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Old 06-26-2013, 03:53 PM
 
9,856 posts, read 14,086,584 times
Reputation: 5460

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ForkInTheRoad View Post
I don't have a field. I'm a fresh college graduate that studied theater. I thought we were talking about skills? Ask about specific skills you think will translate to employment.
What do you want to do?

Right now we have a dramatic IT shortage. Specifically, data analyst skills are sorely needed. If you became proficient in SQL and could do data work with technologies such as Cognos, QlikView, etc. you could have a job in no time. A decent (free) place to start is W3Schools Online Web Tutorials, they have some pretty good beginner tutorials. Additionally, financial skills will lead to solid employment. If you were proficient in valuation techniques by translating 10k statements, as an example, you could quickly find a job.
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Old 06-26-2013, 03:58 PM
 
503 posts, read 1,087,407 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fishbrains View Post
Skills are vague and are usually not fully developed by academic training.

Let's use time management as an example. In an academic setting you work to a deadline at the end of the semester. In a work setting you may have several different projects due at different times. Academically you have the freedom to do your work at almost any time of day or night and attendance policies may be lax. The work environment demands that your work is done between 9-5 and attendance and punctuality are critical.

I could go on, but I think that my example demonstrates that experience in school develops skills that are only loosely analogous to a work setting.
I had daily deadlines on work and a full 8AM-11PM schedule. Usually only had weekends to play catch-up on work and 2 breaks for meals. My final year I cut a few electives to work as an assistant manager at a retail store on my off time. I also wrote an academic research thesis that was presented to the department board. Attendance was not lax. If you skipped 3 times, many professors flunked you or had you taken off their roster. Late? Doors were locked. You were not welcome of you ran late. Get a C in an elective? Your advisor was reprimanding you. Outside of class, I was running around campus to meetings and advising committees in an organization. I was very known on campus for my time management, and somehow making time for even more responsibilities. My psych professor didn't believe I was taking 14 classes at once. Printed out my transcript for him. He acted like I was an alien, lol.

And people think I partied and slacked for 4 years? Wow.
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Old 06-26-2013, 04:06 PM
 
503 posts, read 1,087,407 times
Reputation: 410
Quote:
Originally Posted by hnsq View Post
What do you want to do?

Right now we have a dramatic IT shortage. Specifically, data analyst skills are sorely needed. If you became proficient in SQL and could do data work with technologies such as Cognos, QlikView, etc. you could have a job in no time. A decent (free) place to start is W3Schools Online Web Tutorials, they have some pretty good beginner tutorials. Additionally, financial skills will lead to solid employment. If you were proficient in valuation techniques by translating 10k statements, as an example, you could quickly find a job.
I'm hoping to switch into a career with animals. But in the meantime, work is work. I can pretend I live to answer phones.

As far as day work goes, I know SQL, XML, HTML, CSS, VBA, some limited C++, LUA, I can do easy things like network setup/troubleshooting/monitoring, I'm familiar with UNIX and I apparently "do things with spreadsheets you can't imagine" according to my old boss, lol. Those aren't employable without a degree in the field though.

I learned everything from personal curiosity, not formally in a class.
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Old 06-26-2013, 04:09 PM
 
2,538 posts, read 4,271,838 times
Reputation: 3344
Quote:
Originally Posted by ForkInTheRoad View Post
I had daily deadlines on work and a full 8AM-11PM schedule. Usually only had weekends to play catch-up on work and 2 breaks for meals. My final year I cut a few electives to work as an assistant manager at a retail store on my off time. I also wrote an academic research thesis that was presented to the department board. Attendance was not lax. If you skipped 3 times, many professors flunked you or had you taken off their roster. Late? Doors were locked. You were not welcome of you ran late. Get a C in an elective? Your advisor was reprimanding you. Outside of class, I was running around campus to meetings and advising committees in an organization. I was very known on campus for my time management, and somehow making time for even more responsibilities. My psych professor didn't believe I was taking 14 classes at once. Printed out my transcript for him. He acted like I was an alien, lol.

And people think I partied and slacked for 4 years? Wow.
Hmm, based on your previous posts I would have assumed you were a complete slacker and all around leech. If you did make an effort, what happened? I know some people simply burn out and give up, completely simplifying their lives to the point of living like paupers. While on paper it might be nice, you are either a burden now or you likely will be in the future. Find some direction before it is too late.
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Old 06-26-2013, 04:15 PM
 
9,856 posts, read 14,086,584 times
Reputation: 5460
Quote:
Originally Posted by ForkInTheRoad View Post
I'm hoping to switch into a career with animals. But in the meantime, work is work. I can pretend I live to answer phones.

