Welcome to City-Data.com Forum!
U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > World
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-06-2014, 01:37 AM
 
Location: Phoenix
1,110 posts, read 1,379,685 times
Reputation: 902

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Davy-040 View Post
Maybe the Latin Americans might call him Ringo the Gringo other than that i don't see any problems, especially Rocco (popular name for male pornstars) is a pretty cool name.
Popular name for pornstar?? Serious? Thanks though!

I'm glad to hear other opinion here:

My family will be moving to the US soon, we are from the Philippines. My son's name are RINGO and ROCCO. I heard that these names are used for pet in the US haha!

You think I should be worried about it? Will they be bashed by kids and people there?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-06-2014, 07:49 AM
 
5,390 posts, read 9,693,411 times
Reputation: 9994
I love it when Asians come to the US and adopt an English name... So "Xue Quing Zheng" will be called "Tina".. or "melissa".
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-06-2014, 07:54 AM
 
12,030 posts, read 9,342,394 times
Reputation: 2848
Quote:
Originally Posted by burgler09 View Post
I teach ESL , and I see a lot of people with the name David and Daniel
Those are Spanish names as well. They are pronounced differently, but the spelling is the same.

Many names are international such as Patricia, Hilda, Laura, Julia, Julian, María, etc
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-06-2014, 08:07 AM
 
Location: Finland
24,128 posts, read 24,808,159 times
Reputation: 11103
English, or international names are much more common with girls for some reason.

Maria, Sofia, Emilia, Olivia, Amanda, Matilda, Johanna, Julia


Those are among the most popular in Finland the past five years. Maria has been the most common name given to girls since the late 70's.

Matias, Mikael, Kristian

Boys have much more frequently Finnish names.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-06-2014, 08:30 AM
 
Location: Taipei
8,864 posts, read 8,446,442 times
Reputation: 7414
It's very popular in Asia as nicknames.
I tried to get rid of my English nickname,then I realized that no foreigner could pronounce my Mandarin name rightfully and they all look pretty painful whenever they try to call me,so I had to stick with my English nickname when I'm abroad or stuff.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-10-2014, 06:28 PM
 
Location: Bretagne, FRANCE
192 posts, read 270,100 times
Reputation: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
It is the same in Quebec: names that even remotely sound like they were inspired by American soap operas are considered to be lower-class by a lot of people.

The kids of the wealthier more educated classes in Quebec tend to have more classic, (usually French-sounding) given names, with current popular ones being stuff like Chloé, Camille, Noémie, Rosalie, Juliette, Olivier, Guillaume, Maxime, Antoine, etc.
~ big sigh ~
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-10-2014, 06:32 PM
 
3,282 posts, read 3,793,911 times
Reputation: 2971
Quote:
Originally Posted by ben86 View Post
Those are surnames in the English-speaking world, is there any reason why they have been adopted as Brazilian first names?
I have always been perplexed by the popularity of English surnames as first names in Brazil. And they are VERY popular. My father in laws name is Gladstone and brother in law Emerson.

I've noticed these types of names are also popular in Central America and Colombia.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-11-2014, 06:58 AM
 
Location: Fortaleza, Northeast of Brazil
3,989 posts, read 6,793,025 times
Reputation: 2470
Quote:
Originally Posted by rosa surf View Post
I have always been perplexed by the popularity of English surnames as first names in Brazil. And they are VERY popular. My father in laws name is Gladstone and brother in law Emerson.

I've noticed these types of names are also popular in Central America and Colombia.

Very popular indeed.

Parents just have no idea those names are actually surnames.

I think it's because in the USA and UK it's usual that people are known by their surnames, but that's not usual in Brazil.

If president John F. Kennedy is often presented as "president Kennedy", many Brazilians will assume Kennedy is his first name. No wonder there are many people in Brazil called Kennedy (first name).

I believe there are already some kids in Brazil with first name Obama.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-11-2014, 07:18 AM
 
Location: USA
626 posts, read 1,240,839 times
Reputation: 503
Quote:
Originally Posted by MalaMan View Post
You saw nothing!!

There are some kids from poor families whose names are LITERALLY Uoshinton.

The name is written that way!!!

THAT is misspelling!!!!!



And there is even another version: Uoshinto, without the "n" in the end!!!!!

I have also seen it spelled in spanish "Guasinton" (Washington).
Other names that are spelled different using spanish grammar are:

Yanet = Janet
Yeni = Jenny
Yina = Gina
Yulian = Julian

Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-11-2014, 07:30 AM
 
Location: Eindhoven, Netherlands
10,646 posts, read 16,032,303 times
Reputation: 5286
Quote:
Originally Posted by MalaMan View Post
Very popular indeed.

Parents just have no idea those names are actually surnames.

I think it's because in the USA and UK it's usual that people are known by their surnames, but that's not usual in Brazil.

If president John F. Kennedy is often presented as "president Kennedy", many Brazilians will assume Kennedy is his first name. No wonder there are many people in Brazil called Kennedy (first name).

I believe there are already some kids in Brazil with first name Obama.
Did they do the same thing with Adams, Madison, Monroe, Van Buren, Polk, Fillmore, Buchanan, Hayes, Garfield, Cleveland, McKinley, Taft, Harding, Coolidge, Hoover, Roosevelt, Truman, Eisenhower, Nixon, Ford, Reagan and Bush?

They probably did with Tyler, Taylor, Pierce, Lincoln, Grant, Arthur, Harrison, Wilson, Johnson, Carter and Clinton.

Washington, Jefferson, Jackson and Kennedy are names that are used for sure.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > World

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2024, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top