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Old 12-22-2011, 12:28 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
26,883 posts, read 38,101,661 times
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In France:

For boys:

Dylan
Jordan
Evan
Ethan
Jackie/Jacky (older)

For girls:

Emma
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Old 12-22-2011, 12:33 PM
 
4,361 posts, read 7,089,810 times
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I heard that many German babies were named "Kevin" soon after the actor Kevin Costner starred in the movie "Dances With Wolves" 20 years ago.

I've noticed that many African men, and sometimes Chinese-American men, have first names that are normally English last names. Like Hastings Banda the President of Malawi. And Nelson Mandela the President of South Africa.

Last edited by slowlane3; 12-22-2011 at 12:49 PM..
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Old 12-22-2011, 12:35 PM
 
Location: Fortaleza, Northeast of Brazil
4,001 posts, read 6,820,274 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ben86 View Post
Those are surnames in the English-speaking world, is there any reason why they have been adopted as Brazilian first names?
Because people don't know that they are surnames!

80% of people who put those names in their kids can't understand a single word in English!

And also there is the "copy" factor. Since some kids are called "Anderson", other kids will also be named "Anderson" because their parents want to copy the name of the other kids.
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Old 12-22-2011, 12:37 PM
 
Location: Viña del Mar, Chile
16,391 posts, read 30,963,732 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MalaMan View Post
Because people don't know that they are surnames!

80% of people who put those names in their kids can't understand a single word in English!

And also there is the "copy" factor. Since some kids are called "Anderson", other kids will also be named "Anderson" because their parents want to copy the name of the other kids.
I have a friend in Colombia whose name is Anderson haha
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Old 12-22-2011, 12:37 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
26,883 posts, read 38,101,661 times
Reputation: 11652
Quote:
Originally Posted by slowlane3 View Post
I heard that many German babies were named "Kevin" soon after the actor Kevin Costner starred in the movie "Dances With Wolves" 20 years ago.

I've noticed that many African men, and sometimes Chinese-American men, have first names that are normally English last names. Like Hastings Banda the President of Malawi.
Haitians also do this to some degree. Plus, a lot of their family names are actually French first names! So many of them have names like Rolson Jean-Baptiste or Evans Calixte!
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Old 12-22-2011, 12:43 PM
 
Location: Fortaleza, Northeast of Brazil
4,001 posts, read 6,820,274 times
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Some biblical names have identical forms in almost all of the European languages.

"Daniel" for example. It's writen the same way in English, in Spanish, in Portuguese, in Italian...


The case of "David" is interesting... In Portuguese, it uses to be writen "Davi", and it's pronounced with the emphasis in the final syllable (da-VI).

Since the American movies started to become successful in Brazil, a lot of "Davids" started to appear in Brazil, and their names are pronounced like in English.

But to bring more confusion, some parents now have named their kids as "David", with "d" in the end, but want that everyone pronounce it as "Davi" (da-VI). It's funny!
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Old 12-22-2011, 12:52 PM
 
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Does Joao have a different meaning that Jose ? I've noticed that some Brasilians are named Jose, although Joao seems more common there.
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Old 12-22-2011, 12:54 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
26,883 posts, read 38,101,661 times
Reputation: 11652
Quote:
Originally Posted by MalaMan View Post
Some biblical names have identical forms in almost all of the European languages.

"Daniel" for example. It's writen the same way in English, in Spanish, in Portuguese, in Italian...


The case of "David" is interesting... In Portuguese, it uses to be writen "Davi", and it's pronounced with the emphasis in the final syllable (da-VI).

Since the American movies started to become successful in Brazil, a lot of "Davids" started to appear in Brazil, and their names are pronounced like in English.

But to bring more confusion, some parents now have named their kids as "David", with "d" in the end, but want that everyone pronounce it as "Davi" (da-VI). It's funny!
Daniel is actually Daniele in Italian (written Daniel exactly like the others in French though), but your point is still accurate.

David is written the same way in many languages as far as I know - English, French, Spanish, German (though I did not know about Davi in Portuguese), but in Italian it is Davide.
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Old 12-22-2011, 01:34 PM
 
6,469 posts, read 8,203,529 times
Reputation: 5520
Top 10 names - Norway 2010:

1. Emma og Lucas/Lukas
2. Linnea/Linea og Emil
3. Sara/Sahra/Sarah og Mathias/Matias
4. Sofie/Sophie og William
5. Nora/Norah og Magnus
6. Ingrid/Ingerid/Ingri og Markus/Marcus
7. Thea/Tea og Jonas
8. Emilie og Kristian/Christian
9. Ida og Oliver
10. Maja/Maia/Maya og Alexander/Aleksander

At least Ingrid is a Norse female name.
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Old 12-22-2011, 01:37 PM
 
Location: Fortaleza, Northeast of Brazil
4,001 posts, read 6,820,274 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slowlane3 View Post
Does Joao have a different meaning that Jose ? I've noticed that some Brasilians are named Jose, although Joao seems more common there.

Joao is John (the one who baptized Jesus Christ).

Jose is Joseph (the husband of the Virgin Mary, the mother of Jesus).
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