As far as day work goes, I know SQL, XML, HTML, CSS, VBA, some limited C++, LUA, I can do easy things like network setup/troubleshooting/monitoring, I'm familiar with UNIX and I apparently "do things with spreadsheets you can't imagine" according to my old boss, lol. Those aren't employable without a degree in the field though.

I learned everything from personal curiosity, not formally in a class.
Have you volunteered to do projects for local companies so that you can prove you achieved actual results with the work you have done? You cannot just say you have a skill, you have to show a company how you have earned or saved money or time for someone else because of the skills you have. How are you applying those skills, and how are you proving your results to others on a resume?
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Old 06-26-2013, 04:26 PM
 
Location: Living on the Coast in Oxnard CA
16,276 posts, read 28,827,588 times
Reputation: 21722
Quote:
Originally Posted by ForkInTheRoad View Post
Poor: $0 to $4,500
I generally have had this income. Juggling bills, borrowing, working off jobs to pay what I can't get put on hold... It's manageable. I've learned to budget well this way. If I didn't have couches to sleep on I'd be very screwed in this situation.

Livable: $4,500 to $10,000
Juggling bills and calling debtors but this is usually easier to manage. I can do things like eat two square meals a day on income like this. Might not be healthy or perfect, but I can enjoy the small things in life.

Fair: $10,000 to $20,000
I can start paying more than the minimum on bills and manage to go out to eat or hang out with friends and start saving for my own apartment.

Good: $20,000 to $30,000
I'd have no issues paying for an apartment and paying bills while leading a "normal life." This inclme would be where I invest in a 401k, health insurance, etc. A job like this I would classify as a career success.

Great: $30,000 to $50,000
I wouldn't regret college if I got this. I'd invest for my future and help fund my family's needs.

Amazing: $50,000 to $99,999
Maybe I could buy a house, or a car.

Unimaginable: $100,000+
I'd pay off all my debt, get myself situated, then dump the rest into everybody who helped me get there.
And i was thinking that $10,000 to $20,000 a month was a good salary. Would love to hit the $100,000 a month or more range.
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Old 06-26-2013, 04:29 PM
 
Location: Living on the Coast in Oxnard CA
16,276 posts, read 28,827,588 times
Reputation: 21722
Quote:
Originally Posted by EVAunit1981 View Post
I make around 22K per year. I live in a small town, so the cost of living is cheaper, but still it sucks.

Oh and I have a four year degree.

College is a rip off.
Degree in what discipline?
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Old 06-26-2013, 04:31 PM
 
2,538 posts, read 4,271,838 times
Reputation: 3344
Quote:
Originally Posted by SOON2BNSURPRISE View Post
And i was thinking that $10,000 to $20,000 a month was a good salary. Would love to hit the $100,000 a month or more range.
Unfortunately ForkInTheRoad is apparently stuck in 1969, and those numbers are per year.
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Old 06-26-2013, 04:34 PM
 
6,791 posts, read 7,497,153 times
Reputation: 6973
Quote:
Originally Posted by SOON2BNSURPRISE View Post
And i was thinking that $10,000 to $20,000 a month was a good salary. Would love to hit the $100,000 a month or more range.
Only 6% of Americans earn 100K in a year. 75% earn less than 50K/yr. 10-20K a month is more than good.

I would adjust Fork's numbers up by 10K or so, then it's pretty realistic according to what most people in most fields actually earn. If his numbers are what new grads are experiencing our country is F'ed, they will have little to put into the economy, and most of us will fall as the very wealthy sock all their millions away. Student loans are already taking a huge chunk of many incomes, that's money that goes to banks instead of supporting the day to day economy.

Last edited by detshen; 06-26-2013 at 04:43 PM..
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Old 06-26-2013, 04:34 PM
 
503 posts, read 1,087,407 times
Reputation: 410
Quote:
Originally Posted by Velvet Jones View Post
Unfortunately ForkInTheRoad is apparently stuck in 1969, and those numbers are per year.
No, I just don't have everything that everybody else has, like jobs that have measurable achievements. I've only worked drone jobs for small businesses like backyard retailers or graveyard jobs. lol
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