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Old 08-27-2010, 03:34 PM
 
Location: Wisconsin
13 posts, read 25,320 times
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We have lived in several states and loved parts of each. We are now in SW Wisconsin and contemplating another move. I have read many of the posts on Sheboygan, but how do the winters compare with the rest of WI? Where we are currently in WI, the humidity and allergies are terrible in the summer and the winters are often below 0 for several weeks. Does the lake make the winters more mild temp wise in Sheboygan and does anyone with allergies feel they are less due to the lake? We are trying to decide whether to stay in WI or move back to the Denver, CO area or back to Oregon. Thanks!
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Old 09-07-2010, 03:24 PM
 
Location: Wisconsin
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Ok, so really broken down my question is does the lake affect the temp. in the Sheboygan area? I grew up with WI winters so I know how harsh or mild they can be, I was just hoping someone could answer weather the lake effect snow made the temps more mild (less below 0 days). We've asked several people and right now the opinion is split. And I tested the allergy question myself recently and not a whole lot of difference. Thanks for any input.
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Old 09-07-2010, 11:34 PM
 
Location: Lower East Side, Milwaukee, WI
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For the lake to have any noticeable effect you pretty much have to be within a few blocks of it. I live on Prospect Ave which overlooks Lake Michigan and I have noticed a slight difference in the severity of the weather we experience. For instance, last winter we had a really bad blizzard where the western suburbs and Madison got pounded by several feet of snow. Near the lake was another story, where I live on the East Side of Milwaukee didn't receive any snow at all, but we did receive some heavy rain. A variance of 5-10F can mean the difference between blizzard conditions or a decent soaking.

IMO the greatest benefit of living next to the lake in winter isn't the slightly warmer temps, but rather the increased sunshine. The winds off the lake blow back the cloud cover that normally hovers over the rest of the state in winter. My parents live in Appleton and during winter it stays gray and dreary up there for weeks at a time, but in my East Side neighborhood I usually see the sun for a few hours every single day in the winter.
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Old 09-08-2010, 01:46 AM
r_k
 
Location: Planet Earth
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There is a definite moderating effect of Lake Michigan on temps over the surrounding landmass. In winter the prevailing winds are from the W/NW so the effect is more pronounced on the eastern shores (Michigan) but even in Wisconsin you can expect a moderation as much as 50 to 100 miles inland, with the largest effect closest to the lake. Milwaukee and Madison are at nearly identical latitude, but the minimum daily average temps for mid-Jan are about 5 degs F colder in Madison than Milwaukee, and further west they are another degree or so colder but the effect tapers off. That is on average, and on particular days the difference in low temps may be as much as 10 or 20 degs. This is almost entirely due to the big lake. You can see this effect graphically on the USDA plant hardiness zone map for the northcentral states:

http://www.usna.usda.gov/Hardzone/hzm-nm1.html


The effect is reversed in the spring and summer, when the waters of the lake are cooler than the air, so coastal areas like Milwaukee and Sheboygan often have daytime high temps about 5 or 10 degs cooler than points 100 miles inland.
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Old 09-09-2010, 03:20 PM
 
Location: Wisconsin
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Thank you both for your replies. It cleared up the conflicting reports were were getting. Although I was hoping for a bit more of temp difference, the view of the lake would probably make up for that. Now I guess we just need to decide where the best fit is for us.
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Old 09-09-2010, 03:29 PM
 
Location: Northern Wisc
49 posts, read 78,177 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WICOPNW View Post
We have lived in several states and loved parts of each. We are now in SW Wisconsin and contemplating another move. I have read many of the posts on Sheboygan, but how do the winters compare with the rest of WI? Where we are currently in WI, the humidity and allergies are terrible in the summer and the winters are often below 0 for several weeks. Does the lake make the winters more mild temp wise in Sheboygan and does anyone with allergies feel they are less due to the lake? We are trying to decide whether to stay in WI or move back to the Denver, CO area or back to Oregon. Thanks!
When I was looking to move to the Denver area a few years back, my friend who lives there seemed to get more snow than I did in Northern Wisc. To me winters are harsh up here; and they seem to last forever! I used to live near Sheboygan and didn't seem to mind the winters as much as I do now. Ugh!

I am looking to re-locate to either OR or WA. Where in OR did you live?
Good luck to you! Let us now what you decide...
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Old 09-09-2010, 05:55 PM
r_k
 
Location: Planet Earth
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Yes, Northern WI (or Southern, for that matter) is quite a bit colder than Denver. Taking the example of Rhinelander, the average high/low for Jan are 21/0 (degs F) compared with 43/15 for Denver.
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Old 09-10-2010, 09:50 PM
 
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Winters are colder and dryer in WI but spring comes earlier. I flew through DEN last mid April and the trees were bare, when my connecting flight got me to GRB the trees were budding out and flowering shrubs were in bloom.
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Old 09-10-2010, 10:44 PM
 
Location: Lower East Side, Milwaukee, WI
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bay2bay View Post
Winters are colder and dryer in WI but spring comes earlier. I flew through DEN last mid April and the trees were bare, when my connecting flight got me to GRB the trees were budding out and flowering shrubs were in bloom.
This is true. In fact, Denver can get freak blizzards as late as May and June. Snow is usually over with by late March/early April here in Milwaukee.
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Old 09-10-2010, 11:35 PM
 
119 posts, read 428,486 times
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I've lived in both SW Wisconsin and Denver. Wisconsin actually gets the full four seasons whereas Denver will get random strings of spring in the middle of winter but then summer pretty much picks up before you know it.

Trees in Denver don't bloom until much later because the nighttime temps dip too low in the months of March-May. Also the reason our flowers in Denver don't bloom until later.

No way that Denver gets more snow than any part of Wisconsin. We are still at under 10" of precipitation for this entire year.

I didn't know I had allergies until moving to a drier climate.

I think the weather is pretty much a wash for me with the two places. I dislike Colorado summers as much as I dislike Wisconsin winters. I can escape the cold in front of a fireplace or under a blanket but escaping the heat out here means crawling in front of an air conditioner, which makes the air even drier. I really do miss the Wisconsin springs and the colors in the fall but I know I would miss the mild winters in Colorado. Tough decision for you basing it just on climate.
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