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Old 05-04-2016, 07:08 AM
 
11 posts, read 10,675 times
Reputation: 10

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Quote:
Originally Posted by 987ABC View Post
Your points are well stated but I would argue that when people identify a school district as being excellent what they are really saying is that the schools are populated by students who are almost exclusively from families that they wish their kids to associated with - families that have both parents at home and the parents are highly educated, mature, financially secure, committed to their children time-wise and don't commit crimes, or abuse drugs or alcohol. This is what makes a school good. It's not necessarily true that the teachers are better or the facilities better.

Thus, while its correct to point out that high performing school districts owe their performance levels to the advantaged families that populate the district, it's rather irrelevant. People want their kids at high performing schools along side high performing families. I live in a district that is universally thought of as being good. Nearby is a district that is universally thought of as bad. If the governor somehow ordered that all the students from my district shall attend this nearby district and vice versa, than my district would overnight be the bad one, and the other one would be the good one. In short, it's the families that define the district more than anything else.
Well said 987.
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Old 05-04-2016, 07:24 AM
 
Location: White Plains, NY
34 posts, read 51,496 times
Reputation: 37
To 987ABC, I largely agree with you, but I'd push back at one part of what you're saying. Your point seems to assume that a particular district is "universally" thought of as "good" or "bad." It's not that simple. I live in White Plains, which I think is preferable to the districts on the Top10 list we're discussing. I know I'm not alone. Yet, many people who call Scarsdale / Chappaqua / Rye schools "great" also call White Plains schools "bad." That's also generally true of New Rochelle, and to varying degrees other districts like Dobbs Ferry. So, while I largely agree with you, I still think it's important for any individual person who's deciding where to move to determine what they think of as a "good district," and account for the ways it might be different from the ways Business Insider views it.
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Old 05-04-2016, 07:48 AM
 
351 posts, read 704,596 times
Reputation: 288
It's a personal choice. I know a handful of people who live in the districts from the list above, and are miserable there, but they stay because they think the schools are the best (and the only choice). They don't like the social scene, and they don't like the fact that they are 99% homogeneous. I live in a district that is not on the list, but I think the schools are great, and appreciate the fact that there is diversity. I think it prepares kids for the "real world" to be around people who are different for them.

Everyone needs to decide for themselves what makes a good school district. I personally couldn't bear to live in most of the places listed above.

(One note to MEK - Business Insider is not the source of the data - they are just republishing the data. It is actually from Niche.com (whatever that is) -- https://k12.niche.com/rankings/publi...ty-metro-area/ )
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Old 05-04-2016, 08:13 AM
 
78,515 posts, read 106,466,033 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hominamad View Post
It's a personal choice. I know a handful of people who live in the districts from the list above, and are miserable there, but they stay because they think the schools are the best (and the only choice). They don't like the social scene, and they don't like the fact that they are 99% homogeneous. I live in a district that is not on the list, but I think the schools are great, and appreciate the fact that there is diversity. I think it prepares kids for the "real world" to be around people who are different for them.

Everyone needs to decide for themselves what makes a good school district. I personally couldn't bear to live in most of the places listed above.

(One note to MEK - Business Insider is not the source of the data - they are just republishing the data. It is actually from Niche.com (whatever that is) -- https://k12.niche.com/rankings/publi...ty-metro-area/ )
Another thing people may overlook is that the districts that appear "perfect", for lack of a better term, can also "hide" their issues in terms of things such as drugs and alcohol. I'm saying this as a person that went to a school in a highly regarded school district in Upstate NY. So, there may be social aspects to consider and to be aware of regardless of the school district.
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Old 05-04-2016, 10:12 AM
 
926 posts, read 1,097,442 times
Reputation: 1518
Quote:
Originally Posted by MEK153 View Post
To 987ABC, I largely agree with you, but I'd push back at one part of what you're saying. Your point seems to assume that a particular district is "universally" thought of as "good" or "bad." It's not that simple. I live in White Plains, which I think is preferable to the districts on the Top10 list we're discussing. I know I'm not alone. Yet, many people who call Scarsdale / Chappaqua / Rye schools "great" also call White Plains schools "bad." That's also generally true of New Rochelle, and to varying degrees other districts like Dobbs Ferry. So, while I largely agree with you, I still think it's important for any individual person who's deciding where to move to determine what they think of as a "good district," and account for the ways it might be different from the ways Business Insider views it.
No push back needed. I wasn't referring to White Plains or New Rochelle. Those districts are far from being thought of as universally bad. Many people speak highly of them.

