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Old 04-13-2012, 04:29 AM
 
692 posts, read 1,355,446 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
Speaking of 'Paris Syndrome.' The US is where I found both the rudest and nicest people (since I can speak from a tourist's perspective).

Bus drivers, government workers, store people - often very grumpy, rude. Immigration guy barking orders as if we were naughty school children.

On the other hand a few people asked if I needed help when I was lost, very helpful people, it's quite easy to strike up a conversation.
I found US businesses to be polite in the US but often in a very false corporate 'Have a Nice Day' kind of way.

Obviously in terms of American people there is a word of difference between the hospitality found in big cities such as New York and more rural America, although the same can be said of most countries.
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Old 04-13-2012, 05:13 AM
 
Location: Beautiful Pennsylvania / Dull Germany
2,205 posts, read 3,333,156 times
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Quote:
Something really needs to be done about this. They are an embarrassment and give so many people a bad first impression of the US. I have seen it first hand coming back into the country and felt like giving these guys a lecture on proper manners to visitors, but that would get me delayed myself.
Yes... even I have experienced both, very friendly and very rude immigration staff, foreigners will always remember the rude one.

It depends on the airport, I made bad experiences in ATL. One guy asked me very unfriendly "what are you doing?" I told him to be a student. Next question "how did you pay for the flights?" - stupid question, I felt like answering "with my credit card dude" but replied friendly. Then he stamped my passport and pointed me to continue.

On the other hand, I made quite nice experiences at DTW, yes people are able to say something like "welcome" or "enjoy your stay".

Sometimes I think russian people are very rude, when I have been to Moscow and St.Petersburg, people in businesses or busses always looked grumpy and did not speak a lot of words. But maybe its just their culture to be not that outgoing and overwhelming, so I do not regard this as being rude.
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Old 04-13-2012, 07:13 PM
 
Location: Duluth, Minnesota, USA
7,639 posts, read 18,125,272 times
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I've been to 7 countries (US, Canada, France, Spain, Morocco, Mexico, Costa Rica), but live in the U.S. and was only in Canada for about two hours and France the same. Here are my experiences of the countries I've actually spent some time in.

People in Morocco were VERY friendly, although the touts were obnoxious. I actually ran from a tout in Moulay Idriss to the main grand-taxi stand and managed to board a grand-taxi back to Meknes. We pulled out right as the tout found me! Other than the touts, however, the friendliness of regular Moroccans is incredible. A random encounter with a woman in the Meknes medina ended up with me meeting the entire family and having cookies and tea. Another encounter on the bus scored me a comfortable house to stay in Marrakesh for the day, complete with two regal meals, a comfortable bed, and a Western-style bathroom. The kid wanted me to go to his family reunion (his original purpose for traveling to the city) so bad but I had to explain to him that I had a flight back to Spain the next day. He made me promise to return to Morocco. Remember, I met the kid the night before....

People in Spain varied from city to city, and certainly lacked "American-style" hospitality. The older people in Barcelona glared at me on the Metro; the younger people were quite nice, though, helping me find my way. One group of kids helped me find my way to the train station that was leaving for San Sebastian when the Metro service was temporarily suspended in areas. The people in San Sebastian / Basque Country were altogether kind. Those in Madrid seemed so/so, while those in southern Spain were all over the map as to kindness.

In Mexico, my friends' (who I had not seen in person for nearly two years) families were extremely kind. Perhaps knowing that I was unemployed, or perhaps just in their characteristic hospitality, they paid for practically everything, even though I offered to pay for things. When I was not with my friends, the people varied. The guy at Immigrations in the airport in Cancun was very nice; the people of Valladolid were quite reserved; those in Merida were generally more open, and a tour guide in Merida is now my friend on Facebook and remembered to say "Happy Birthday" to me.

Finally, I remember Costa Ricans as generally being kind and open.
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Old 04-13-2012, 08:01 PM
 
4,794 posts, read 12,376,749 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tvdxer View Post

although the touts were obnoxious. I actually ran from a tout in Moulay Idriss to the main grand-taxi stand and managed to board a grand-taxi back to Meknes. We pulled out right as the tout found me! Other than the touts, however, the friendliness of regular Moroccans is incredible.
I had to look up the definition of the word tout. Someone who solicits business. OK. What were these pushy solicitors trying to sell you in Morocco?
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Old 04-13-2012, 08:45 PM
 
