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Old 04-08-2011, 12:20 PM
 
Location: West Coast of Europe
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I assume foreign languages are also an issue. Thus there are hardly any foreign movies or series in the US. Subtitles are not a good solution anywhere.

NPR sometimes broadcasts reports on foreign countries. But it is not overly popular among the bulk of standard Americans.

But I think apart from two or three big events around the globe, hardly any country is really interested in things that don't directly affect them. Same here in Portugal. Movies and series from the US or Britain usually show after midnight.
At least we have one progressive channel that focuses on international things, arts, etc. Most European countries have such a channel, for instance ARTE in Germany and France.

 
Old 04-08-2011, 05:11 PM
 
25,021 posts, read 27,926,138 times
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Quite frankly, I couldn't care what would be going on around the world. The Europeans are not paying for my local services, and what goes on in the world is certainly not of vital importance in my life, nor in most other people's. We have our own issues to be preoccupied with

Quote:
Originally Posted by Shankapotomus View Post
Well, I can only speak for myself as an American, but I am and have always been not only interested in other countries and cultures but sympathetic to their struggles with the United States. Many times reading the history of our relationships with other cultures and nations my take on right and wrong has made me side with the other country or culture instead of my own.

And in that light, I agree with you. There are highly nationalistic attitudes by a large swath of Americans, usually on the Right of the political spectrum.
The Political Left in the U.S. is much less likely to fall into Jingoism.
There's that favorite liberal word again
 
Old 04-08-2011, 07:00 PM
 
Location: Fishers, IN
6,485 posts, read 12,532,342 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theunbrainwashed View Post
Quite frankly, I couldn't care what would be going on around the world. The Europeans are not paying for my local services, and what goes on in the world is certainly not of vital importance in my life, nor in most other people's. We have our own issues to be preoccupied with

Really? Why do you think that gasoline is now nearly $4/gallon? Do you think the U.S. economy depends on domestic consumption only, and do you really believe that events around the world have no impact on our economy?
 
Old 04-08-2011, 07:24 PM
 
Location: Viña del Mar, Chile
16,391 posts, read 30,924,278 times
Reputation: 16643
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shankapotomus View Post
Well, I can only speak for myself as an American, but I am and have always been not only interested in other countries and cultures but sympathetic to their struggles with the United States. Many times reading the history of our relationships with other cultures and nations my take on right and wrong has made me side with the other country or culture instead of my own.

And in that light, I agree with you. There are highly nationalistic attitudes by a large swath of Americans, usually on the Right of the political spectrum.
The Political Left in the U.S. is much less likely to fall into Jingoism.

And the Left wing is filled with cultural reletivists and people who will cry over every necessary action. For a left winger, it is a bad thing to have any pride in the nation that is your own, because it might offend a minority. Left wing is just another word for no backbone.
 
Old 04-08-2011, 08:09 PM
 
Location: Tucson/Nogales
23,218 posts, read 29,031,323 times
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The number of Americans possessing passports (25% and subtract the int'l business travelers who have one only because it's mandatory) tells the story quite well of the insularity of adventure-less Americans.

Those who have traveled around the world, suffer as a result of it, like myself. So, to supplement the daily newspaper and television media, I subscribe to The Economist. Gotta know what's going on in the countries I've traveled to, over the years.

Who's going to be the next President of Gautemala or Peru? Far more interested in those outcomes than the predictable elections in my own country.

Last edited by tijlover; 04-08-2011 at 08:10 PM.. Reason: edit
 
Old 04-08-2011, 08:20 PM
 
Location: Viña del Mar, Chile
16,391 posts, read 30,924,278 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tijlover View Post
The number of Americans possessing passports (25% and subtract the int'l business travelers who have one only because it's mandatory) tells the story quite well of the insularity of adventure-less Americans.

Those who have traveled around the world, suffer as a result of it, like myself. So, to supplement the daily newspaper and television media, I subscribe to The Economist. Gotta know what's going on in the countries I've traveled to, over the years.

Who's going to be the next President of Gautemala or Peru? Far more interested in those outcomes than the predictable elections in my own country.
The only thing we suffer from is the ignorance of other countries who believe everything they see in Hollywood. People like to say Americans are so bad because we don't leave the country, but traveling to another state is like traveling to another country in europe, and its safe to say just as many americans go to a different state than europeans who go to other countries. Just because a european can go to their neighboring country for 75 euros doesnt make them better than an american because they have to pay 1000 per ticket just to leave the country. Then try to get a family to do that.

The true idiots are the people in other countries who believe everything they see in the movies, or everything they see in the media and then judge Americans based on it. Americans face a double standard throughout the world, we're constantly judged by people who have never visited our country, yet they call us ignorant for having opinions on people who we've never met. Its downright moronic to call a country more "open minded" than america. Try going to South America, they have their eyes more shut than you could imagine.

One thing I learned about being out of the country, is how lucky I am to be American.

Last edited by intelfan11315; 04-08-2011 at 08:34 PM..
 
Old 04-08-2011, 09:25 PM
 
Location: Tucson/Nogales
23,218 posts, read 29,031,323 times
Reputation: 32620
I think your underestimating the Europeans when it comes to adventure, restricting their movements to neighboring countries.

Wherever I've been in the world (and I don't do the big tourist spots) I'm forever running to Europeans, all over South America (why? because their tourist dollars go the furthest down there?) and where are my fellow Americans? In Pokara, Nepal, Bangkok, Europeans everywhere! I once read that Europeans are the most adventuresome travelers in the world, but I think there's a different reason for that: they love cheapstake traveling. They can spend a month doing $2 bed hostels in South America, whereas, if they stayed in Europe, their money would disappear too quickly.

I'm the same way, which fuels my adventure travel, I'm a cheapstake traveler. I never paid more than $15 a nite a room in Ecuador (or more than $25 a nite anywhere in South America) for 16 days, and if I had stayed in the U.S., my travel budget would have been wiped out in less than a week!

I live in Las Vegas, I walk my pet ferret on the Strip a couple nites a week, and I run into tourists from all over the world: India, Japan, China, Europe, South America, and bless their hearts! many I can carry on a decent converstion with their noble attempts at speaking English.

As far as insularity, lack of adventure, in other parts of the world, admittedly, Americans are not alone. It's always shocked me, given the small size of some Central American republics, to talk to natives there who have never crossed their neighboring borders. And I've talked to too many Mexicans who have never ventured south of their border, laughingly, from many, saying it's too dangerous! Oh please!
 
Old 04-08-2011, 10:30 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,554 posts, read 86,948,301 times
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People who go to great lengths to justify their own ignorance, wind up proving it, as well.
 
Old 04-08-2011, 11:14 PM
 
4,282 posts, read 15,746,975 times
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Mod Note:

Kudos to the contributors to this rather provocative thread for sticking with civil, well-reasoned responses.

Why the OP would choose the World forum to discuss the USA is a little confusing, though.

The thread will be closed, and the member is welcome to move his inquiry over to the General US forum if he wishes.
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