not that much more.
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Old 11-08-2010, 09:22 AM
 
Location: Yorktown Heights NY
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TDNY View Post
I strongly suggest having at least one automobile with AWD or 4WD. It's usually not all that different from the city except that you have to drive. A bit more snow but not that much more.
Totally agree. Winter is slightly colder in the Croton area than the city, but not much at all. However, that 3-5 degrees colder can make the difference between sleet and snow, so we definitely get more snow than the city or southern Westchester (which is sometimes a blessing since many areas to the south will get horrible icy conditions when we get fluffy white stuff).

Also agree on the car. You'll see lots of Subaru's, Volvos, and VW Passat's up here, because those are wagons that come with AWD.

All in all, winter up here is a great joy. The roads are very well maintained and driving is usually not a problem at all. Every year there's one or two times were snow hits at rush hour and I curse the heavens, but the rest of the time I adore it.
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Old 11-08-2010, 10:28 AM
 
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The "snow line" is 287. North of there you can get a lot more snow with each storm. That being said, there are only a few big storms each year and they do plow the road pretty quickly. But a 4WD is highly recommended. Even with a little snow I had trouble getting up hills in my Honday Accord. I just bought a Subaru Forrester.
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Old 11-09-2010, 06:11 AM
 
Location: East Millcreek
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Quote:
Originally Posted by curlygirl! View Post
I'm imagining tons more snow, colder, windier, pain in the neck to get around...you know...even more miserable than what we're used to.

(Geez, I make it sound like I'm asking about Antarctica! HA!)
Yes, actually it's much worse than that. Temperatures frequently remain below 0 for weeks at a time. Exposed skin freezes instantly on contact with the air resulting in frostbite. Most residents have lost fingers, toes, nose tips and cheek tissue to frostbite. Stockpiling food and fuel is very much the norm since leaving the house in Jan and Feb is life threatening.

Those that do venture out generally need crampons and ice tools. A compas and map are a good idea to manage disorientation during whiteouts. GPS's are useless because the low temperatures cause batteries to fail. An attachment pictures a party of daredevils enjoying a trip to the grocers during a rare winter thaw.

Automobile travel becomes a virtual impossibility for those without tracked vehicles. Cars require block heaters, like in Maine of Minnesota, but even those aren't enough in January when motor oil solidifies into wax.

Croton is especially problematical. The humidity of the Hudson combines with wind to create a thick layer of rime on all surfaces. The house pictured in the second attachment is quite typical. Such conditions persist for about 4 months, though rime can occur at any time between October and May.

In summary, yes, winter life in Northern Westchester is indeed only for a few tough and committed enthusiasts willing to commit the time and training to survive in such an environment. The rewards are the companionship of fellow nature lovers and a winter spectacle you'd otherwise have to travel to Nepal or the Andes to experience. Good luck!
Attached Thumbnails
Winter in N. Westchester-grocery-trip.jpg   Winter in N. Westchester-rime-criusted-house.jpg  
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Old 11-10-2010, 08:02 AM
 
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Originally Posted by kletter1mann View Post
Yes, actually it's much worse than that. Temperatures frequently remain below 0 for weeks at a time. Exposed skin freezes instantly on contact with the air resulting in frostbite. Most residents have lost fingers, toes, nose tips and cheek tissue to frostbite. Stockpiling food and fuel is very much the norm since leaving the house in Jan and Feb is life threatening.

Those that do venture out generally need crampons and ice tools. A compas and map are a good idea to manage disorientation during whiteouts. GPS's are useless because the low temperatures cause batteries to fail. An attachment pictures a party of daredevils enjoying a trip to the grocers during a rare winter thaw.

Automobile travel becomes a virtual impossibility for those without tracked vehicles. Cars require block heaters, like in Maine of Minnesota, but even those aren't enough in January when motor oil solidifies into wax.

Croton is especially problematical. The humidity of the Hudson combines with wind to create a thick layer of rime on all surfaces. The house pictured in the second attachment is quite typical. Such conditions persist for about 4 months, though rime can occur at any time between October and May.

In summary, yes, winter life in Northern Westchester is indeed only for a few tough and committed enthusiasts willing to commit the time and training to survive in such an environment. The rewards are the companionship of fellow nature lovers and a winter spectacle you'd otherwise have to travel to Nepal or the Andes to experience. Good luck!
Thank you SO much. It's so helpful to get advice from someone with real-life experience, otherwise I wouldn't know what to expect up there. I really appreciate your taking the time to lay it all out for me.

You've described it exactly as I imagined it. We figure we'll homeschool the kids so we don't have to leave the house every day, and we'll stock up on canned goods and fill the freezer until spring. Obviously, we'll have to get out at some point, so we did start looking for a husky and sled, but now I wonder if we should get two...
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Old 11-10-2010, 08:08 AM
 
Location: Harrison
826 posts, read 2,112,737 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kletter1mann View Post
Yes, actually it's much worse than that. Temperatures frequently remain below 0 for weeks at a time. Exposed skin freezes instantly on contact with the air resulting in frostbite. Most residents have lost fingers, toes, nose tips and cheek tissue to frostbite. Stockpiling food and fuel is very much the norm since leaving the house in Jan and Feb is life threatening.

Those that do venture out generally need crampons and ice tools. A compas and map are a good idea to manage disorientation during whiteouts. GPS's are useless because the low temperatures cause batteries to fail. An attachment pictures a party of daredevils enjoying a trip to the grocers during a rare winter thaw.

Automobile travel becomes a virtual impossibility for those without tracked vehicles. Cars require block heaters, like in Maine of Minnesota, but even those aren't enough in January when motor oil solidifies into wax.

Croton is especially problematical. The humidity of the Hudson combines with wind to create a thick layer of rime on all surfaces. The house pictured in the second attachment is quite typical. Such conditions persist for about 4 months, though rime can occur at any time between October and May.

In summary, yes, winter life in Northern Westchester is indeed only for a few tough and committed enthusiasts willing to commit the time and training to survive in such an environment. The rewards are the companionship of fellow nature lovers and a winter spectacle you'd otherwise have to travel to Nepal or the Andes to experience. Good luck!
Ha ha! This is actually how I describe winter at home in Toronto to people who have NO idea and just think that all of Canada is a frozen wasteland. And sometimes people believe me. Sheesh! Don't they know it's only like this in Buffalo???
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Old 11-10-2010, 11:19 AM
 
Location: Hudson Valley of New York
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The biggest problem with the snow and sleet is going up and down the hills. Northern Westcheser is very hilly unlike the city where it's mostly flat land give or take.
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Old 11-10-2010, 01:06 PM
 
Location: Auckland, NZ
715 posts, read 2,255,246 times
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Meteorology major here....

Typically much more snow North of I84 and less as you go further South.

Croton will see more snow than NYC, but not by too much...

NYC averages about 23 inches a year, Montgomery NY (on 84) averages about 42 inches a year, and Croton will be right in between those at around 30-35 inches a year.
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