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Old 12-23-2011, 09:23 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
26,883 posts, read 38,159,184 times
Reputation: 11652

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
Lol, Irish Hispanics?

'I'd like a Guiness with my taco, please!'
Yeah, I have always loved the name Bernardo O'Higgins.

The Irish truly are everywhere.

Probably the greatest Québécois poet of them all was a guy named Émile... Nelligan.
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Old 12-23-2011, 10:35 PM
 
Location: Østenfor sol og vestenfor måne
17,916 posts, read 24,430,085 times
Reputation: 39038
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
Lol, Irish Hispanics?

'I'd like a Guiness with my taco, please!'
Irish Hispanics? Che Guevara, for one.
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Old 12-23-2011, 10:45 PM
 
1,482 posts, read 2,389,051 times
Reputation: 943
Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
Irish Hispanics? Che Guevara, for one.
Anthony Quinn
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Old 12-23-2011, 10:55 PM
 
Location: Liberal Coast
4,280 posts, read 6,098,137 times
Reputation: 3925
Quote:
Originally Posted by Antonio84 View Post
I once met a Hispanic guy that said his name was David.

When I called him dah-veeed (as it is pronounced in Spanish), he proceeded to correct me that the correct way was day-veed.

I spent a few minutes trying to make him understand that despite David being written the same in English and in Spanish, his name, considering he's a Hispanic, would correspond with the Spanish pronunciation and not the English, hence I was right and he was wrong. It was all in vain, he stuck to his ways.
He can pronounce his name however he wants to. Almost all of the Hispanic David's I know, don't go by the Spanish pronunciation.
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Old 12-24-2011, 02:20 AM
 
4,361 posts, read 7,099,294 times
Reputation: 5227
Many African-Americans fancy foreign (non-English) sounding first names - especially French origin
Demetrious, Andre, Maurice, Jacqueline, Yvonne, Gwendolyn, Marcellus, Alonzo (Lonnie), Lorenzo, LeRoy, Antoine (Antwan), Jamal
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Old 12-24-2011, 02:59 AM
 
230 posts, read 906,265 times
Reputation: 233
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
Lol, Irish Hispanics?

'I'd like a Guiness with my taco, please!'
When I lived in Mexico I dated a blond Mexican girl whose last name was Kennedy. I know she liked tacos, not sure about Guiness. I was afraid to ask as it is expensive there and I would have then had to buy a round of it.
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Old 12-26-2011, 10:07 AM
 
Location: Gone
1,011 posts, read 1,259,428 times
Reputation: 3589
We have some Ridges and Brookes, lol .
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Old 12-26-2011, 12:54 PM
 
13,496 posts, read 18,238,097 times
Reputation: 37885
Quote:
Originally Posted by MalaMan View Post
Some biblical names have identical forms in almost all of the European languages.

"Daniel" for example. It's writen the same way in English, in Spanish, in Portuguese, in Italian...


The case of "David" is interesting... In Portuguese, it uses to be writen "Davi", and it's pronounced with the emphasis in the final syllable (da-VI).

Since the American movies started to become successful in Brazil, a lot of "Davids" started to appear in Brazil, and their names are pronounced like in English.

But to bring more confusion, some parents now have named their kids as "David", with "d" in the end, but want that everyone pronounce it as "Davi" (da-VI). It's funny!
And my Portuguese bank manager's first name is Davide.
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Old 12-26-2011, 01:04 PM
 
13,496 posts, read 18,238,097 times
Reputation: 37885
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Yeah, I have always loved the name Bernardo O'Higgins.

The Irish truly are everywhere.

Probably the greatest Québécois poet of them all was a guy named Émile... Nelligan.
And Hugo Ricciardi O'Neill, the Portuguese nobleman who is head of the Clanaboy O'Neill clan. But we digress from first names.....
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Old 12-27-2011, 08:20 PM
 
1,482 posts, read 2,389,051 times
Reputation: 943
If i had another girl I would name her "Dokman". It is the name of the first queen of Korea and is written with these two characters 徳曼。meaning ethical or ethics and the second one is something like beautiful, virtuous. I think it's a great name.
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