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Old 05-07-2012, 07:15 AM
 
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Globalisation will run its course and likely be judged a failure. It failed early last century and can't see it prospering in this.
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Old 05-07-2012, 08:07 AM
 
Location: IL
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My view is that globalization will continue in some aspect or other forever. From a commerce prospective, business will continue to consolidate, but I believe there will always be some local flavor demanded of key products, that will allow smaller players to succeed in the face or large players. We are very connected today, and I believe we will only become more connected. When I think globalization, I view it as sharing across cultures, not just US or Europe to other countries.

People love borrowing ideas from others and generally want what others have, I can't imagine this stopping.

A lack of resources will create a difficult situation, and here my main concern is water. I believe this will be a source of wars in about 50 years...whatever that means for globalization.
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Old 05-07-2012, 09:10 AM
 
Location: Earth Wanderer, longing for the stars.
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Well, the concept that I was told is that countries that depend on each other for trade seldom make war on each other.

Is this true?

Japan has refused to import from China because of tainted food coming from China, but in the US that does not seem to be a major concern.

Is it that now that there are more of us, we are more expendable?

Yeah, now that corporations are hiring from other counties at slave wages it will tend to bring all wages down.

Our economic system depends on an ever expanding consumer base, which is probably one of the reasons why illegals are no longer such a big deal to the government, no matter which party is in power.

I think everything is about economics and yes, this will drive homogeneity, which, who knows, might turn out to be a good thing in the long run.
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Old 05-09-2012, 09:49 AM
 
Location: Illinois
565 posts, read 905,852 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goldengrain View Post
Well, the concept that I was told is that countries that depend on each other for trade seldom make war on each other.

Is this true?

Japan has refused to import from China because of tainted food coming from China, but in the US that does not seem to be a major concern.

Is it that now that there are more of us, we are more expendable?
I say this concept is probably true, America's relationship with China is a good example. Japan's centuries of hatred of China extend much further than our few decades of mistrust of them. China and Chinese businesses value American business significantly more and generally work pretty hard to keep these "dangerous quality" product cases to a minimum because of how extensively they depend on us for business.

I highly doubt it is because we are more expendable but rather drastic actions would implicate the economic health of the entire nation and world.
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Old 05-09-2012, 04:49 PM
 
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No, beneath the smiley faces and platitudes, people are bigoted and selfish. Globalization is the rage now becuase the movers and shakers benefit from it. As others have pointed out, if things go south in a big way for the average joe, he/she will be more than happy to give the finger to the global elite and start finding a way to blame 'Those funny lookin/talkin" people who are "not like us". Politicans of a similar mindset get elected in and the war machine revvs up. And domestically, we'll see all kinds of wonderful gems of bigotry rear their ugly heads that we thought we had "gotten over".

People with full stomachs have full hearts. People with empty stomachs have empty hearts. I forgot who told me that one, but it's true today, was true back when and will be true in the future. When things are peachy people ease up or at least play along to get along. Poo hits the fan and the truth comes out.
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Old 05-11-2012, 03:09 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,682 posts, read 50,761,789 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoness View Post
I say this concept is probably true, America's relationship with China is a good example. Japan's centuries of hatred of China extend much further than our few decades of mistrust of them. China and Chinese businesses value American business significantly more and generally work pretty hard to keep these "dangerous quality" product cases to a minimum because of how extensively they depend on us for business.

I highly doubt it is because we are more expendable but rather drastic actions would implicate the economic health of the entire nation and world.
If anyone should be hating anyone, it should be the Chinese towards the Japanese.
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Old 05-11-2012, 07:53 PM
 
Location: Earth Wanderer, longing for the stars.
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Just on a personal level, I will not ingest food imported from China, and this goes even for the 'mystery meat' in wontons (all tell me they are imported from China, but cannot vouch for the type of meat) from local restaurants. I honestly do not think our government inspects our food adequately and that we cannot rely on them to keep our food safe.

I used to love frozen pot stickers from my supermarket, wondered why they did not sell better until I read the label - made in China. They discontinued that brand and the current brand is made in the US and are yummy.
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Old 05-11-2012, 08:03 PM
 
21,050 posts, read 17,228,645 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mulhall View Post

I recently noticed that Taco Bell are expanding their franchise throughout the UK, along with Dennys, both of which are set to join KFC, McDonalds, Burger King, Subway, Quiznos, Starbucks, Krispy Kreme, Subway, Pizza Hut, Papa Johns, Domino's Pizza and numerous others. Ruby Tuesday also recently opened an outlet in Cardiff and Mexican Food Chains Chipotle and Freebirds World Burrito are also expanding. Whilst in terms of fashion groups such as Gap and Abercrombie and Fitch can be found on many UK High Streets.

These American chains are on top of the mass of home grown food and coffee chains seeling everything from noodles to pizzas to burgers and fried chicken etc.





When I see the UK chains expanding as fast in the US, I'll call it "globalization."
Until then I'll call it "americanization" because this description seems to fit much better.

Last edited by erasure; 05-11-2012 at 08:21 PM..
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Old 05-11-2012, 08:41 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
90,960 posts, read 87,314,874 times
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Look to Bali as a good model for using global tourism to preserve and support, rather than destroy, the local culture. This is the way to go, using tourist dollars and technical innovations to support and enhance cultural diversity. The Balinese have proven that it's do-able. So has Bhutan.
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Old 05-12-2012, 06:15 AM
 
697 posts, read 1,270,571 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by erasure View Post
When I see the UK chains expanding as fast in the US, I'll call it "globalization."
Until then I'll call it "americanization" because this description seems to fit much better.
Haven't British Chains such as Pret a Manger, Costa Coffee, Wagamama and Tescos expanded in to the American market????

Didn't a UK Company used to own Burger King, indeed many of these companies are now multi-nationals rather than American, and shares can be bought in them across international markets.

There are a whole host of British food and retail chains that have global interests








Last edited by Mulhall; 05-12-2012 at 06:30 AM..
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