Welcome to City-Data.com Forum!
2,500,000 members. Thank you!
U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > World
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 10-11-2011, 07:34 PM
 
Location: Leeds, UK
22,139 posts, read 29,397,666 times
Reputation: 8819

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by theunbrainwashed View Post
Cost of living Australia?? Houses in Australia are like, five times more expensive than in the average Canadian city. The only thing Australia has over Canada is the weather, for the most part.
Really? I always thought Australia was very cheap compared to Canada. Anyway I'd pick Canada over Australia without even thinking about it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-11-2011, 07:51 PM
 
Location: Sunshine Coast, BC
10,781 posts, read 8,684,077 times
Reputation: 17780
Quote:
Originally Posted by dunno what to put here View Post
Really? I always thought Australia was very cheap compared to Canada. Anyway I'd pick Canada over Australia without even thinking about it.
No, absolutely not. The cost of living in Oz has gone through the roof in the past several years.

Every capital city here has severely unaffordable real estate and even many of the smaller cities. Canada has a few of these unaffordable real estate markets but you have the choice of other cities with more reasonable housing.

The minimum wage is high here so that has a snowball effect on the cost of most things. Some things will be a bit cheaper, like booze and car insurance, but most things cost more.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-11-2011, 07:52 PM
 
Location: Brisbane
5,020 posts, read 7,406,997 times
Reputation: 4466
Quote:
Originally Posted by dunno what to put here View Post
Really? I always thought Australia was very cheap compared to Canada. Anyway I'd pick Canada over Australia without even thinking about it.
Ha Ha obviously you have not being to Australain for at least the last 10 years?.

Last edited by danielsa1775; 10-11-2011 at 08:06 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-11-2011, 08:03 PM
 
Location: Sunshine Coast, BC
10,781 posts, read 8,684,077 times
Reputation: 17780
Having experienced both countries, I prefer Canada.

But then opinions on the two countries will depend on the individual - their personality, lifestyle preferences, where they're at in their career/stage of life, etc.

Also, both countries are big and have huge differences within themselves, depending on where you live. The experience of living in Perth will be very different to that of Melbourne. Same for living in Montreal versus Victoria. Same for big city vs. small city/big town experiences.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-11-2011, 08:17 PM
 
Location: Leeds, UK
22,139 posts, read 29,397,666 times
Reputation: 8819
I've never been to Australia or had experience in the Australian estate market..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-11-2011, 08:40 PM
 
25,040 posts, read 27,747,392 times
Reputation: 11784
Quote:
Originally Posted by dunno what to put here View Post
I've never been to Australia or had experience in the Australian estate market..
From what I hear, the real estate for Australian capital cities and their suburbs and satellites is comparable to the values of a detached house in southeast England
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-11-2011, 09:36 PM
 
Location: The Present
2,006 posts, read 4,286,208 times
Reputation: 1987
I'm curious, whats urban living like in Australia?

I have yet to visit, but I've read plenty of good things about Sydney and Melbourne. Although one thing people often tell me is that the infrastructure for public transportation is lacking, if that's so doesn't Melbourne have one of the biggest (if not the largest) tram system in the world?

I'm also curious as to what the differences are say between living in Perth as compared to Sydney or Canberra.

Would the standard of living/QOL say be comparable to Auckland or Wellington in NZ?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-11-2011, 09:54 PM
 
Location: Leeds, UK
22,139 posts, read 29,397,666 times
Reputation: 8819
Quote:
Originally Posted by theunbrainwashed View Post
From what I hear, the real estate for Australian capital cities and their suburbs and satellites is comparable to the values of a detached house in southeast England
Wow.. I had no idea Australia as that expensive.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-11-2011, 10:30 PM
 
Location: Brisbane
5,020 posts, read 7,406,997 times
Reputation: 4466
Quote:
Originally Posted by dunno what to put here View Post
Wow.. I had no idea Australia as that expensive.
Being reserching the realestate prices a lot lately, as we are looking to buy. For a Detached house Sydney median is about $650,000 dollars, Melbourne about $550,000 Canberra Perth and Darwin $500k and Brisbane $450K

$1 Australian = $1 US.

Last edited by danielsa1775; 10-11-2011 at 10:41 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-11-2011, 10:57 PM
 
Location: Sunshine Coast, BC
10,781 posts, read 8,684,077 times
Reputation: 17780
Quote:
Originally Posted by wordlife View Post
I'm curious, whats urban living like in Australia?
Depends on which city. Sydney, Melbourne better for urban living than Perth which is mainly suburbia and has only small pockets of interesting and lively urban areas. Perth's very change-phobic so it takes a while for anything progressive and interesting to happen that goes against the suburban mentality.

Quote:
Originally Posted by wordlife View Post
I have yet to visit, but I've read plenty of good things about Sydney and Melbourne. Although one thing people often tell me is that the infrastructure for public transportation is lacking, if that's so doesn't Melbourne have one of the biggest (if not the largest) tram system in the world?
Public transport in Sydney and Melbourne might be considered lacking only because it can't keep up with the population and the expansion of the cities. I was in Melbourne regularly for work, days and sometimes weeks at a time and I found the public transport excellent. But then I was lucky in that work paid for a nice apartment in the inner suburbs. Hopping on and off trams was easy and convenient. And it was a great walking city with interesting precincts and street life. People I worked with, who lived in far flung suburbs, were not as thrilled with the public transport system.

Quote:
Originally Posted by wordlife View Post
I'm also curious as to what the differences are say between living in Perth as compared to Sydney or Canberra
When looking at the OP's criteria: Perth's location is a big fat minus. It's very isolated, and not just in a physical sense. Not so great on nightlife, tourist attractions, economic diversity, cultural contribution, urban living, architecture, cost of living.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > World
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2024, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top