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Old 03-28-2015, 07:42 PM
 
Location: Lawless Wild West
660 posts, read 815,836 times
Reputation: 990

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I've been seeing jobs request a long-term commitment more and more often. But the thing is, I don't know what they mean by long-term.

Is one year considered long-term or short-term? I want to apply for these jobs, but I do not want to stay in a particular company for more than a year. Reason being is that, although we signed a one year lease again, we have ZERO plans to sign another one year lease, so rain or shine my husband and I ARE planning to relocate after a year. That's it.

This means that I would like a job that I can do part-time for a year or full-time for 6 months or so. After getting screwed over for many many months, I do not think I am emotionally ready as of yet to invest in a full-time job over the long-term, hence, why I think I'll only be able to handle more than forty hours for six months. There are part-time positions for hire but requesting long-term, I do not mind working those for a year, but my question is, is a long-term commitment one year, or is it more than one year?
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Old 03-28-2015, 08:55 PM
 
Location: Saint Paul, MN
1,365 posts, read 1,602,293 times
Reputation: 2971
6-12 months is definitely not a long term commitment. It's subjective, but I would say a long-term commitment would be a minimum of 2 or 3 years.
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Old 03-28-2015, 09:19 PM
Status: "Enjoying the winter" (set 24 days ago)
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
34,062 posts, read 61,944,958 times
Reputation: 37993
One year is far from long term, it's barely more than temporary. I would consider long term to be at least 10 years. That's the new, shorter definition. Until about 10 years ago, long term employment used to be 20-30+ years.
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Old 03-28-2015, 09:48 PM
 
Location: Western Washington
11,299 posts, read 10,017,361 times
Reputation: 18886
One year max is not long term.

I would say that long term means you have no definite plans to leave. You might stay 5 years, you might stay for life.
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Old 03-28-2015, 10:06 PM
 
1,778 posts, read 2,112,085 times
Reputation: 4075
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sabiya View Post
I've been seeing jobs request a long-term commitment more and more often. But the thing is, I don't know what they mean by long-term.

Is one year considered long-term or short-term? I want to apply for these jobs, but I do not want to stay in a particular company for more than a year. Reason being is that, although we signed a one year lease again, we have ZERO plans to sign another one year lease, so rain or shine my husband and I ARE planning to relocate after a year. That's it.

This means that I would like a job that I can do part-time for a year or full-time for 6 months or so. After getting screwed over for many many months, I do not think I am emotionally ready as of yet to invest in a full-time job over the long-term, hence, why I think I'll only be able to handle more than forty hours for six months. There are part-time positions for hire but requesting long-term, I do not mind working those for a year, but my question is, is a long-term commitment one year, or is it more than one year?
You're in an at-will state. That means they can fire you whenever they want, and you can leave whenever you want. So, don't sweat it. Just MHO.
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Old 03-28-2015, 10:54 PM
 
Location: Ontario, NY
3,070 posts, read 6,792,553 times
Reputation: 3330
My opinion differs, anything under 6 months is short term unemployed, anything over 6 months long term unemployed
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Old 03-29-2015, 07:33 AM
 
16,380 posts, read 19,649,118 times
Reputation: 14297
Long term usually means "as long as the company wants to keep you".

In reality, they want you to consider staying there with no end date in sight. 5 years, 10 years and even longer from the employer's point of view, unless they decide they no longer need you. Then you are told to pack your desk and leave the same day.

But if they ask you the old interview question "Where do you see yourself in 5 years?". Your answer better include working at that employer in some capacity, else you won't get the job if they are advertising they want a long term committment.
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Old 03-29-2015, 07:51 AM
 
12,799 posts, read 16,485,545 times
Reputation: 8823
Depends on occupation. Engineering or IT, anything over a year. Law, anything under 10 is short term.
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Old 03-29-2015, 08:22 AM
 
10,591 posts, read 18,959,658 times
Reputation: 20815
It depends on the industry, the specific business, and turnover. One year at a burger joint may make you a long term employee, while it may take five years someplace else to be considered long term. My cousin has worked at a place for 12-15 years (I don't remember exactly how long) and, while he is a long term employe, he is still the junior man. Depending on the employee, I generally consider long term to be somewhere in the five to ten year mark.
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Old 03-29-2015, 08:29 AM
 
Location: Suburb of Chicago
28,029 posts, read 13,112,381 times
Reputation: 26774
I agree with Joe that every company is going to have their own notion about what constitutes long term. I once thought long term meant 10 plus years. I now think it could mean five plus years.

Personally, I would wonder about companies who add this to their job postings because either they're hiring a majority of young people, who do tend to job hop and they haven't figured that out, or they have a revolving door because of internal problems and they aren't recognizing it.
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