U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Work and Employment
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 06-15-2013, 05:07 PM
 
7,237 posts, read 11,552,640 times
Reputation: 5595

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Guidance100 View Post
What do you consider a good/bad Personal income and a good/bad Household Income?
Please also state your Metropolitan area.

PERSONAL INCOMES
Very Low Salary: Under 25k (most service and unskilled jobs)
Low Salary: $25k-35k (most entry level college grad jobs & experienced unskilled jobs)
Decent Salary: $35k-49k (most non-mgmt office workers and most skilled trade workers)
Good Salary: $50K-79K (most middle management jobs)
Great Salary: 80k-99k (most higher management and professional jobs)
Amazing Salary: 100k and higher (most directors/executives, doctorates and successful entrepreneurs)

HOUSEHOLD INCOMES (not including childless ppl who live alone)
Very Low HHI: Under $50k (poor households)
Low HHI: $50k-74k (working class households)
Decent HHI: $75k-89k (lower middle class households)
Good HHI: $90k-129k (solidly middle class households)
Great HHI: $130k-199k (upper middle class households)
Amazing HHI: 200k and higher (wealthy households)

Metropolitan Area: NYC area/suburbs (yeah, I know in many parts of the country, things are completely different, lol)
I more or less agree with your numbers for Detroit.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-16-2013, 09:15 AM
 
199 posts, read 1,021,836 times
Reputation: 269
Quote:
Originally Posted by 313Weather View Post
I more or less agree with your numbers for Detroit.
wow, really?

I thought Detroit had a very low cost of living?

I can't imagine a household income of $70,000 being below the middle class threshold in Detroit
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-16-2013, 09:26 AM
 
7,237 posts, read 11,552,640 times
Reputation: 5595
Quote:
Originally Posted by Guidance100 View Post
wow, really?

I thought Detroit had a very low cost of living?

I can't imagine a household income of $70,000 being below the middle class threshold in Detroit
Detroit Metropolitan Area

An income below $70,000 isn't being below middle class, but you're certainly not living like The Jeffersons either.

On average, an veteran autoworker in Detroit makes about $60K per year. They're able to afford a nice 3 bedroom home in the suburbs, a cottage up north and the occasional trip of out of town, but they're not necessarily "livin' it up." So it's a "good salary."
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-16-2013, 09:30 AM
 
305 posts, read 569,546 times
Reputation: 419
I can tell you that minimum wage is a less than low salary and working full time making minimum wage isn't enough to afford a 2 bedroom apartment in any state.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-19-2013, 01:22 AM
 
59 posts, read 164,796 times
Reputation: 131
If you are a student or someone who makes 30k then I could see how a 100k salary seems like an "amazing" salary. But it is not. Most likely you are making a certain assumption that one would continue to live in the same living standards as when making a $30k salary but that's clearly not true.

At $30k you probably rent a really small apartment or split rent with a roommate for $500 a month or something. When you get a $100k job you don't continue to live at that living standard and put the rest in your pocket. No one does that. You spend more. Other things happen too when you start to make more money: cars, houses, children, etc.

I graduated and got my job 9.5 years ago and started at a base $67k salary. According to my last tax filing, I grossed $144k. I work a salaried job, and the amount of work can vary, I've had an entire year that was very ho-hum where I worked 38-40 hours per week consistently, and I have had periods where I work 55 hours a week for months on end.

But it's not like I drive a Ferrari or take exotic vacations to Europe or something. Maybe if I still lived in a $500 apartment and took public transit and was single with no kids I would have these things, but that's not normally what people do. I consider myself middle class, not upper middle class. I live in Seattle.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-19-2013, 01:47 AM
 
503 posts, read 1,085,884 times
Reputation: 410
Quote:
Originally Posted by Akama13 View Post
I can tell you that minimum wage is a less than low salary and working full time making minimum wage isn't enough to afford a 2 bedroom apartment in any state.
$1,160 a month before taxes with Federal Minimum working full-time. Even after taxes, that's plenty for me.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-19-2013, 04:24 AM
 
249 posts, read 380,635 times
Reputation: 448
My info comes from another country, so feel free to skip if your only interest is the USA, but this is for Japan, where the saying that everyone is middle class is very, very true. In the professional world, even top management usually don't make more than triple what the young recruits earn. And the tax system is set up so that wives don't have to pay into national health insurance/retirement if they earn under about $14,000 (their husbands' payments cover them), so in most households the husband is the only breadwinner.

