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Old 04-25-2012, 06:58 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,544 posts, read 56,068,476 times
Reputation: 11862

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
I disagree.

But, as a person who has lived in Asia for many years, and Europe for a year, and South America for a year. I found Europe to be the most boring. When I lived in Hungary, and again later in Spain (and briefly Austria)...I kept thinking, 'if I wanted to live among a bunch of monocultural white people, I could go to the American Midwest or somewhere.

When you are just living in 'Hungary' for example. It's very, very monocultural. Granted, you can travel to another country easily, but day-to-day, you're just around a bunch of Hungarian people all the time.

While the U.S. has GREAT swaths of land that is exactly the same thing as that concept but more widespread. There are also tons of real interesting pockets throughout the U.S. as well.

For example, give me NYC anyday, where I can get on the subway, and end up in Greenpoint (Polish neighborhood), and just be surrounded by all things Polish everywhere i look - all the magazine racks, the stores, etc. Than get on the subway again, and LIttle Bombay, and again and KoreaTown, etc. Than again, the same could probably be said for London, etc.
And Japan is less monocultural?

 
Old 04-25-2012, 07:58 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
102,213 posts, read 107,931,771 times
Reputation: 116160
Places like Hungary and Bulgaria appear to be monocultural only because they refuse to acknowledge the Roma (gypsy) presence on an official level.
 
Old 04-25-2012, 09:00 PM
 
2,223 posts, read 5,487,609 times
Reputation: 2081
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
I disagree.

But, as a person who has lived in Asia for many years, and Europe for a year, and South America for a year. I found Europe to be the most boring. When I lived in Hungary, and again later in Spain (and briefly Austria)...I kept thinking, 'if I wanted to live among a bunch of monocultural white people, I could go to the American Midwest or somewhere.

When you are just living in 'Hungary' for example. It's very, very monocultural. Granted, you can travel to another country easily, but day-to-day, you're just around a bunch of Hungarian people all the time.

While the U.S. has GREAT swaths of land that is exactly the same thing as that concept but more widespread. There are also tons of real interesting pockets throughout the U.S. as well.

For example, give me NYC anyday, where I can get on the subway, and end up in Greenpoint (Polish neighborhood), and just be surrounded by all things Polish everywhere i look - all the magazine racks, the stores, etc. Than get on the subway again, and LIttle Bombay, and again and KoreaTown, etc. Than again, the same could probably be said for London, etc.
"Asia" and implying it's not mono-cultural in one sentence is a little ridiculous, don't you think. Same with South America.. it's not exactly a magnet for immigrants.
 
Old 04-26-2012, 06:33 AM
 
Location: West Coast of Europe
25,947 posts, read 24,749,338 times
Reputation: 9728
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
You were talking about how isolated Oz is and then cultural proximity? By cultural proximity we are closer to the US.

^ Still, a lot closer to places like Tokyo, Hong Kong, Singapore. What major world cities are within a 10 hour radius of Seattle?
Yes, exactly. Culturally Australia is close to the US and Europe, but geographically it is closer to Asia. So if I wanted to go to a place of similar culture, I would feel isolated in Australia.

I don't understand your obsession with world cities frankly, most of real life on this planet does not happen in world cities.
 
Old 04-26-2012, 06:51 AM
 
9,326 posts, read 22,021,405 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Neuling View Post
Yes, exactly. Culturally Australia is close to the US and Europe, but geographically it is closer to Asia. So if I wanted to go to a place of similar culture, I would feel isolated in Australia.

I don't understand your obsession with world cities frankly, most of real life on this planet does not happen in world cities.
Really ??. Can you provide evidence? Half of THE WORLD lives in Cities, as per the UN. Hard to beleive everything that happens onh does so in rural areas.
 
Old 04-26-2012, 07:02 AM
 
Location: West Coast of Europe
25,947 posts, read 24,749,338 times
Reputation: 9728
Quote:
Originally Posted by minibrings View Post
Really ??. Can you provide evidence? Half of THE WORLD lives in Cities, as per the UN. Hard to beleive everything that happens onh does so in rural areas.
He or she was talking about MAJOR WORLD cities, just like in other threads, as if life were about NYC, London, Tokyo, and Paris.
If he meant just cities, I could present a long list of cities within a 10-hour radius of Seattle.
Why would anyone even want to leave Seattle if they were lucky enough to live there? Seattle is a way better place than any of those huge world cities mentioned.
 
