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Old 10-16-2014, 11:34 AM
 
62 posts, read 115,567 times
Reputation: 120

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I have 15 days of vacation a year, and even taking a week off is a nightmare of scheduling conflicts and begging coworkers to cover for me to the point that I'm dissuaded from doing more than occasionally taking a Friday off to make it a three day weekend. I went from school to college to grad school to full-time 50 hours a week employment without any break, and now I'm pushing 30 and very much feel the itch of an unlived life.

I see stories occasionally how people dropping everything and making a motorcycle trip to Alaska or whatever. That sounds awesome, but I feel like people rarely talk about the practical considerations. How much did you save up in advance? How long were you gone? How long did it take you to get back to where you were in your career when you returned? How did you explain your resume gap to employers?
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Old 10-20-2014, 05:28 PM
 
46 posts, read 54,027 times
Reputation: 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nolegator View Post
I have 15 days of vacation a year, and even taking a week off is a nightmare of scheduling conflicts and begging coworkers to cover for me to the point that I'm dissuaded from doing more than occasionally taking a Friday off to make it a three day weekend. I went from school to college to grad school to full-time 50 hours a week employment without any break, and now I'm pushing 30 and very much feel the itch of an unlived life.

I see stories occasionally how people dropping everything and making a motorcycle trip to Alaska or whatever. That sounds awesome, but I feel like people rarely talk about the practical considerations. How much did you save up in advance? How long were you gone? How long did it take you to get back to where you were in your career when you returned? How did you explain your resume gap to employers?
I too would like to know
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Old 10-20-2014, 05:34 PM
 
13,395 posts, read 12,089,265 times
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The answer to all of those questions depend on personal circumstance. You need to look at some blogs of people who travel most of the year. Contact them and ask the questions.
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Old 10-20-2014, 06:18 PM
MJ7
 
6,221 posts, read 10,116,838 times
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I've never done so, but I know many teachers and professors that did. According to them it is well worth it, last one I met was on the Appalachian Trail. At first the guy probably hated me because I told him to get out of the watering hole (he was bathing naked in it, it was meant for drinking). I walked about 8 miles with the guy and just chatted, he was happy that I had cell phone reception at the time, so I let him use my phone. Older guy that was an empty nester, seemed very happy about his adventure, life changing in his words.
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Old 10-20-2014, 07:16 PM
 
Location: North Carolina
282 posts, read 419,556 times
Reputation: 470
I did it. Was burned out from a high-pressure job I'd been in for 10 years, so I quit and drove across country. Found a new job along the way, where I've been for the past 15 years. I wasn't looking for one--it found me. And I've loved it most of the time!
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Old 10-20-2014, 08:09 PM
 
46 posts, read 54,027 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by trying harder View Post
I did it. Was burned out from a high-pressure job I'd been in for 10 years, so I quit and drove across country. Found a new job along the way, where I've been for the past 15 years. I wasn't looking for one--it found me. And I've loved it most of the time!


can you elaborate on your journey a little more? seems too good to be true hah
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Old 10-21-2014, 01:02 AM
 
35 posts, read 49,233 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by trying harder View Post
I did it. Was burned out from a high-pressure job I'd been in for 10 years, so I quit and drove across country. Found a new job along the way, where I've been for the past 15 years. I wasn't looking for one--it found me. And I've loved it most of the time!

what was the old high-pressure job and what's your current job that found you?
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Old 10-21-2014, 07:43 AM
 
694 posts, read 1,131,049 times
Reputation: 830
I know someone who quit a high-pressure job at a well-know company with an intent to stay home and use the time to trade on the market, after about 9 months, the person went back to the same job, but don't be dissuaded by this example-the person had a family to support and the money that we was planning to trade with was his kids college fund. I say, if you are single, have no other people to support but yourself and have a year of savings in a bank, go for it, and in terms of getting back to the working world, I would honestly say exactly what you said in your post-you have been working your arse off and wanted a change of pace for a while, now that you had it, you are ready to go back in the saddle, or who knows, you might discover some talent along your journey and decide to make a career out of it, sounds like you are in need of a change.
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Old 10-22-2014, 08:16 AM
 
587 posts, read 862,710 times
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I've done this a couple of times. It's great. It can be a tough thing to do if you have always been responsible, employed, and future time oriented, but once you do it the first time, it's a lot easier to do it again.

I was in a job that paid pretty well. I saved up about 3 years worth of living expenses and spent two months in a foreign country. A year later, I got a job that I kept for a little under a year and quit my job again for another extended trip. I had some stock market gambling pay off big time and I've been able to avoid working for several years now (but am close to needing a job or income at this point).

I work in a field that has a shortage of qualified job candidates in my area, so I am okay having a resume with gaps. Having an interesting story can help you land a job, in my experience.

I have no kids, but I do have a mortgage.
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Old 10-22-2014, 10:26 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
32,172 posts, read 26,576,785 times
Reputation: 42202
What you're describing is a long vacation, and not a quitting your job type sabbatical. If you can't take more than a week off with sufficient notice (probably at least a month - maybe two depending on job), other people need to be better trained/more efficient with your tasks, or the company needs to hire additional personnel.

If you want to take six months off, that's something to discuss with the employer (although given what you said, it sounds like it would be prohibited). I've only known one person to admit quitting his regular job and going traveling, and he had a hell of a time finding work, and this was recently. I would be very careful.
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