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Old 01-17-2015, 09:58 AM
 
57 posts, read 97,321 times
Reputation: 26

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As I have posted a few days ago , I joined a new company three weeks ago and already want out.

I know based off glass door and speaking to other employees im like 5-10k off other employees in similar positions.

My question is , and the main reason I'm looking to leave is , when getting promoted or raises , don't most companies keep it to a certain percentage?

I feel like no matter how many times I may get promoted , because Im underpaid in my original position , I will always be underpaid going forward.

So for example if I start at 50k and the next position is 70k , If 50k is below the standard and is underpaid for the position , they could never bump me up that high to 70k in the new position and thus would always be below the norm.

Is this logic correct?
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Old 01-17-2015, 10:35 AM
 
3,552 posts, read 4,718,512 times
Reputation: 3749
I wouldn't speak to others about their pay, personally. I negotiate pay when I start so I don't feel obligated to dig into situations like these.
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Old 01-17-2015, 10:51 AM
 
Location: ( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°) (╯°□°)╯︵ ┻━┻ ̡
7,112 posts, read 11,908,846 times
Reputation: 3885
What is your industry and how is the "standard" determined? There are many variables with years of experience, location and company size being being a couple of factors.
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Old 01-17-2015, 10:57 AM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
34,136 posts, read 62,077,613 times
Reputation: 38079
No two companies are necessarily the same on that. We have salary grades so for promotions there is a formula since there may be overlap, most of the time the minimum is 8%. For raises, the board budgets a maximum for the year and it's based on the annual performance review, currently the most you can get is 4%. My last promotion was 12%. If your employer started you lower than market, chances are they pay those above you lower also. If you are right, they are either cheap, struggling, or just greedy and minimizing their costs by taking advantage of people willing to work for less than they could get elsewhere. I would not, however, consider Glass Door and "other employees" to be a very reliable measure of what normal pay is for that work.
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Old 01-17-2015, 11:12 AM
 
10,612 posts, read 18,999,263 times
Reputation: 20930
Each employere does their own thing. If you are making less than the industry average you will always be playing catch up and, probably, not getting there. If you are significantly underpaid, expect to have to switch employers to get a pay raise that will take you up to "average" pay.
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Old 01-17-2015, 11:35 AM
 
324 posts, read 362,826 times
Reputation: 631
Depends, but from my experience in order to increase your salary significantly is done through a promotion to a position with a different salary range, or a whole new job/company all together. Annual increases will, for the most part, not be more than 6%, and that's if you're a stellar employee.
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Old 01-17-2015, 12:06 PM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
531 posts, read 1,073,663 times
Reputation: 2419
Even if the company has certain % threshold on raise, your manager can give you another half year review + extra raise.

I agree with Joe from dayton, if you are significant underpaid compare to industry average, switching employer might be a better option.
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Old 01-17-2015, 12:17 PM
 
Location: canada
268 posts, read 527,369 times
Reputation: 117
First of all who cares if you get $$$ for a higher position. HELLO what if you work in that higher position at the same salary for two years? Well then your value increases SIGNIFICANTLY to other companies. So you can literally leave and some times make 50% or 25% more than what you make



This happened to me and while I HATE MY NEW JOB, I earn a respectable income. I can pay for dinners groceries clothing an apartment for random crap. I have a savings account filled with money some how.


The only problem I have now is I can't find a gf or any hobbies besides the same one I've been doing for 16 years
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Old 01-17-2015, 01:34 PM
 
Location: HoCo, MD
4,997 posts, read 8,861,808 times
Reputation: 5799
Quote:
Originally Posted by sportsfan123 View Post
As I have posted a few days ago , I joined a new company three weeks ago and already want out.

I know based off glass door and speaking to other employees im like 5-10k off other employees in similar positions.
You mention being in similar positions - but no indication on performance/experience/accomplishments. These also play a factor in pay. This isn't to say you don't deserve more. But just because the person next to you is being paid more doesn't automatically mean you are underpaid.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sportsfan123 View Post
My question is , and the main reason I'm looking to leave is , when getting promoted or raises , don't most companies keep it to a certain percentage?

I feel like no matter how many times I may get promoted , because Im underpaid in my original position , I will always be underpaid going forward.

So for example if I start at 50k and the next position is 70k , If 50k is below the standard and is underpaid for the position , they could never bump me up that high to 70k in the new position and thus would always be below the norm.

Is this logic correct?
It depends on how companies structures things. Some have salary bands. And in many cases, those bands do overlap. So it is very much possible to be making more than someone at the next level (not to mention there are other factors in play).

As for being underpaid or overpaid. If you can get a higher salary somewhere else, go for it. At the end of the day you have to do what you think is right for you. But 'salary' isn't everything. You can get a good bump in salary with a new job, but actually end up getting less in total compensation.
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Old 01-17-2015, 01:59 PM
 
2,645 posts, read 2,797,111 times
Reputation: 7341
As a former HR professional I will tell you this:

1) More often, people get paid based on where they have BEEN than what they DO.

2) I once received a 25% salary increase without a promotion because the market for my job (computer programming) dictated it. So don't assume there is a cap on raises and promotions. Every company is different, every employee is different, every position is different.

3) Stop comparing salaries among your coworkers and put that energy into proving what an asset you are to your employer. You accepted the job at the pay you were quoted. That means on that day, you were just fine with what you were going to be paid. It sounds like you only became dissatisfied when you discovered a coworker was making more. Unfortunately, that's not grounds for anyone to give you a raise unless you're a union shop.

4) Focus on your job and building up some accomplishments you can show as examples when your performance review comes up. If you want to renegotiate your salary at that time, do so based on the market rate for your job.

5) If you feel you've made a mistake when negotiating your salary, talk to your manager. Find out what you have to do to be paid what your peers are making. Ask for specific and measurable goals, then work on meeting those goals.
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