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Old 09-22-2011, 02:01 AM
 
Location: Macao
16,265 posts, read 43,000,763 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SophieLL View Post
Yeah, but, then again, those comparison are translating pesos to dollars, wich makes BA cheap ONLY for foreingers. I mean the cost of living as if i earn 3000 pesos a month here and can, lets say, go to the movies only one time per month cause thats all i can do with that money, and if i go to New York, and earn 3000 dollars there, i can go to the movies maybe 3 or 4 times.
The problem with $3,000 in New York City...and in US Dollars...is the cost of rent. If you want your own little studio apartment, you are probably looking at $1,500-2,000 a month, unless you want to live in a very poor violent crime-infested area and it might be cheaper. Take in mind your studio apartment is just four walls, no bedroom or anything. Just a little room. That's typical in NYC.

So, yeah, you could make it in NYC. I highly doubt you'd be going to many fancy restaurants, but Mcdonalds is a bit cheaper in NYC. CHinese food as well. Lots of cheap restaurants for under $10 in NYC.
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Old 09-22-2011, 02:18 AM
 
4,794 posts, read 12,331,654 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SophieLL View Post
Yeah, but, then again, those comparison are translating pesos to dollars, wich makes BA cheap ONLY for foreingers. I mean the cost of living as if i earn 3000 pesos a month here and can, lets say, go to the movies only one time per month cause thats all i can do with that money, and if i go to New York, and earn 3000 dollars there, i can go to the movies maybe 3 or 4 times.

That same article says it:
For example, to keep the same standard of living that would require $3,000 in New York City you would need to make just about $1,291 (ARS $5,428) in Buenos Aires.

So, basically, to keep the standar of living i would have in new York earning 3000 dollars, i have to earn 5,500 pesos here!! Wich makes BA much more expensive than NY, for people that lives here.
Isnt that insane? And NY is the most expensive city in USA


Anyways, my point is, USA is very cheap.
How much does it cost to go dinner there?

Im thinking if i go there and earn 3000 dollars, i will live SO much better than if i i earn 3000 pesos here.
I think I know what you mean. Translating currency like dollar/pesos can be very confusing beyond just the basic amount you get from switching money at the bank. It is also about how much most people in the middle class can reasonably afford.
I live near Seattle and in this city $1200 can get you a decent one bedroom apartment in many areas.
I do believe food is cheaper for most people in the US to afford than many other places in the world. One reason is US agriculture is very efficient. We actually pay our farmers NOT to grow crops on part of their land so to keep the prices up enough for them to earn a living. We have so much excess farmland that we can easily feed our population and still export a lot of food to other countries so food is cheap here.
Movie ticket prices have gone up in recent years but are still around $10, or about $7 for an afternoon matinee.
I believe the average hourly wage in the US is around $23/hour so a movie with popcorn and a drink costs a little less than hour's worth of work.
A meal at McDonald's is around $7 and would cost about 20 minutes worth of work to the average American. Eating at a nice restaurant might be more like $15 to $25 dollars, or about an hour's worth of work. Eating at an expensive restaurant might be $50 or so and about 2 hours worth of work.

Last edited by kanhawk; 09-22-2011 at 02:29 AM..
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Old 09-22-2011, 02:28 AM
 
Location: Belgium
1,164 posts, read 1,965,214 times
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What I do know for a fact is that in Europe, gasoline is horrendously expensive compared to the United States. In Belgium, we pay 1.6 euro/liter gasoline, which roughly translates to about 2.1 dollars/US liquid quart. I know in countries like France, Germany, Italy, it's a bit less, but not all that much.
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Old 09-22-2011, 02:35 AM
 
Location: Tricity, PL
61,216 posts, read 86,083,221 times
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Quote:
I believe the average hourly wage in the US is around $23/hour so a movie with popcorn and a drink costs a little less than hour's worth of work.
According to fxTrade US average hourly earnings in August 2011 was $19.50, so that minus taxes is about $2500 a month ( for a single )
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Old 09-22-2011, 08:20 AM
 
6,462 posts, read 8,130,970 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elnina View Post
Here are average sale prices by number of bedrooms for May 2010:

Chicago studio average price = $117,000
Chicago 1 bedroom condo average price = $215,000
Chicago 2 bedroom condo average price = $300,000
Chicago 3 bedroom condo & townhouse average price = $489,000
Chicago 4+ bedroom condo & townhouse average price = $544,000