I think this discussion is colored by the fact that some posters are speaking about how a family should choose amongst various good districts, while others seem to be speaking as to what makes a district good or bad. As I stated earlier, I live in a district that is universally thought of as good. Quite literally everyone thinks it to be a good district. That is not the same thing as everyone wanting to live there. Instead, quite a few people may say "its a great district but its too small/white/catholic/whatever for me".

In other words, there is a list of good districts (the large majority of districts in the northern suburbs), than there is a much shorter list of what would be a good district for any particular family.
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Old 05-04-2016, 11:59 AM
 
Location: Østenfor sol og vestenfor måne
17,932 posts, read 22,415,025 times
Reputation: 38854
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Another thing people may overlook is that the districts that appear "perfect", for lack of a better term, can also "hide" their issues in terms of things such as drugs and alcohol. I'm saying this as a person that went to a school in a highly regarded school district in Upstate NY. So, there may be social aspects to consider and to be aware of regardless of the school district.
Good point. I graduated from likely the absolute worst school district in Westchester. Fights, low test scores, low graduation rate, etc. but surprisingly low drug and alcohol use.

Sure, a bit of pot and beer, but at the next school over, often lauded as one of the best in the county, let me just say the parties were ragers with the finest and widest selection of drugs money could buy (or parents stashes raided) and since these were wealthy families, the liquor selection at these parties was some serious top shelf goods.

Of course this was back in the 80s. Kids today may be more abstemious than in my day.
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Old 05-04-2016, 02:17 PM
 
2 posts, read 1,528 times
Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by 987ABC View Post
Your points are well stated but I would argue that when people identify a school district as being excellent what they are really saying is that the schools are populated by students who are almost exclusively from families that they wish their kids to associated with - families that have both parents at home and the parents are highly educated, mature, financially secure, committed to their children time-wise and don't commit crimes, or abuse drugs or alcohol. This is what makes a school good. It's not necessarily true that the teachers are better or the facilities better.

Thus, while its correct to point out that high performing school districts owe their performance levels to the advantaged families that populate the district, it's rather irrelevant. People want their kids at high performing schools along side high performing families. I live in a district that is universally thought of as being good. Nearby is a district that is universally thought of as bad. If the governor somehow ordered that all the students from my district shall attend this nearby district and vice versa, than my district would overnight be the bad one, and the other one would be the good one. In short, it's the families that define the district more than anything else.

Well said and I agree. After all, no one cares about kids' school ranking after they graduate. What matters is who they hang out with while they are there.
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Old 05-05-2016, 10:05 AM
 
12 posts, read 29,891 times
Reputation: 20
NY Bound,

I'm from the Chicago area and I lived in Westchester County for three years before moving back. We loved it there. Where in the Chicago area do you live? I can probably give you a reasonably accurate idea of towns that are similar.
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Old 05-06-2016, 07:22 AM
 
Location: Westchester, NY
71 posts, read 93,959 times
Reputation: 37
Try this website - it ranks all NYS school districts. Best School Districts in New York - NY District Rankings
Keep in mind a ranking of 100 is still a great district considering there are SO many successful districts in NYS.

This always puts things into perspective for my buyers. Good Luck!
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Old 05-06-2016, 12:12 PM
 
820 posts, read 936,554 times
Reputation: 519
Quote:
Originally Posted by NY Bound 78 View Post
We are going to be relocating to the NYC area over the summer, and I am completely overwhelmed by the information I have read about where to start looking for a home! We have 3 elementary school aged children, so schools are very important to me. We would like to be within a 45 minute commute to NYC. I like the idea of a very walkable town (easy to get to shops, cafes, etc), and safety is important to me.


We will be living on an income of $275,000 and hope to find a rental to live in before purchasing (hopefully staying in the same school district). Am I off to be looking at rentals $6000 and below? We are open to apartment/single family housing, although we are coming from suburban Chicago, and have never lived in a city environment. I love small-town living.


Any tips on where to narrow my search? I have been primarily looking in Westchester County. Should I look in other counties as well/instead? NJ?


Thanks in Advance for any tips
My first picks based on your profile would be Bronxville, Rye, and Larchmont. All 3 are on the water and have excellent walkable downtowns. Your budget won't go as far in the first two towns as in Larchmont, and there are more rentals there as well. There is also the Avalon in Bronxville worth checking out as it is right in town across the street from the train station. Schools in Larchmont are part of Mamaroneck so are not quite as highly ranked, but are still some of the best in the state.
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