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Old 04-17-2017, 10:18 PM
 
1,095 posts, read 836,544 times
Reputation: 560

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Hi,

I took a career test (I took it numerous times over a span of a few months to make sure it had consistent results) and each time I've gotten a top match for a position in Social Work (Substance and Abuse counselor) or in a Labor Relations/Human Relations role. Also on that list was a Cosmetic Sales Rep...who am I kidding, that's what I REALLY want to do! . But, seriously, I think I agree with the test and feel if I could find a way to mix my (thus far brief) experience with nonprofits and social work, I'd be happy. Currently I work for a nonprofit doing data entry, but am trying to transfer over to more of a "human side" to the nonprofit.

For example, I really would feel satisfied working for a company that helps people with disabilities get assistance, or working towards helping others (like suicide prevention). I've tried the corporate world (contractor at Apple) and know if that's your thing you could possibly make a good living out of working in the corporate world, but I don't think that kinda life is for me.

Thus, at the end of the day, I was hoping for advice on both industries. From what I gathered, HR seems to be dealing with clients and potential hires (and some fires), and performing other various tasks (but I know it's much more complicated than just what is on the surface). And Social Work seems to be about working with the community or those with disabilities. Again, I know it's more complicated than that perhaps, but on the surface, that's what I gathered.

Any helpful advice on either or both? Thanks!
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Old 04-17-2017, 10:57 PM
 
Location: Seattle
3,063 posts, read 1,698,030 times
Reputation: 6034
In my HR career I've learned that people who approach it as Social Work burn out and fail, not necessarily in that order.

From my Social Work career I learned failure is common, often with profound results.

That reads darker than intended.
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Old 04-17-2017, 11:26 PM
 
1,095 posts, read 836,544 times
Reputation: 560
Thanks Sockeye, I appreciate the reply :-).
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Old 04-18-2017, 03:58 AM
 
11,476 posts, read 3,602,438 times
Reputation: 12678
HR are glorified paper pushers. They pretty much do what they are told/allowed to do for the company. They do not work for the employees, but uphold company policies, and most HR people have very little knowledge of what the job functions of employees are. This is why the advice to job seekers is always to bypass HR and figure out WHO is actually hiring (supervisor) and get resume to that particular person. Every place I have worked, HR has been crappy. They aren't helpful to employees because they don;t *care* about employees. THey tow the company line.

Recruiters work more for employers but specifically for placing candidates. It's faster paced, but can make a decent living at it if you good at it. You have to be a real people person though.

Social work is a dead end, low wage job. And burnout is high. I would avoid, I know people who have done it. For the pay, the job isn't worth it. Volunteer instead.
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Old 04-18-2017, 08:45 AM
 
9,215 posts, read 13,162,289 times
Reputation: 10736
Quote:
Originally Posted by Denver303TJC View Post
Hi,

I took a career test (I took it numerous times over a span of a few months to make sure it had consistent results) and each time I've gotten a top match for a position in Social Work (Substance and Abuse counselor) or in a Labor Relations/Human Relations role. Also on that list was a Cosmetic Sales Rep...who am I kidding, that's what I REALLY want to do! . But, seriously, I think I agree with the test and feel if I could find a way to mix my (thus far brief) experience with nonprofits and social work, I'd be happy. Currently I work for a nonprofit doing data entry, but am trying to transfer over to more of a "human side" to the nonprofit.

For example, I really would feel satisfied working for a company that helps people with disabilities get assistance, or working towards helping others (like suicide prevention). I've tried the corporate world (contractor at Apple) and know if that's your thing you could possibly make a good living out of working in the corporate world, but I don't think that kinda life is for me.

Thus, at the end of the day, I was hoping for advice on both industries. From what I gathered, HR seems to be dealing with clients and potential hires (and some fires), and performing other various tasks (but I know it's much more complicated than just what is on the surface). And Social Work seems to be about working with the community or those with disabilities. Again, I know it's more complicated than that perhaps, but on the surface, that's what I gathered.

Any helpful advice on either or both? Thanks!
My opinion of HR is that you're working for a company, but not doing what the company does. But that's totally just me.

The HR/marketing people at my company get paid pretty decently and their job is easy. Sometimes they spend all day coming up with pretty posters and emails for the company party or for work functions. The head of HR does more than that, and works pretty hard but her job isn't bad. They're not tasked with either 1) bringing in work or 2) doing the work, so it's a pretty chill job.

Social work is probably the complete opposite end of the spectrum. Hard work, that is stressful, for less pay.

However, I have no doubt that I would personally choose social work. I still think of going into it now.

It all depends on what you want out of life. If you think a job is a job and want to enjoy life outside of work more, then no doubt go into HR. If you must do something that has meaning, then no doubt go into MSW.
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Old 04-18-2017, 09:22 AM
 
1,095 posts, read 836,544 times
Reputation: 560
Thanks everyone, these were all great replies! :-)

How about working in the nonprofit sector as a career? Is that track perhaps more fulfilling, but not very high paying?

Thanks again!
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Old 04-18-2017, 09:37 AM
 
11,476 posts, read 3,602,438 times
Reputation: 12678
Quote:
Originally Posted by Denver303TJC View Post
Thanks everyone, these were all great replies! :-)

How about working in the nonprofit sector as a career? Is that track perhaps more fulfilling, but not very high paying?

Thanks again!
I think you need to focus more on what you actually want to do.

Nonprofits and for profits have pretty much the same job descriptions. Some pay less, some pay more. I have a friend that works for a nonprofit as a maintenance tech. Would you want to work for a nonprofit as a maintenance tech?

And if you are a grant writer/business development person, yeah you can make a lot.

Again, I think you need to focus on job TASKS to figure out what you would want to do.
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Old 04-18-2017, 09:48 AM
 
9,215 posts, read 13,162,289 times
Reputation: 10736
Quote:
Originally Posted by newtovenice View Post
I think you need to focus more on what you actually want to do.

Nonprofits and for profits have pretty much the same job descriptions. Some pay less, some pay more. I have a friend that works for a nonprofit as a maintenance tech. Would you want to work for a nonprofit as a maintenance tech?

And if you are a grant writer/business development person, yeah you can make a lot.

Again, I think you need to focus on job TASKS to figure out what you would want to do.
I have the same opinion of non-profits from what I have heard. They have all of the same office politics, arse kissing, favoritism, stress of the private sector. It's just a label.
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Old 04-18-2017, 09:54 AM
 
11,476 posts, read 3,602,438 times
Reputation: 12678
Quote:
Originally Posted by jobaba View Post
I have the same opinion of non-profits from what I have heard. They have all of the same office politics, arse kissing, favoritism, stress of the private sector. It's just a label.
Yep. It's just another "business model" with "tax benefits." They also focus a lot on appearances as they HAVE to portray a certain image. For example, there are a LOT of marine life rehabs where I live. Yet every single person working with the animals who interacts with the public is a cute, thin girl in her early 20s, usually with long hair. All of them. So no males applied for those jobs? No one older than 25 applied? No girls with short hair?

Just an OT observation.
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Old 04-18-2017, 10:57 AM
 
Location: Somewhere in America
13,317 posts, read 12,213,094 times
Reputation: 22922
Those career tests always crack me up. I don't put any faith into them. I've had them come back and say I should be a farmer to an accountant while I was in school to be an accountant. A lot of them are based on your interests and your education. While I think it's nice to place flowers in my window boxes every spring, I have ZERO desire to be a farmer!
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