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Old 12-22-2011, 07:49 PM
 
497 posts, read 983,919 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by burgler09 View Post
I teach ESL , and I see a lot of people with the name David and Daniel
Those were the two names I immediately thought of when I opened this thread.
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Old 12-22-2011, 08:34 PM
 
1,264 posts, read 3,862,276 times
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Quote:
How popular are English first names in non-English speaking countries?
When people convert to Christianity, they usually choose a christian name for the baptism.
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Old 12-22-2011, 09:36 PM
 
Location: Østenfor sol og vestenfor måne
17,916 posts, read 24,365,762 times
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Most of the most popular 'English' names are not English in origin but anglicized Hebrew names. This is true in most countries with a Christian legacy.

So it may be more apt to ask how popular Hebrew names are in non-English speaking countries.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cmptrwlt View Post
Top 10 names - Norway 2010:

1. Emma og Lucas/Lukas
2. Linnea/Linea og Emil
3. Sara/Sahra/Sarah og Mathias/Matias
4. Sofie/Sophie og William
5. Nora/Norah og Magnus
6. Ingrid/Ingerid/Ingri og Markus/Marcus
7. Thea/Tea og Jonas
8. Emilie og Kristian/Christian
9. Ida og Oliver
10. Maja/Maia/Maya og Alexander/Aleksander

At least Ingrid is a Norse female name.
I regret the lack of popularity of Norse names. Most of my family have them and I like them. Much nicer than the 'boring' and overused Hebrew names.

About number 10, Maja/Maja. This is a fairly new one in America also and I cannot figure out what it comes from. What is it about a baby girl that evokes a Mexican indigenous tribe or the Sanskrit word for 'illusion'?

Last edited by ABQConvict; 12-22-2011 at 09:52 PM..
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Old 12-22-2011, 09:46 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,544 posts, read 56,076,059 times
Reputation: 11862
Yeah a lot of even very English sounding names of course have other origins, often Hebrew/Biblical. Very English English male names to me include:

William
Richard
Gordon
Percival
Lionel
Winston
Walter
Henry

You get the picture.

If you're talking such Anglophone names, of course many countries in Europe share names like David and John and it's variants. Peter and Paul are also common. Ricardo, Wilhelm, Jean.etc.

A lot of the former British colonies in Africa, like South Africa, East Africa, Nigeria. Some Singaporeans and Malaysians (mainly ethnic Chinese and Indians) also have 'English' first names. In places outside the Anglosphere or the Commonwealth some people have unofficial English names.

In Jamaica they often switch the first name and last name. I have a joke about an American named 'James Kennedy' and his Jamaican cousin 'Kennedy James' lol.
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Old 12-23-2011, 06:55 AM
 
Location: Fortaleza, Northeast of Brazil
3,992 posts, read 6,798,713 times
Reputation: 2470
You have to understand that many of the names with Hebrew/Biblical origins have different forms in each language.

For example, John is "John" in English, but in Portuguese it's "João", and in Spanish it's "Juan".

So, if I find someone with the name "John" in Brazil (instead of "João") it's 99% sure that the parents gave that name to the kid because they saw that name in an American movie, or because they wanted to honour John Lennon and the Beatles.

So, it should be considered an "English" name, even if it has Hebrew/Biblical origins. That Hebrew/Biblical name has a Portuguese version, that is "João".
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Old 12-23-2011, 06:59 AM
 
Location: Fortaleza, Northeast of Brazil
3,992 posts, read 6,798,713 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nesne View Post
I am going to defend all those Brazilians who have an Anglo surname as thier first name. I am American but my parents did the same thing only with a surname that is Danish, or Norwegian or both not sure. But at least they spelled it like it is normally spelled. There are many Brazilians with the name Washington spelling Uashington or something like that.

You saw nothing!!

There are some kids from poor families whose names are LITERALLY Uoshinton.

The name is written that way!!!

THAT is misspelling!!!!!



And there is even another version: Uoshinto, without the "n" in the end!!!!!
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Old 12-23-2011, 07:09 AM
 
2,226 posts, read 5,110,674 times
Reputation: 1028
Quote:
Originally Posted by MalaMan View Post
Is Priscilla (or Priscila) an English name?

I thought it was Russian!

There are MILLIONS of Priscilas in Brazil.
---

Roman
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Old 12-23-2011, 07:33 AM
 
Location: Fortaleza, Northeast of Brazil
3,992 posts, read 6,798,713 times
Reputation: 2470
There are many funny facts about first names in Brazil.

For example, the names that end with "-son".


"In the begining", there were the names with English origin, like Jefferson, Anderson, Robson, Clayson, Edson, Everson, Emerson and Gerson (I think this last one is German).

But, with time, the "creativity" of the Brazilian parents prevailed, and a lot of names ending with "-son" were invented, "inspired" by the English names like Jefferson, Anderson, Robson, Clayson, Everson, Emerson and Edson.


All the names bellow are inventions of the Brazilian parents from the 20th century, "inspired" by the English names:


- Adilson

- Glaydson

- Cleílson

- Cleudson

- Ronilson

- Romilson

- Genilson

- Leudson

- Marilson

- Jonilson

- and many others...


The "creativity" of the parents is endless.

With the exception of "Adilson" and a few others, most of those "invented" names are considered "nome de pobre" ("name of poor"), that is, are considered names for the "lower classes". Rich and upper middle class people would NEVER give those names to their kids!

If you ever find a Brazilian named "Marilson" or "Genilson" you can be 90% sure that, either he is poor, or his parents were poor at the time when he was born!
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Old 12-23-2011, 07:35 AM
 
Location: Fortaleza, Northeast of Brazil
3,992 posts, read 6,798,713 times
Reputation: 2470
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manolón View Post
---

Roman

Seriously? It's a Roman name?

I didn't know that...

I guess that name was popularized in Brazil after Priscila Presley, the wife of Elvis...

It's an extremely popular name of girls here...
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Old 12-23-2011, 07:43 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
26,883 posts, read 38,047,932 times
Reputation: 11651
Quote:
Originally Posted by MalaMan View Post
With the exception of "Adilson" and a few others, most of those "invented" names are considered "nome de pobre" ("name of poor"), that is, are considered names for the "lower classes". Rich and upper middle class people would NEVER give those names to their kids!

If you ever find a Brazilian named "Marilson" or "Genilson" you can be 90% sure that, either he is poor, or his parents were poor at the time when he was born!
It is the same in Quebec: names that even remotely sound like they were inspired by American soap operas are considered to be lower-class by a lot of people.

The kids of the wealthier more educated classes in Quebec tend to have more classic, (usually French-sounding) given names, with current popular ones being stuff like Chloé, Camille, Noémie, Rosalie, Juliette, Olivier, Guillaume, Maxime, Antoine, etc.
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