U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > World
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 01-02-2012, 10:42 AM
 
702 posts, read 1,087,691 times
Reputation: 468

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by MalaMan View Post
I imagine that this thread may sound somewhat "strange" for Americans...
Americans have that 'big tent' approach to politics though, where people like David Duke and black leaders can both run for the Republican ticket and Republicans in liberal areas are more liberal than Democrats in Conservative areas!

There's probably more different opinions actually within the Republican and Democrat parties alone than there is in the whole UK parliament...
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-02-2012, 11:20 AM
 
Location: Yorkshire, England
5,599 posts, read 9,360,066 times
Reputation: 3095
We've got three main parties but Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland all have some of their own parties as well, plus there are a few minor parties which occasionally get a seat. Our electoral system is biased in favour of the bigger parties so that usually only one party forms a government, but last time round the Conservatives didn't get a clear majority so had to form a coalition with the Liberal Democrats. The 2010 election results were as follows:

Conservative - 307 seats
Labour - 258
Liberal Democrats - 57
Democratic Unionists - 8
Scottish National Party - 6
Sinn Fein - 5
Plaid Cymru - 3
Social Democratic and Labour Party - 3
Green - 1
Alliance Party - 1
Others - 1
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-02-2012, 03:24 PM
 
5,873 posts, read 6,865,531 times
Reputation: 4677
The Norwegian Parliament:

Coalition government (86/169 seats, 50.88%):
  • Norwegian Labour Party (centre-left) 64/169 seats
  • Socialist Left Party (left-wing) 11/169
  • Centre Party (centre/agrarian) 11/169
Opposition (83/169 seats, 49.12%):
  • Liberal Party (centre) 2/169 seats
  • Christian Democratic Party (centre) 10/169
  • Conservative Party (centre-right) 30/169
  • Progress Party (conservative liberal) 41/169
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-03-2012, 02:52 AM
 
1,810 posts, read 3,318,466 times
Reputation: 2015
Spain...

Government:
Partido Popular (PP, also UPN and PAR), Christian conservatism - 186 seats

Others:
Partido Socialista Obrero Español (PSOE), social democracy / social liberalism -110 seats
Convergència i Unió (CiU), Catalan center-right nationalism - 16
Izquierda Unida (IU, also two other parties: ICV -Catalan- and CHA -from Aragon-), left and environmentalists - 11
Amaiur, Basque left-wing independentism - 7
Partido Nacionalista Vasco (PNV), Basque Christian conservative nationalism - 5
Unión Progreso y Democracia (UPYD), social liberalism - 5
Esquerra Republicana de Catalunya (ERC) & Reagrupament (RI), Catalan social democratic independentism - 3
Bloque Nacionalista Galego (BNG), Galician leftist nationalism - 2
Coalición Canaria (CC), Canarian center-right nationalism - 2
Compromís (C-Q), Valencian leftist nationalism and environmentalism - 1
Foro de Ciudadanos, Asturian center-right regionalism - 1
Geroa Bai - Basque nationalism (from Nafarroa/Navarra) - 1
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-03-2012, 06:52 AM
 
Location: Fortaleza, Brazil
3,187 posts, read 5,378,239 times
Reputation: 1830
The composition of the Brazilian Chamber of Deputies (Camara dos Deputados):



Workers' Party (PT) - left wing, the party of president Dilma Rousseff - 86 deputies

Brazilian Democratic Movement Party (PMDB) - centrist, supports the government - 78 deputies

Party of the Brazilian Social Democracy (PSDB) - center-right, opposition to the government - 50 deputies

Social Democratic Party (PSD) - "independent" party, founded in 2011, it's neither opposition nor governist - 48 deputies

Progressive Party (PP) - center-right, supports the government (yeah, that's right, they are a right wing party, but support the left wing government - it's Brazil, people!) - 38 deputies

Party of the Republic (PR) - centrist, used to support the government, until a minister from the party was fired because of corruption, then became "independent" - 36 deputies

Brazilian Socialist Party (PSB) - left-wing, supports the government - 29 deputies

Democrats (DEM) - right-wing (may sound strange for Americans ), opposition to the government - 27 deputies

Democratic Labour Party (PDT) - left-wing, supports the government - 27 deputies

Brazilian Labour Party (PTB) - center-left, supports the government - 20 deputies

Social Christian Party (PSC) - ideology: nobody knows, supports the government - 17 deputies

Communist Party of Brazil (PCdoB) - left-wing, supports the government - 13 deputies

People's Socialist Party (PPS) - left-wing, opposition to the government (yeah, that's right ) - 11 deputies

Brazilian Republican Party (PRB) - ideology: no need for that, supports the government - 10 deputies

Green Party (PV) - "independent" - 10 deputies



There are 8 other minor parties, with a total of 13 deputies.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-03-2012, 06:57 AM
 
Location: Yorkshire, England
5,599 posts, read 9,360,066 times
Reputation: 3095
^^ Sounds REALLY complicated, particularly all those initials mostly beginning with P! Do these parties know how to cooperate with each other?
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-03-2012, 07:10 AM
 
Location: Fortaleza, Brazil
3,187 posts, read 5,378,239 times
Reputation: 1830
Quote:
Originally Posted by ben86 View Post
^^ Sounds REALLY complicated, particularly all those initials mostly beginning with P! Do these parties know how to cooperate with each other?

The letter "P" comes from the word "Partido" (Party).

Basically, some parties are supporters of the government, some parties are opposition to the government, and a few are "independent" (may support the government some times, and oppose it in other ocasions - some people say that some of those independent parties make decisions based on what the government has to "offer" to them )
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-03-2012, 07:18 AM
 
Location: Yorkshire, England
5,599 posts, read 9,360,066 times
Reputation: 3095
Quote:
Originally Posted by MalaMan View Post
The letter "P" comes from the word "Partido" (Party).

Basically, some parties are supporters of the government, some parties are opposition to the government, and a few are "independent" (may support the government some times, and oppose it in other ocasions - some people say that some of those independent parties make decisions based on what the government has to "offer" to them )
But does having all those different small parties together generally result in a functioning government which can get things done though? It probably wouldn't work here as our parties are not used to having to compromise as much, though the coalition we've had for the last two years has worked more smoothly than a lot of people predicted at first.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-03-2012, 07:27 AM
 
224 posts, read 623,522 times
Reputation: 157
Theres 8 in Denmark. But again its all due to proportional representation vs plurality voting system. I really find the PVS undemocratic in a way since alot of votes just go down the drain. You could have a 0.1% difference and still one get all the seats/mandates from that region/state. I really think votes should reflect the opinion of the country as a whole vs the opinion of the majority of people in regions added together....
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-03-2012, 07:45 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
24,952 posts, read 31,912,949 times
Reputation: 10239
The Canadian House of Commons was re-elected in May 2011 and its composition changed considerably.

Here is what it looks like now.

Total seats: 308

Conservatives (what their name suggests): 165 - absolute majority

New Democrats (cross-Canada social democratic/labour-type party): 102

Liberals (centrist, centre-right or centre-left depending on the mood, governing party for a majority of Canada's history): 34

Bloc Québécois (Quebec only separatist party, social democratic): 4

Green party (like elsewhere in the world): 1

Independent (former Conservative, now libertarian of some sort): 1


The Conservatives also form the majority in the Canadian Senate, which is the upper house and functions similarly to the British House of Lords. It is not really like the US Senate. The real power in Canada is in the House of Commons.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > World

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2021, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top