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Old 09-22-2011, 02:18 PM
 
Location: Paris, France
321 posts, read 959,185 times
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Different countries have different aspirations, so it is extremely difficult to compare. When I grew up in the U.S., the textbooks in school were full of things like "Americans work 15 hours to earn enough money to buy a refrigerator but in Poland they work 278 hours to buy one." (The numbers are made up of course, but you get the picture.) No mention was ever made about whether the "other" country even wanted the product in question and there were never any comparisons unfavorable to the American way of life, such as "a stomach operation is free in Cuba but you have to work 400 hours to pay for one in the United States."

Since there are thousands of variables, is it really possible to compare? If somebody tells you, "cars cost half as much in the United States but people live 10 years longer in Spain," which item sounds better?
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Old 09-22-2011, 05:14 PM
 
Location: Tricity, PL
61,438 posts, read 86,549,810 times
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^^^ talking about how many working hours to buy this or that. Americans work more than most people in developed countries. Their vacation time is short, few paid holidays and not much time for families. Work.. work.. work to buy... buy... and buy more. Needed or not! "Because I deserve it" , "because I worked for it" or whatever reason. Big cars, huge McMansions and overspending is not necessary a dream way to live for people in other countries.
Hard to believe? Well, its true!
Rest, quality time with family and friends, more holidays, longer vacations even if that means less work and less money, but healthier lifestyle - that's what many others are looking for. A trip on the bike, a walk in the park... not eating fast food in a oversized SUV, and long hours at work in order to be able to pay for all that stuff no one really has time to enjoy. In other countries people are content with less, spending less and trying to manage money wisely.
So, "expensive" is a pretty relative term.

Last edited by elnina; 09-22-2011 at 06:55 PM..
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Old 09-22-2011, 08:54 PM
 
Location: Duluth, Minnesota, USA
7,641 posts, read 18,088,336 times
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It depends:

Food: Apparently Americans spend the smallest percentage of their income on food of any nation, or any nation in the OECD. Dairy and meat seem particularly cheap.

Restaurants: Cheaper than (Western) Europe, more expensive than Mexico. A good (albeit not fancy), large restaurant meal (Europeans are astonished by our portions) for roughly $15 - $20, except if you get steak or lobster or something like that, so Americans eat out much more often than Europeans, who eat out mostly on special occasions (as Americans used to and are apparently returning to doing with the economy in the trenches). A fancy restaurant meal with wine costs ranges from $40 upwards to above $500, depending on the prestige of the place, what you order, and the city in question.

Transportation: A car is essential to the lives of most Americans...we simply (most of us) live too far apart from each other for public transportation to be a feasible option. It's not the price of the car that'll get you (a new car costs between $20,000 and $40,000, and are generally much, much more luxurious and larger than anything sold abroad at that price), but it's the fact that you will, in most places, need a car for every adult in your household. Gas is far cheaper than in any developed country outside of the Middle East, even with the recent hikes in gas prices - but this is counterbalanced by the sheer amount of driving most Americans do.

Electronics: I've compared, at various times, the prices of electronics in many world countries, and the U.S. almost always comes out cheapest. I've never seen them for China, though. Considering that we have one of the highest incomes in the world, the relative cost for us is even lower.

Housing: This very much depends on where you live. Most Americans live in the suburbs, and a typical American family lives in a more spacious and luxurious home than any of their counterparts save Australians. This comes at the expense of having a "walkable community"; however, if asked, most Americans would probably prefer to live in the 2000 sf or 3000 sf (about 200 m2 or 300 m2) house with the two- or three-car garage on a land than have bars and restaurants (which they could just as well drive to) nearby.

More later...
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Old 09-22-2011, 08:54 PM
 
Location: Macao
16,265 posts, read 43,086,628 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SophieLL View Post
Then again, education here is free.

And with education i mean not only high school and primary school. I mean University education. The most prestigious University (College) here , UBA (University of Buenos Aires) is free.

