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Old 01-02-2014, 08:18 AM
 
8 posts, read 8,409 times
Reputation: 25

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I've been reading different threads on this subject and I often hear if you have a micromanager then

Over update them, bend over backwards to meet their needs, find another job etc etc..

Well In my experience I found that to be feeding into their behavior more.

Recently I had a micromanager that would nitpick every little thing and always had some criticism or the other. I finally got fed up and said in a one on one meeting:

"Look I think its great that you are paying attention to details and trying to make everything better, I have a lot of experience in this field and can contribute a lot of my own Ideas. Can we try implementing things the way I have written them and see how it goes. If anybody has a concern we can have a follow up discussion and change things as needed."

She looked at me and said she would give my idea a chance and from there I experienced less micromanagement. I felt like my sanity was preserved and I got what I needed off my chest.

Now this is a corporation where there are multiple levels of management and she is a new middle manager. It would obviously be different if she was the owner of a company.

It often is best to push back a bit at work and be a bit assertive.

Anyone else have experiences of confronting a micromanager or boss and establishing boundaries?
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Old 01-02-2014, 09:24 AM
 
Location: Annandale, VA
5,094 posts, read 4,621,448 times
Reputation: 4217
Quote:
Originally Posted by pros30 View Post
I've been reading different threads on this subject and I often hear if you have a micromanager then

Over update them, bend over backwards to meet their needs, find another job etc etc..

Well In my experience I found that to be feeding into their behavior more.

Recently I had a micromanager that would nitpick every little thing and always had some criticism or the other. I finally got fed up and said in a one on one meeting:

"Look I think its great that you are paying attention to details and trying to make everything better, I have a lot of experience in this field and can contribute a lot of my own Ideas. Can we try implementing things the way I have written them and see how it goes. If anybody has a concern we can have a follow up discussion and change things as needed."

She looked at me and said she would give my idea a chance and from there I experienced less micromanagement. I felt like my sanity was preserved and I got what I needed off my chest.

Now this is a corporation where there are multiple levels of management and she is a new middle manager. It would obviously be different if she was the owner of a company.

It often is best to push back a bit at work and be a bit assertive.

Anyone else have experiences of confronting a micromanager or boss and establishing boundaries?

This usually happens when someone is promoted from within. They can't let go of the day-to-day details and have not developed the skills to just manage the workflow.


They still want the comfort of doing their old job because they have not yet grown into their new one.
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Old 01-02-2014, 10:07 AM
 
16,380 posts, read 19,669,838 times
Reputation: 14298
I did something different. I resigned. Got a better gig with a great manager that doesn't micromanage, yet still leads effectively and gets excellent results.
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Old 01-02-2014, 05:23 PM
 
Location: Connecticut
206 posts, read 367,993 times
Reputation: 306
It totally depends on the situation. It sounds like you handled this micromanager exactly right. You were polite about reminding her that you know what you're doing, but you also acknowledged that she's in charge. Congratulations.
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Old 01-02-2014, 05:33 PM
 
323 posts, read 323,703 times
Reputation: 423
Quote:
Originally Posted by sware2cod View Post
I did something different. I resigned. Got a better gig with a great manager that doesn't micromanage, yet still leads effectively and gets excellent results.
This is what I would do if I could actually get some interest in my resume. Seems like once a micromanager, always a micromanager.
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Old 01-02-2014, 05:36 PM
 
5,640 posts, read 6,494,953 times
Reputation: 7540
Quote:
Originally Posted by pros30 View Post
I've been reading different threads on this subject and I often hear if you have a micromanager then

Over update them, bend over backwards to meet their needs, find another job etc etc..

Well In my experience I found that to be feeding into their behavior more.

Recently I had a micromanager that would nitpick every little thing and always had some criticism or the other. I finally got fed up and said in a one on one meeting:

"Look I think its great that you are paying attention to details and trying to make everything better, I have a lot of experience in this field and can contribute a lot of my own Ideas. Can we try implementing things the way I have written them and see how it goes. If anybody has a concern we can have a follow up discussion and change things as needed."

She looked at me and said she would give my idea a chance and from there I experienced less micromanagement. I felt like my sanity was preserved and I got what I needed off my chest.

Now this is a corporation where there are multiple levels of management and she is a new middle manager. It would obviously be different if she was the owner of a company.

It often is best to push back a bit at work and be a bit assertive.

Anyone else have experiences of confronting a micromanager or boss and establishing boundaries?
There is nothing wrong with finding a new job. Last time, I got a $20k raise.
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Old 01-02-2014, 05:47 PM
MJ7
 
6,221 posts, read 9,372,165 times
Reputation: 6530
This was the professional thing to do, great job!
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