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Old 11-17-2014, 04:31 PM
 
Location: Living on the Coast in Oxnard CA
16,290 posts, read 29,560,745 times
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I would say it depends on if you are building a customer base. Are these clients that will purchase from you in the future? I know that when you are building an insurance or financial planning customer base you could end up putting in 100 hours a week for 3 or maybe 5 years. After that it may be smooth sailing.
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Old 11-17-2014, 05:04 PM
 
122 posts, read 190,624 times
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At my last company, any hourly employees that regularly pulled overtime eventually became salaried to reduce labor costs. Unsurprisingly, every salaried employee at the company worked more than 40 hours a week, and sometimes weekends.

40+ weeks for salaried workers seems to be the new normal. I read an interesting quote once that observed how the situation of salaried workers today share many parallels with that of hourly workers in the Guilded Age (i.e., widespread exploitation of factory workers eventually leading to the rise of labor unions.)
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Old 11-17-2014, 05:18 PM
 
10,585 posts, read 5,938,566 times
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The company may classify an employee as exempt, but that doesn't mean they are legitimately in that category. It's unclear whether the OP does inside sales (usually non-exempt) or outside sales (exempt) because he has cited both mileage policies and office policies. I also question whether his 11-12 hour days include commuting time which is irrelevant. Here's a pretty concise definition of determining whether the classification is correct:
Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) Coverage (Exempt vs. Non-Exempt -- The Online Wages, Hours and Overtime Pay Resource
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Old 11-17-2014, 05:37 PM
 
13,432 posts, read 11,381,977 times
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That's the problem with salary jobs. Bosses feel free to force employees to work beyond 40 hours a week. There are pluses and minuses to being salary. With being salary, you pretty much know what your paycheck is going to be. Those extended hours without complaints (verbal and non-verbal) earn brownie points. Though they may not say so, those who count do notice. They're also a good time to build up your own personal networking system of customers, potential customers, and potential future employers. The advantage of hourly wages is you're paid for the hours you work. Because of this, your boss is less likely to make you work over 40 hours a week unless it's an emergency and when you do work over 40 hours a week, you get paid time and a half.
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Old 11-17-2014, 07:10 PM
 
617 posts, read 625,593 times
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You could be stuck in the opposite. No hours and no money. 29 hours is what Obama created. The limit before full time benefits happen. So there are a lot of 29ers. Or no job. I was a truck driver and worked 70 or more a week.
It seems employers want more from people. My sister was told to do three people's jobs at the same time. If she wouldn't they told her to quit. The economy is tough.
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Old 11-17-2014, 09:18 PM
 
270 posts, read 234,957 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by peter_midnight View Post
It is an outside sales position with no commission

Is this normal for entry level outside sales?
Quote:
Originally Posted by kokonutty View Post
The company may classify an employee as exempt, but that doesn't mean they are legitimately in that category. It's unclear whether the OP does inside sales (usually non-exempt) or outside sales (exempt) because he has cited both mileage policies and office policies. I also question whether his 11-12 hour days include commuting time which is irrelevant. Here's a pretty concise definition of determining whether the classification is correct:
Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) Coverage (Exempt vs. Non-Exempt -- The Online Wages, Hours and Overtime Pay Resource
I think I made it pretty clear that this is outside sales, lol.

My commute is 10 minutes to work.

To the poster that talked about Enkai. We probably would do enkai, if we were in an area that had good public transit like Japan. But yeah, they follow most other work customs.
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Old 11-17-2014, 09:50 PM
 
10,585 posts, read 5,938,566 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by peter_midnight View Post
I think I made it pretty clear that this is outside sales, lol.

My commute is 10 minutes to work.

To the poster that talked about Enkai. We probably would do enkai, if we were in an area that had good public transit like Japan. But yeah, they follow most other work customs.
I don't get it. Do you go to the office every day before going out in the field and return to the office every day before going home? How else would the time your boss leaves the office be a factor and why would you have the same commute time every day if you do outside sales?
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Old 11-18-2014, 03:50 AM
 
270 posts, read 234,957 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kokonutty View Post
I don't get it. Do you go to the office every day before going out in the field and return to the office every day before going home? How else would the time your boss leaves the office be a factor and why would you have the same commute time every day if you do outside sales?
Yes, I go to the office every day before going out in the field and return every day before going home.
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Old 11-18-2014, 04:13 AM
 
Location: UK & Pakistan
183 posts, read 264,244 times
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60 plus hours a week is a hectic and tough job. No matter its sales or any field dear. Try learning fast and apply for a permanent 8 hours per day job.
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Old 11-18-2014, 04:21 AM
 
Location: St Thomas, US Virgin Islands
24,671 posts, read 64,808,860 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by emilywhite View Post
60 plus hours a week is a hectic and tough job. No matter its sales or any field dear. Try learning fast and apply for a permanent 8 hours per day job.
Since you're planning on opening your own business, a 60+ hour week is in your future - dear.
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