It makes for a very egalitarian society where there are few super-rich but also few impoverished:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Guidance100 View Post
PERSONAL INCOMES
Very Low Salary: Under 30k (most non-professional employees)
Low Salary: $30k-35k (most entry level college grad jobs & experienced unskilled jobs)
Decent Salary: $35k-40k (10-year veteran unskilled or 5-year veteran skilled/college grad)
Good Salary: $40-59K (college grads in their 30s-40s)
Great Salary: $60-79k (professionals aged 40s-50s, middle management)
Amazing Salary: 80k and higher (top-level management with 30+ years of experience)

HOUSEHOLD INCOMES (not including childless ppl who live alone)
Very Low HHI: Under $30k (poor households)
Low HHI: $30-40k (working class households)
Decent HHI: $40-45k (lower middle class households)
Good HHI: $45-65k (solidly middle class households)
Great HHI: $65-90k (upper middle class households)
Amazing HHI: 90k and higher (wealthy households)

Metropolitan Area: Major Japanese cities such as Tokyo, Osaka, Kyoto, Kobe
What can vary a lot, though, is working hours. All college-grad recruits get paid about $30-35k per year, but some work strict 9-to-5 hours whereas others are at work 12-14 hours a day or more! All that unpaid overtime, which Japan's top companies are infamous for, is so soul-crushing that many young people drop out of the work force for jobs that are less prestigious.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-19-2013, 04:35 AM
 
Location: Phoenix,az
391 posts, read 749,129 times
Reputation: 322
Quote:
Originally Posted by Guidance100 View Post
What do you consider a good/bad Personal income and a good/bad Household Income?
Please also state your Metropolitan area.

PERSONAL INCOMES
Very Low Salary: Under 25k (most service and unskilled jobs)
Low Salary: $25k-35k (most entry level college grad jobs & experienced unskilled jobs)
Decent Salary: $35k-49k (most non-mgmt office workers and most skilled trade workers)
Good Salary: $50K-79K (most middle management jobs)
Great Salary: 80k-99k (most higher management and professional jobs)
Amazing Salary: 100k and higher (most directors/executives, doctorates and successful entrepreneurs)

HOUSEHOLD INCOMES (not including childless ppl who live alone)
Very Low HHI: Under $50k (poor households)
Low HHI: $50k-74k (working class households)
Decent HHI: $75k-89k (lower middle class households)
Good HHI: $90k-129k (solidly middle class households)
Great HHI: $130k-199k (upper middle class households)
Amazing HHI: 200k and higher (wealthy households)

Metropolitan Area: NYC area/suburbs (yeah, I know in many parts of the country, things are completely different, lol)
This is Phoenix,AZ. 75K after taxes would be amazing.. lol
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-19-2013, 08:34 PM
 
6,791 posts, read 7,486,954 times
Reputation: 6973
Quote:
Originally Posted by jobaba View Post
This is the real world.

Personal income in the United States - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

And the reality is that if you make six figures that you have a very good salary. Anywhere. NYC. San Fransisco. Wherever.

Those that are making 100K. That's great. You probably worked hard to get there.

But those that are making 100K and complaining it's still not enough to live, you're part of the problem. Somewhere out there, in your city, there's somebody busting their a@@ for 30K a year and supporting children.


I agree with this, realistically getting to 100K may mean 3-4 promotions, most will never attain that income per capita, and many of the incomes that people label as entry level/recent grad are the top salaries for A LOT of people. I worked HR for a few years in SoCal where the cost of living is high, I knew everyone's salary, most were between 35-50K, many of these people were over 40, only a few made over 75K. This was a college educated, white collar, professional workplace. I also did the payroll for our SF office, that's one of the most expensive areas in the country, they were more in the 40-60K range, still not what some of these numbers would lead one to reasonably expect to earn. This was 10 years ago, but I doubt it has increased very much.

Only 5.29% of people make between 75-100K. 75% of people earn less than 50K

Last edited by detshen; 06-19-2013 at 08:49 PM..
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-19-2013, 11:11 PM
 
Location: Metro Detroit, Michigan
18,083 posts, read 16,538,389 times
Reputation: 18013
Quote:
Originally Posted by Guidance100 View Post
wow, really?

I thought Detroit had a very low cost of living?

I can't imagine a household income of $70,000 being below the middle class threshold in Detroit
Living in the city itself can be a little pricy if you want to live in the few good or even decent parts. Not even close to being as expensive as most major cities though. They have the highest corporate taxes in the nation, so jobs are few and far between. Property can be bought on the cheap, although you couldn't pay me enough to live there. Many Detroiters do their shopping in the suburbs where it's cheaper and you have a greater selection of what you're after. You could do just fine on 40K in Detroit, and own property without a problem. I know people who do quite well out there with less.

If you ask me, 40K for a single income earner in Detroit would be middle class, and probably closer to 35K. A middle class family income would probably start at around 55K, approaching 60K. When I lived in the Metro Detroit area a couple years back, the house I rented cost $750/month, gas was around $3.40 a gallon, and other essentials were remarkably more affordable than where I live now. I almost bought a nice 1 story, 3 br house in the suburbs for 30K, but a bank came along and scooped it up for about 40K. I still buy things like cheese in bulk when I travel back because it's 50% cheaper than the Chicagoland area. The metro Detroit area would be a great place to live if it weren't for the instability in the job market. It's much better now but every decade, there is an exodus of workers who leave because the state bleeds jobs and opportunity. I still have friends who have graduated and can't find anything paying over $10/hr, and some can't find a job period.

Just an aside, but I don't think a cottage up north is a indicative measure of middle class. That's more of an upper middle class luxury. A veteran autoworker represented by the UAW tops out at 58K without overtime unless they are in one of the skilled trades.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Work and Employment
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2021, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top