Old 04-26-2012, 07:31 AM
 
Location: Eindhoven, Netherlands
10,646 posts, read 16,035,527 times
Reputation: 5286
Quote:
Originally Posted by Neuling View Post
Seattle is a way better place than any of those huge world cities mentioned.
In your opinion
 
Old 04-26-2012, 07:31 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,544 posts, read 56,068,476 times
Reputation: 11862
Quote:
Originally Posted by Neuling View Post
He or she was talking about MAJOR WORLD cities, just like in other threads, as if life were about NYC, London, Tokyo, and Paris.
If he meant just cities, I could present a long list of cities within a 10-hour radius of Seattle.
Why would anyone even want to leave Seattle if they were lucky enough to live there? Seattle is a way better place than any of those huge world cities mentioned.
Anyone who says something like that is not to be taken seriously when discussing world geography.
 
Old 04-26-2012, 08:11 AM
 
Location: West Coast of Europe
25,947 posts, read 24,749,338 times
Reputation: 9728
Quote:
Originally Posted by Davy-040 View Post
In your opinion
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
Anyone who says something like that is not to be taken seriously when discussing world geography.
What people tend to forget is that cities' attraction is limited, there are only so many attractive things a city may have. And when cities grow beyond a certain size, they don't get more interesting anymore, just bigger, more and more of the same further and further away from the historical city center, if there is one in the first place.

I would prefer Seattle to NYC or London anytime. The cost of living is lower, the landscape is more spectacular, it is greener, newer, cleaner, better for families, etc.
 
Old 04-26-2012, 09:11 AM
 
Location: Where the heart is...
4,927 posts, read 5,316,274 times
Reputation: 10674
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ninetails View Post

United States is the greatest country in the world. Agreed

You gotta admit though it's lacking the mysteriousness and
aura that other countries have though. Disagree

Just my opinion and feel free to agree or disagree.
There is no doubt that all that you say about the history and architecture of other countrie have a long and proud tradition and certainly beautiful. That being said...the world's architecture has been brought here as well and we have more than a few of our own bragging rights in that department as well; think Frank Floyd Wright and his contributions.

The Proud culture you originally reference of a particular nationality has been brought to the beautiful shores of this country since our very inception here by every country and people in the world.

Mystery and aura you say...I don't know about that, afterall we do have the CIA; just saying!

I am a proud American whose ancestry is from the 1600's in this country whose ancestors wanted out of Scotland, Ireland and Britain so much they came as indentured servants to the eastern shores of this country and trekked through the Appalachians to acquire land and farm. We won't get into the Cherokee or Black American side of the family, the history as you call it is far too long and fascinating...hugely fascinating.

I guarantee you that ALL the immigrants who have endured hardship to get here and remain here (legally and otherwise) TOTALLY DISAGREE with your observations and commentary.

With all due respect...educate yourself first and then reconsider your thoughts and comments and then move on, sincerely.

[SIZE=3]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_immigration_to_the_United_States[/SIZE]
[SIZE=3]History of immigration to the United States[/SIZE]
[SIZE=3]The history of immigration to the United States is a continuing story of peoples from more populated continents, particularly Europe and also Africa and Asia, crossing oceans to the new land. Historians do not treat the first indigenous settlers as immigrants. Starting around 1600 British and other Europeans settled primarily on the east coast. Later Africans were brought as slaves. During the [/SIZE][SIZE=3]nation's history[/SIZE][SIZE=3], the growing country experienced successive waves of immigration which rose and fell over time, particularly from [/SIZE][SIZE=3]Western Europe[/SIZE][SIZE=3], with the cost of transoceanic transportation sometimes paid by travelers becoming indentured servants after their arrival in the New World. At other times, immigration rules became more restrictive. With the ending of numerical restrictions in 1965 and the advent of cheap air travel immigration has increased from Asia and Latin America, much of the latter "illegal." Attitudes toward immigrants have cycled back and forth between favorable and hostile since the 1790s.[/SIZE]

Last edited by HomeIsWhere...; 04-26-2012 at 09:11 AM.. Reason: spelling
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