For Sale Pricing Statistics
Median New York, NY For Sale Price: $439,000
Studio For Sale Median Price: $355,000
1 Bedroom For Sale Median Price: $235,000
2 Bedroom For Sale Median Price: $340,000
3 Bedroom For Sale Median Price: $439,000
4 Bedroom For Sale Median Price: $538,000
It is actually pretty cheap in Chicago. A studio flat (35 m²) in central Oslo costs around $290,000. In the most fancy area the price is over $340,000.
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Old 09-22-2011, 09:08 AM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
27,296 posts, read 28,371,143 times
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These kinds of comparisons are often difficult to make because socio-economic status levels are not the same for different countries.
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Old 09-22-2011, 09:12 AM
 
1,734 posts, read 1,816,555 times
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Housing prices are hard to compare because they are so influenced by geography and history. Some European towns have town centers that are many hundreds of years old, and lovingly preserved. The 1600s were not big on huge apartments.

Other places, like the UK -simply don't have a lot of room, driving up prices.

In places that do have room, like Scandinavia, it is often very location-dependent. An apartment in the best parts of Oslo is equivalent to one in Manhattan in the USA.

Also compare the prices in Vardø with the more unpopular parts of the USA.
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Old 09-22-2011, 09:36 AM
 
Location: Macao
16,265 posts, read 43,000,763 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
These kinds of comparisons are often difficult to make because socio-economic status levels are not the same for different countries.
True.

An example.

I had a tour guide trekking in Nepal. A local Nepalese guy. He had equivalent to a 6th grade education, was about 19 years old, but seriously making bank with his English skills and guiding tourists in the Himilayas. He had all the latest electronics, on and on.

He continually told me his dream to live in the U.S., and his unrealistic images of having nice cars, beautiful girls, etc.

In my mind, I was thinking he already had the highest status income relative to education right where he was at....

On the flip side....when I lived in NYC, I'd meet these guys from Nepal, Philippines, etc. Most often they are living with 15 other people in some 2-3 bedroom apartment....trying to save everything they can, so they can get back home!

They realize that living in some American ghetto trying to pay $1,000/month on rent while working as a cashier at minimum wage job...is just a much lower quality of life than tour guide to relatively wealthy foreigners in Nepal would be.
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Old 09-22-2011, 10:24 AM
 
5,463 posts, read 9,599,493 times
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I have no idea what it's like cost-wise to live in BA, but I think it's fair to say a good number of things in the US keep increasing in price. Medical expenses in the US are expensive unless you have health insurance. But then the expense to buy health insurance isn't exactly cheap.

Living costs can vary depending on where you want to live. Housing expenses in large cities like LA, New York City, etc., are going to be more expensive than smaller cities and towns. If you have to pay for utilities, that's going to add on to the overall housing expense. Don't forget too, that the cost of transportation adds up. LA is more spread out, so the expense is due to people having their own cars to get around. Not much mass transit there. In NYC, getting around is often by mass transit, subways, taxis, buses. San Francisco has a pretty good system of buses and the BART line. Many states add a sales tax to goods and products you buy.

There are plenty of places around the US where you can get by okay on a budget of $3000/month. But, again, it just depends on where you want to live. It'd be hard to do in many large cities around the US. In smaller cities and towns, it's quite doable. The Pacific Northwest tends to be easier on the wallet and can be a pleasant area to live.
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Old 09-22-2011, 10:39 AM
 
Location: the dairyland
1,222 posts, read 2,270,021 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SophieLL View Post

Anyway, can an American tell me how the cost of living is there?
and how is it compared to european countries?
I have a feeling than USA is very cheap, then it comes BA (expensive) and Europe wich is more expensive. But maybe im wrong and Europe is unexpensive too
European here.. lived in Germany and the US. Compared to Germany, the following things are cheaper in the US, no idea where Buenos Aires ranks though:

- beef
- gas
- theater tickets, depending on what time of the day
- property outside of the big cities
- coffee
- cars
- clothes, a LOT cheaper
- electricity

The following things were noticably cheaper in Germany:

- rent for apartments (outside of Munich, Hamburg, Frankfurt, Düsseldorf, etc)
- all the food not mentioned above
- cell phone contracts
- stuff like soap, shower gels, deodorants
- college tuition
- text books
- health insurance
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