So i guess we make up the high prices in other things with that. I know a lot of latinamerican (specially colombians) that came here to study cause University there costs a lot! And here is free (and a good university, too, one of the top of latinamericans).
I know in USA, college is expensive.
Education in the U.S. puts most people into serious, serious debt. Plus, in American society, the Bachelors Degree is essentially what a High School degree was 25 years ago. You absolutely MUST get a BA degree, or you're job options are just so much more limited.

But to get a college degree, it takes a good 10-15 years to slowly pay it off.
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Old 09-22-2011, 11:46 PM
 
Location: Paris, France
321 posts, read 959,185 times
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It costs 280€ to go to university in France; that's just the tuition fee, of course.
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Old 09-22-2011, 11:54 PM
 
9,327 posts, read 21,981,978 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
The problem with $3,000 in New York City...and in US Dollars...is the cost of rent. If you want your own little studio apartment, you are probably looking at $1,500-2,000 a month, unless you want to live in a very poor violent crime-infested area and it might be cheaper. Take in mind your studio apartment is just four walls, no bedroom or anything. Just a little room. That's typical in NYC.

So, yeah, you could make it in NYC. I highly doubt you'd be going to many fancy restaurants, but Mcdonalds is a bit cheaper in NYC. CHinese food as well. Lots of cheap restaurants for under $10 in NYC.
Actually a studio apartment in a transitional area just west of hells kitchen rents for 2,300. thats what my friend is paying.. and they just reduced his rent to keep him from moving!
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Old 09-22-2011, 11:58 PM
 
9,327 posts, read 21,981,978 times
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5 pesos = 1.19 USD. You can buy 1 candy bar and maybe have 50 cents left, depending on which candy bar you buy.

4.99USD = 21.00 Pesos. I've had good meals in BA for that 21 pesos.

For lunch today I had Salvadorian food. 3 tacos with mole sauce. Soda. Total price was 11.00 including tax. Thats 46 pesos. I've eaten for less than that in BA!

25 pesos = 6.00 dollars which can get you 1 soda, papas (French fries) and a burger.

I've never seen a small pizza for 6.00 dollars. I bought 2 slices at fancier pizza place and it cost me 7.00 dollars for 2 slices (pirasos).

Quote:
Originally Posted by SophieLL View Post
4.99 for 2 pizzas????

Here with 5 pesos you can only buy a cheap candy bar in the supermarket.

1 pizza in a cheap place will cost $25.


But reading through the data you posted i see appartments to buy are MUCH more expensive there. So, that is a relief, at least BA is not more expensive in everything.

A cousin of mine just bought a one bedroom appartment 50m2 with a balcnony in a 11th floor with a view of all the city, and amenities like a swimming pool, laundry, in a very nice neighbourhood for $96.000-
It is expensive compared to the rest of Argentina (with that money you can buy 2 stores mansions in some cities) but unexpensive compared to USA.


Of course, we dont earn in dollars
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Old 09-23-2011, 12:04 AM
 
9,327 posts, read 21,981,978 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
Education in the U.S. puts most people into serious, serious debt. Plus, in American society, the Bachelors Degree is essentially what a High School degree was 25 years ago. You absolutely MUST get a BA degree, or you're job options are just so much more limited.

But to get a college degree, it takes a good 10-15 years to slowly pay it off.
It depends on where you went to college. If you were a state resident of California and went to a California State University campus it won't take that long. If you went Ivy, possibly so.
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Old 09-23-2011, 12:23 AM
 
Location: Macao
16,265 posts, read 43,086,628 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by minibrings View Post
Actually a studio apartment in a transitional area just west of hells kitchen rents for 2,300. thats what my friend is paying.. and they just reduced his rent to keep him from moving!
Damn, that's going up even more! Actually it was about 10 years ago since I was last living in NYC.

Makes sense it would be even a lot more now.
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Old 09-23-2011, 12:26 AM
 
Location: Macao
16,265 posts, read 43,086,628 times
Reputation: 10231
Quote:
Originally Posted by minibrings View Post
It depends on where you went to college. If you were a state resident of California and went to a California State University campus it won't take that long. If you went Ivy, possibly so.
California has the very cheapest college tuition in the country for in-state students.

Actually, that's one of the reasons I once moved there, and even to this day, I still have California residency....

But, it's university school system is the exception rather than the norm for low costs for public state universities.
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