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Old 10-17-2008, 01:33 AM
 
193 posts, read 1,088,583 times
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What do you think would be a decent salary for someone working as a web / database database developer for 8 years?
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Old 10-17-2008, 02:16 AM
 
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Could be anything from say $70K-ish to $120K-ish depending on the particulars. I see 6 figure numbers on the west coast for C#/.Net/fill in the blank with 100 other new "technologies", fairly regularly.

Jump on CareerBuilder.com and search for the acronyms related to what you do and take a look.

That having been said, I know one former Lucent guy that was making 6 figures at a place we both used to work at. He still ended up with an upside down mortgage and ended up walking away from it (in Orange County). So, although salaries are higher on the left coast, cost of living eats it up. There's no free lunch, so to speak. Employers factor all that into thier salary ranges.

As always, the best (and often most difficult thing to do) in IT is to catch the next rising wave. Unfortunately, it's always easier for an employer to pidgeon hole folks doing the old stuff into a corner and hire someone new to do the new stuff. Rather than letting you stay cutting edge, and thus having to put up with two people feeling thier way around something new to each individual.

In any event, you should be able to get six figures in the right market, with the right skills/programming tools on your resume.
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Old 10-18-2008, 12:45 AM
 
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thank you, that helps a lot.. any ideas on what someone could do as a next step if they've been the web/database field for that amount of time..and don't want to be a programmer anymore? am thinking project management? any other tips... ? thanks!
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Old 10-18-2008, 12:57 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chicagoresident View Post
thank you, that helps a lot.. any ideas on what someone could do as a next step if they've been the web/database field for that amount of time..and don't want to be a programmer anymore? am thinking project management? any other tips... ? thanks!
Well, that is the $69 question for programmers who have burned out and realized that it's all just one big study in details, LOL!

Years ago, managers I worked under in Fortune 500's generally said, "When I got tired of pushing bits [this was mainframe era] I got an MBA and went into management."

Thing is, that era of corporate paternalism is long over. I'm not entirely sure what the path is these days. From what I've seen in smaller software companies it can be largely political, with no clear cut answer. Just my experience though. Beyond some point in any company, it becomes political, LOL!

Then I've met others who feel the security is in being *uber* technical, so that they will always be in demand. (Admitted, hard to do in this field because there's so many specialities these days. Which one will have staying power, right?)

So short answer, I can't say with certainty.

I know I burned out on it in the mid 90's and started Law School. Personal circumstances drew me back into it and I dropped Law School. Though the legal field is glutted, I still look back at the decision to drop as the biggest mistake I ever made, LOL!

So I've wanted something better for a long time.

This is going be be somewhat of a non-answer, but... I'd say ask yourself, "What do really want to be next?"

Then set about to obtain the credentials to do that.

As for project management. There definitely seems to be a market for it. But if the economy stays flat for a long time, one has to wonder, "How many projects will there be to manage?"

Not saying don't do it. Just saying I've no crystal ball at present, and all the old rules may be about to change.

Now, if I had kids, I'd be advocating that they look at the independant professions. Law, Medicine, etc. Credentials that would allow you to choose either working at " Big Law" or hanging your own shingle, for example.

Granted, that's probably not what you had in mind.
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Old 10-18-2008, 10:25 AM
 
Location: very near Georgetown, KY
197 posts, read 694,289 times
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Career Builder is a J O K E

It is well known (google it) that a lot of that stuff you see on their site is fabricated by employers looking to stock up on resumes. Also, Career Builder makes A LOT of money from those folks who are suckered into 'buying' their way to the tops of the so-called resume piles. Stay away from that site, you're much better off going door to door, handing each employer a copy of your resume.
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Old 10-18-2008, 11:53 AM
f_m
 
2,289 posts, read 7,803,588 times
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I found payscale.com to be the most useful in this regard, because it is populated by the other people looking for the same stats too. So you get to compare with people of the same situation, not statistics incorrectly compiled by organizations.

You might do well to find a job in your field, but with a company that will pay for part of your schooling if you want another degree.
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Old 10-18-2008, 12:18 PM
 
193 posts, read 1,088,583 times
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thanks for the replies...JMadison, you're right.. I've come across some ppl that said the best way to get out of IT is to go for a MBA. Not so sure if that's really what I want to do.. am thinking about taking some classes on the design side for starters.. flash, indesign, etc and see if I can do something with those skills..if nothing, then atleast I'll learn how to use some cool tools..although seems like it's pretty competitive in this field as well..
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Old 10-20-2008, 04:55 AM
 
Location: Seattle, WA
1,368 posts, read 6,138,239 times
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Yeah, those are pretty competitive. I'm in IT, but on the technician side, and finding a job isn't always easy.

I don't think that we're going to see a shortage of people needing project managers anytime soon. One thing that I've found thus far, is that if you're at a small company (10-50 people), you'll often find yourself multitasking and doing more than just one thing than if you're at a large company..

aka, if you're good at something now, but want to learn new skills, etc... a small company is more likely to spring for that, or allow you to experiment, etc while there. Bigger companies tend to 'pigeon hole' as JMadison said.


If you wanted to, you could look at getting into networking. Very few net admins (that I've met) have a good programming base and are thus limited in some regards.
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Old 10-23-2008, 04:16 AM
 
1,525 posts, read 3,507,932 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheTransientTranny View Post
Career Builder is a J O K E

It is well known (google it) that a lot of that stuff you see on their site is fabricated by employers looking to stock up on resumes. Also, Career Builder makes A LOT of money from those folks who are suckered into 'buying' their way to the tops of the so-called resume piles. Stay away from that site, you're much better off going door to door, handing each employer a copy of your resume.

No doubt, all the career sites are trying to monetize thier webspace, LOL!

But, I have had serious responses from the Fort 500 type companies that post there, as well as Dice.com and a few others. There *are* employers on them.

I've also gone the other route. Starting with a list of major companies and checking each company of interest's career page.

In any event, I personally would push any children or younger folks I know toward independant professions where you can choose between hanging your own shingle or going with "Big Law", "Big Finance", or "Big Medicine" at your discretion.

The observation of my life has been that the "start in the ranks and climb the ranks" thing is pyramidal. So at each level it's more rarified. So... what you need to do to stay ahead of the widening class gap is to get into a field where the relationship of what you do to the cost of living is known to be positive at the outset. (Just my opinion.)

Example, while thumbing through CareerBuilder the other day... Software Engineers were in a broad range from about $60K to $120K... Psychiatrist... $250K-$290K... But of course the up front commitment is many, many years of school and residency.

But where I young and had the understanding of things then, that I have now, I'd go for that sort of career. Not neccesarily Medicine, but something where the income is known to be very high from the start. I would not have wasted time working full time (even though it was in my field) and getting the degree "on the side".

In retrospect, the deal would be, "Go Ivy League, aim for the highest paying thing I think I could stand to do, retire as early as possible", LOL!
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