14,725 posts, read 33,371,861 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kanhawk View Post
Something really needs to be done about this. They are an embarrassment and give so many people a bad first impression of the US. I have seen it first hand coming back into the country and felt like giving these guys a lecture on proper manners to visitors, but that would get me delayed myself.
I see your location. Something needs to be done about the Canadians at the immigration booths at the Peace Arch and the Pacific Truck Crossing. From Seattle, I would visit Vancouver once a month...for no reason at all. The same way people from LA would go to San Diego...for no reason at all. I was once asked to drive my car into the immigration office and be subjected to a barrage of questions...conservative looking guy, domestic car, nothing in the trunk, so what's their problem? I told them Vancouver was NOW my San Diego, and they let me proceed. Jerks.
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Old 04-13-2012, 11:48 PM
 
4,794 posts, read 12,376,749 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by robertpolyglot View Post
I see your location. Something needs to be done about the Canadians at the immigration booths at the Peace Arch and the Pacific Truck Crossing. From Seattle, I would visit Vancouver once a month...for no reason at all. The same way people from LA would go to San Diego...for no reason at all. I was once asked to drive my car into the immigration office and be subjected to a barrage of questions...conservative looking guy, domestic car, nothing in the trunk, so what's their problem? I told them Vancouver was NOW my San Diego, and they let me proceed. Jerks.
My problem isn't usually with the Canadians but getting back in, but it may depend on how you answer their questions. I usually tell them my specific reason and try not to be vague. Another option , especially on weekends is to head north from Bellingham to the Lynden crossing. They are bit more laid back there in my experience, but it could be the luck of the draw too.
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Old 04-14-2012, 12:37 AM
 
14,725 posts, read 33,371,861 times
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Originally Posted by kanhawk View Post
Another option , especially on weekends is to head north from Bellingham to the Lynden crossing. They are bit more laid back there in my experience, but it could be the luck of the draw too.
Right. I've done that only when the "every 10 minute" border crossing news coming in from the Canadian side says there is a back-up at the Peace Arch or the truck crossing. I think that the Lynden/Aldergrove crossing signals to them that someone has crossed often and is "in the know." Never been hassled at that crossing, though I don't like it because you then have to double back to Vancouver on the Trans-Canada (1) from way east.
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Old 04-14-2012, 12:50 AM
 
Location: The Midst of Insanity
3,219 posts, read 7,082,223 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Douglas Dakota View Post
Yes... even I have experienced both, very friendly and very rude immigration staff, foreigners will always remember the rude one.

It depends on the airport, I made bad experiences in ATL. One guy asked me very unfriendly "what are you doing?" I told him to be a student. Next question "how did you pay for the flights?" - stupid question, I felt like answering "with my credit card dude" but replied friendly. Then he stamped my passport and pointed me to continue.

On the other hand, I made quite nice experiences at DTW, yes people are able to say something like "welcome" or "enjoy your stay".

Sometimes I think russian people are very rude, when I have been to Moscow and St.Petersburg, people in businesses or busses always looked grumpy and did not speak a lot of words. But maybe its just their culture to be not that outgoing and overwhelming, so I do not regard this as being rude.
They are not rude at all, that is Russian culture. It's considered rude over there to smile at strangers.They are very somber and professional in business settings, very different from the over-the-top, shallow and ungenuine friendliness in the U.S.

People shouldn't judge other countries by their owns standards.
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Old 04-14-2012, 06:07 PM
JL
 
8,522 posts, read 14,537,016 times
Reputation: 7936
Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
The United States, when you return and pass through Customs and Immigration. In evry other country, you are welcomed as a guest. In the US, you are welcomed as a presumed criminal.
Interesting that you brought this up. I was quizzed by Customs upon arrival in Philly last year from my Spain trip. It was my fault though. I haven't traveled in a while internationally and it was the first time i used the 'new' passport made two years prior. Well, he asked me when the passport was made, but i hadn't forgotten and told him last year. He said "are you sure"...then i told him i wasn't sure. He then asked me why i was visiting Spain? How long i was there, blah, blah...


Quote:
Originally Posted by Vlajos View Post
Spain has the rudest people I've ever encountered. Love the place anyway.
I only met one rude person...otherwise, the people were pretty friendly though many seem very busy and walk really fast, so i was kinda reluctant to stop them to ask for directions when i got lost. I had to stop by a restaurant, bank, etc. to get directions when i was lost several times. A very enjoyable experience. My only regret was that i didn't have a better camera.
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Old 04-14-2012, 08:10 PM
 
26,787 posts, read 22,549,184 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by annika08 View Post
They are not rude at all, that is Russian culture. It's considered rude over there to smile at strangers.They are very somber and professional in business settings, very different from the over-the-top, shallow and ungenuine friendliness in the U.S.

People shouldn't judge other countries by their owns standards.
Annika it's not just rude, it's considered...gay))))
( No people in right mind smile at strangers when everyday life is full of s**t.. er.. unpleasant surprises. ( Including billionaires - they don't smile either))))

PS. I've noticed though that at the bottom of the society downtrodden Americans don't smile all that much either.
Why is that?
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