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Old 03-10-2011, 05:01 PM
 
233 posts, read 539,797 times
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St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador.
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Old 03-10-2011, 06:50 PM
 
Location: Miami, FL
187 posts, read 542,702 times
Reputation: 187
Like others have said, pretty much anywhere in Western Europe would fit the majority of those criteria. The only problem is the cost of living. Everything in Europe is more expensive, Housing, food, utilities. So you need to watch out for that.

Another region that immediately sprung to mind was Latin America. A lot of the cities are designed in the European style, so you do get a sense of being in Europe without the enormous cost of living. Walkability might not be at the level it is in most European cities, but generally you can get around in the big cities without owning a car, if that's what you want. Some cities to look at would be Mexico, Buenos Aires, and - although they're technically not in Latin America - Some of the big cities in Brazil (Sao Paulo, Rio, Belo Horizonte). I am not too sure about Brazil but I know that in Mexico you can get away with just English just fine in most places until you get better at Spanish. The people are very friendly, similar culture to the United States/Europe without the rude people and high cost of living. I don't know whether you would consider Mexico an option since it's not in the same standard of living at the US/Europe/Japan but it is considered first world. I don't know about work either, but things are a lot cheaper there. You should consider it.
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Old 03-10-2011, 07:13 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati, OH (for now)
58 posts, read 147,369 times
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Studying abroad in Europe is definitely more expensive than studying in the US. Also, becoming a permanent citizen on your own is not an easy task. You're going to have to find a man or woman who wants to marry you so you both can have the benefit of dual citizenship.

To state that you want to move to another place, and that you are sick of the US makes it seem like you are young and unexperienced in world travel. Make sure you visit a place more than once because I used to say the same thing quite often, only to find out after a few trips that I really did value the situation I have in the US.

Take some extended trips abroad. I used to go to places for 3-4 months at a time trying to find my ideal place, and I some how ended up in the same area I came from. For some people, cultural differences are to distinct and it will only take experience to realize this. Some people embrace other cultures, but you should find out first before you commit yourself for 2 years and end up hating it.
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Old 03-10-2011, 09:11 PM
 
212 posts, read 400,814 times
Reputation: 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by alyssa123 View Post
barcelona seems like such an amazing city with warm humid weather and beaches (im used to humidity..trust me im from jersey). having a vibrant city full of art right next to a beach would be absolutely amazing

however i head spain is at 30% unemployment right now so hopefully it recovers in the next couple years..not too sure tho
You don't have to worry about the 30% as far as you are a student Or you want to work there after graduate school? That's a different story.

Barcelona is a great city! And you will be able to learn two languages there: Spanish and Catalan
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Old 03-10-2011, 09:45 PM
 
Location: Columbus, Ohio
1,412 posts, read 4,493,642 times
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Osaka, Japan could fit the bill.
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Old 03-11-2011, 05:50 PM
 
Location: NJ
2,210 posts, read 7,037,816 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alyssa123 View Post
america just isnt doing it for me..dont like it much here.im looking to go to college then live and work in a area that:

-is a pedestrian friendly city (walking,biking,public transport; NOT angry rush hour drivers)

-easygoing people to become friends with

-where id be able to find a job in interior design

-has lots of shops & parks

-always has something to do

-is decently affordable (considering ill be going to college and living there immediatly after college too)

language isnt a barrier, im open to learning almost any language.if a city meets any of the cirteria listed above, tell me
Start with other parts of the US than Jersey. Austin TX springs to mind as a great starting point and you mentioned that humidity doesn't bother you. Very pedestrian friendly, great atmosphere and affordable. University of Texas Austin offers a Bachelors in Interior Design at the School of Architecture.
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Old 03-11-2011, 06:50 PM
 
230 posts, read 906,687 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AnthonyB View Post
Start with other parts of the US than Jersey. Austin TX springs to mind as a great starting point and you mentioned that humidity doesn't bother you. Very pedestrian friendly, great atmosphere and affordable. University of Texas Austin offers a Bachelors in Interior Design at the School of Architecture.

I have never understood how Austin is considered pedestrian friendly. Sure there are a few blocks you can walk around in the center and there are hiking trails and the UT campus, but other than that Austin is about as stripmallville as most places in the sunbelt of the US. Try not owning a car there. Portland Oregon is about a thousand times more pedestrian friendly and even it is not amazingly so compared to many cities in Europe.
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Old 03-11-2011, 09:53 PM
 
Location: NJ
2,210 posts, read 7,037,816 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nesne View Post
I have never understood how Austin is considered pedestrian friendly. Sure there are a few blocks you can walk around in the center and there are hiking trails and the UT campus, but other than that Austin is about as stripmallville as most places in the sunbelt of the US. Try not owning a car there. Portland Oregon is about a thousand times more pedestrian friendly and even it is not amazingly so compared to many cities in Europe.
Students tend to live around campuses and there is a bus system to the city center, which compared to NJ is incredibly walkable.
Portland you are right about.
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Old 03-13-2011, 05:18 PM
 
11 posts, read 30,305 times
Reputation: 14
^ portland seems kinda interesting, esp considering the fact that its a big place for art.is there alot to do there?
still pretty interested in barcelona
@Cubanfrommiami- yes, latin america does seem like such an intresting place with a great atmosphere, ill have to look into some of those places!
@cincykc, that would be a dream if i was able to do that..but considering im only 16 im not rolling in the $$$ that it'd cost to travel anywhere
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Old 03-13-2011, 05:51 PM
 
24,418 posts, read 27,106,254 times
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You're only 16...your mind will change a lot by the time you graduate college lol.

I was going to give a lengthy response, but if you're only 16, there's no point...I'm 23 and graduated from college last year, trust me you will change your mind a lot from now until then.

All I will say is...work and save some money, you don't need a lot and once you graduate high school, go backpacking across Europe for the summer and see which city(s) and country(s) you enjoy. You can stay at hostels, which are really cheap and full of other students doing the same thing. I spent a couple years living overseas in Australia and loved it! Don't let anyone tell you it's a bad idea because you only live once and there will always be time to make money. Experience and travel while you're young and before you start a career or family.

If you study abroad you will pay your US school's tuition + additional fees, so it'd be cheaper to transfer schools, backpack, or work abroad program for a summer.

...as far as pedestrian friendly cities in the US...San Francisco, Boston, New York City, Chicago are the best.
Portland is a great city though and the downtown is pedestrian friendly .
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