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Old 07-26-2008, 07:39 PM
 
21 posts, read 22,717 times
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I am considering going to this small private college in my area that offers a 2 year program in IP Telephony and was wondering if this would be a practical feild of study to secure steady future employment.
The schools IP Telephony degree program teaches students the fundamentals of Cisco network and VoIP, claiming after graduation, that I will possess all the knowledge and skills needed to be successful in an IP Telephony career. I'm told by the school that completing the VoIP degree, will completely prepare me for a great and lucrative career in IT. That I'll gain skills in Computer networking, telephony, computer programming, project planning and business communication.

Could someone familiar with this tell me what to expect from a school like this or what to expect upon entering this field of work after completion of such a program? Pay, areas where entry level workers might end up, what the daily routine would be and most important....is this a practical field to secure future employment?
Any help would be greatly appreciated.
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Old 07-27-2008, 02:37 PM
 
21 posts, read 22,717 times
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It would be great if someone had some first hand information on this so I don't make a mistake and pick the wrong field of study. Won't anyone help me?
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Old 07-27-2008, 04:53 PM
 
3,088 posts, read 8,209,057 times
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contact a company in the telephony field and ask
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Old 07-28-2008, 07:49 AM
 
Location: The DMV
5,845 posts, read 9,876,726 times
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What's your IT background??

Telecomm is going to grow as convergence continues (the combination of data/voice/video). However, there is also a wide variety of opportunities in this area.... from technicians that does daily moves, adds, and changes; to engineers that will architect networks taht will have to support all communication needs. And the pay will differ greatly.

What I've seen is an influx of people who go to these schools and expect to make the upper level of that salary band..... and that is simply not going to happen. We've all heard the radio adds etc... "come to our school and get Microsoft certified... the average Microsoft certified engineer makes 80K"... yada yada yada. What they don't tell you is that those that make 80K probably have been doing it for 5 or more years or live and breath computers.

Bottom line, entry level technicians make 35K or so.... depending on where you live. This is a field that covets experience more than "education". Expecially in this climate where we are no longer in the dot com days.

I'm not trying to discourage you, but what they've fed you is more marketing schpeal than an economic forcast. I don't know how much this school costs, but you need to determine if that investment is worth it. Just to give you an idea, when you do get the degree/cert, you'll be competing with experienced network administrators, system admins, and current telecom engineers for positions.... how will you stack up? You may be no worse off by getting an entry level IT position (helpdesk) and work your way up....
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Old 07-28-2008, 10:35 AM
 
21 posts, read 22,717 times
Reputation: 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by macroy View Post
What's your IT background??

Telecomm is going to grow as convergence continues (the combination of data/voice/video). However, there is also a wide variety of opportunities in this area.... from technicians that does daily moves, adds, and changes; to engineers that will architect networks taht will have to support all communication needs. And the pay will differ greatly.

What I've seen is an influx of people who go to these schools and expect to make the upper level of that salary band..... and that is simply not going to happen. We've all heard the radio adds etc... "come to our school and get Microsoft certified... the average Microsoft certified engineer makes 80K"... yada yada yada. What they don't tell you is that those that make 80K probably have been doing it for 5 or more years or live and breath computers.

Bottom line, entry level technicians make 35K or so.... depending on where you live. This is a field that covets experience more than "education". Expecially in this climate where we are no longer in the dot com days.

I'm not trying to discourage you, but what they've fed you is more marketing schpeal than an economic forcast. I don't know how much this school costs, but you need to determine if that investment is worth it. Just to give you an idea, when you do get the degree/cert, you'll be competing with experienced network administrators, system admins, and current telecom engineers for positions.... how will you stack up? You may be no worse off by getting an entry level IT position (helpdesk) and work your way up....
I have to IT background to speak of and only basic understanding of computers. I have just been doing some reading and this sounds interesting to me on the surface. I just thought I could learn everything in school because they advertise (Rasmussen College) that the student would master everything.

The city I live in is somewhat limited but does have a few area achools and really want to get training for something interesting that will provide a decent living in a relatively short period of time (2 year or less). Do you have any suggestions?
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Old 07-28-2008, 10:37 AM
 
21 posts, read 22,717 times
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* I have no IT background
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Old 07-28-2008, 04:11 PM
 
Location: In my mind
630 posts, read 2,157,595 times
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I agree with macroy, there is no way you will learn all of that information, especially if you don't have any IT background or basic knowledge of networks and cryptology. There are compliance documents that businesses must be aware of and if they're not, you should be (depending upon your job classification).

Personally I think the term "IT Field" is broad brush stroke. There are so many fields and specialties within that term. I for one have been working in Information Assurance for over 10years and my job is titled Information Assurance Engineer and it falls under "IT".

I think people need to be more specific about what they want to do within "IT" otherwise you could just end up working at the computer help desk. Which in a lot of companies falls under "IT". You can always start there then see what other opportunities there are in the area and see what qualifications they require.

For example, if you want to work in IA (Information Assurance) which includes C&A (certification and accreditation), system/network analysis and hardening, network penetration testing, auditing, forensics ....etc. All jobs require that you have certifications and the one they all specify is the CISSP (Certified Information System Security Professional).

Personally I really enjoy my profession and I'm really glad I got in early so I can see the changes and the opportunities out there. As a clarification I didn't get into this field at a young age, I was in my mid/late 30's. So what I mean by early is closer to the ground floor before the term "IT field" became so large.

Last edited by MagicTouch; 07-28-2008 at 04:20 PM..
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Old 07-28-2008, 06:18 PM
 
Location: Fort Worth/Dallas
11,884 posts, read 35,471,643 times
Reputation: 5657
Quote:
Originally Posted by telephony View Post
I am considering going to this small private college in my area that offers a 2 year program in IP Telephony and was wondering if this would be a practical feild of study to secure steady future employment.
The schools IP Telephony degree program teaches students the fundamentals of Cisco network and VoIP, claiming after graduation, that I will possess all the knowledge and skills needed to be successful in an IP Telephony career. I'm told by the school that completing the VoIP degree, will completely prepare me for a great and lucrative career in IT. That I'll gain skills in Computer networking, telephony, computer programming, project planning and business communication.

Could someone familiar with this tell me what to expect from a school like this or what to expect upon entering this field of work after completion of such a program? Pay, areas where entry level workers might end up, what the daily routine would be and most important....is this a practical field to secure future employment?
Any help would be greatly appreciated.

I work for a telecommunications company that does just these types of things.

The technology about which you speak may be around for another ten years; therefore you "could" end up having a lucrative career for that amount of time.

However, I would be wary of devoting a career to a specific technology as technology changes very rapidly these days.

It could get your foot in the door at a major telecom company and you could then progress to other technologies through corporate training and such.

Good luck!
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Old 01-29-2009, 07:32 PM
 
Location: Austin, Texas
729 posts, read 1,957,768 times
Reputation: 464
Did you get the advise you were looking for? I am a 4 year Cisco Contact Center Engineer. Let me know.
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Old 01-30-2009, 06:16 PM
 
451 posts, read 1,182,206 times
Reputation: 216
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smooth from ELP View Post
Did you get the advise you were looking for? I am a 4 year Cisco Contact Center Engineer. Let me know.
Making that good money. Living in austin you prob work for eloyalty.

On a side note, I love voice. I just kinda feel into it. Make sure you get with a good place where you have VOICE, and other job duties like dabbling in firewalls and learning about MPLS. The demand is high for VOIP guys, but the skills just ain't here yet. Go for it, but don't expect that big paying job and remember that you will always have to continue to learn.
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