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View Poll Results: Is the inner city worse than the suburbs?
Yes, I associate "inner city" with negative image, which is seen as worse than "suburbs". 17 22.97%
Somewhat negative image of "inner city" compared to suburbs but not especially so. 13 17.57%
No, there is no difference, or no large positive/negative difference in image between "inner city" and "suburbs" to me. 13 17.57%
No, in fact I associate the "inner city" as actually having a positive image, more than the "suburbs". 31 41.89%
Voters: 74. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 04-03-2012, 01:37 PM
 
Location: Paris, France
2 posts, read 7,846 times
Reputation: 13

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I live in Paris and I disagree that the inner city Paris is richer than the suburbs, or that in general the suburbs (banlieue) are especially poor.
The richest town in Paris Area are in the suburbs, in the west suburb. Neuilly, Le vesinet, Louveciennes, Ville d'Avray are all more rich than the city of Paris.
If people look at statistics in every french city the rich live in the suburbs (and most of the poor too) the downtown is more average. It's the same for Lyon, Bordeaux, Marseille ....
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Old 04-04-2012, 04:49 AM
 
Location: Paris, France
327 posts, read 953,005 times
Reputation: 541
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Hmm, last time I checked the United States of America is part of the English-speaking world. Ever been to the southern Missisippi River valley? Appalachia? Inner city Detroit?
Point d'ancrage : la vie d'une famille rom - LeMonde.fr

Rue Rude: Shantytown on the way to the Paris airport

Does it get this bad in any of these places?
Attached Thumbnails
Where you live, do you think of "inner city" as worse/more undesirable than "suburbs"...-chapitre0-camp.jpg   Where you live, do you think of "inner city" as worse/more undesirable than "suburbs"...-side_3074788_5_apx_470_.jpg  
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Old 04-04-2012, 04:55 AM
 
Location: Paris, France
327 posts, read 953,005 times
Reputation: 541
Quote:
Originally Posted by Topaze View Post
I live in Paris and I disagree that the inner city Paris is richer than the suburbs, or that in general the suburbs (banlieue) are especially poor.
The richest town in Paris Area are in the suburbs, in the west suburb. Neuilly, Le vesinet, Louveciennes, Ville d'Avray are all more rich than the city of Paris.
If people look at statistics in every french city the rich live in the suburbs (and most of the poor too) the downtown is more average. It's the same for Lyon, Bordeaux, Marseille ....
The original question of the OP was about whether "inner city" is more or less undesirable than "suburb".

You cannot deny that generally, "banlieue" in French has the same connotations as "inner city" in American English: poverty, high crime, more than above average levels of immigration. Likewise, the term "centre ville" has none of the connotations of the "inner city".

If you read my post about Paris I am not however denying there are rich suburbs as well as poor ones. You are totally right that Neuilly etc are some of the richest places in France - but then again some of eastern/northern banlieues are some of the poorest.
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Old 04-04-2012, 07:12 AM
 
1,317 posts, read 2,381,902 times
Reputation: 1535
It is complicated, While inner Paris has a higher median income than the suburbs, it also has a higher poverty rate than the suburbs.
It means that what misses in inner Paris is not necessary the poor (who live in social housing mostly in NE of Paris) but the middle class family.
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Old 04-04-2012, 09:13 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
25,058 posts, read 32,199,586 times
Reputation: 10265
Quote:
Originally Posted by britinparis View Post
There are "tent cities" and "settlements" of homeless people in many cities across the U.S., people living in their cars, etc. It may look different to what you see in Europe but the living conditions are no less desperate.
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Old 04-04-2012, 10:29 AM
 
Location: West Coast of Europe
24,161 posts, read 21,947,879 times
Reputation: 9324
Yesterday I was in Lisbon again, there it all depends on whether or not you can afford a decent apartment or house. They are available both in the inner city and in the suburbs. But there are also lots of boxes throughout the entire metropolitan area.
So, I can't say that one is worse or less desirable than the other. Luckily we do not have that division typical of US cities, at least not yet.
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Old 05-21-2013, 12:51 AM
 
2,253 posts, read 3,229,703 times
Reputation: 987
In Toronto the inner city has become increasingly gentrified and desirable but also includes a lot of public housing and renters with modest incomes. Like Paris, it would have a higher average income than the metro area as a whole but a higher poverty rate as well. Many of the city's inner-ring suburbs have gotten poorer but the ones that were traditionally very wealthy have remained so.
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Old 05-21-2013, 04:08 AM
 
Location: North West Northern Ireland.
20,694 posts, read 21,819,008 times
Reputation: 3107
Yes our city houses are rubbish.
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Old 05-21-2013, 07:29 AM
 
Location: Washington, DC
4,043 posts, read 4,487,515 times
Reputation: 7171
This is a major trend in the States. We are finally taking value in our cities, and our best and brightest young people are moving in. Meanwhile our suburbs (especially the ones not close to successful major cities) are very generic and losing relevance. Only crap jobs remain and property values have plummeted.
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Old 05-21-2013, 08:18 AM
 
Location: Finland
24,257 posts, read 21,841,875 times
Reputation: 11103
The inner city apartments are always more expensive in any Finnish city. Generally, almost all poor people live in the suburbs. The more far you get from the centre, the cheaper the apartments are. Some parts of especially Helsinki downtown has become completely out of reach for even a middle class family.
In smaller cities, the differences are smaller, but still the downtowns are much more expensive.
In small cities, you might not even find apartments in suburbs, as there ain't any. Only detached houses. So then the poor people live in the centre, and richer people a bit far away from it.

But, there's a lot of different suburbs. Some are poor 60's or 70's concrete hells, other very lucrative villa areas where prices are high. Some suburbs are 50% concrete blocks filled with junkies, alcoholics and immigrants, the other half perfectly nice low-rises where families enjoy to live.

We don't have really bad areas. Two equal apartments can be totally differently priced as the other on is in a "undesirable" suburb. On the other hand, most of the crime happens in downtowns, as there's a lot of people, both living and visiting. Even the worst suburbs can be practically dead and pretty safe on a Friday night. Of course, police presence is higher in the centre, so...

The city planners are actively preventing ghettofication, and "higher class" houses and apartments are mixed in with the poorer areas, so an area will remain even somewhat lucrative to other than to alcoholics and unemployed. Also in some extent subsidised housing (for students or poorer people) are built right next to the downtown, so it doesn't become only a playground for the rich. This is working to some point, but sometimes just the name of the suburb can be enough for a family not to consider a move there. And most social problems are in the suburbs.
But still, I think this is a good thing. You don't need to live next to a junkie or unemployed immigrant, but you can meet them in the supermarket sometimes, and you don't get detached from the reality these people live.

So, I answered the "no difference" choice. There are good and bad suburbs, but you will not get cheap housing in a decent-sized city downtown.
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