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Old 04-25-2012, 07:17 PM
 
Location: Toronto
3,338 posts, read 6,414,438 times
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For example, if the culture of the Pacific Northwest and the culture of the Deep South are examples of regional cultures of the United States, are they enough to be considered different cultures?

When is a place multicultural vs. monocultural?

Is the United States multicultural? Is France multicultural? The UK? Brazil? South Africa? Russia? Japan?

As well as how regional or divergent the cultures are, do you consider only a place multicultural if the cultures were brought over recently by recent international immigrants, as opposed to say, groups that influenced the country many generations ago or say cultures that split or merged, or branched out into many different cultures over time within the country itself without notable migration in the recent past?

This is also pertinent because as many have heard, multiculturalism is a popular buzzword in many countries now -- it seems often used to describe a place where there are many residents of international origin (with the implication that they carry their cultures with them that may be different from the place they're arriving to). Sometimes it is used with a very positive connotation, that of a vibrant, cosmopolitan, place where there are diverse types of culture, entertainment, music, food etc. Alternatively, it has also often gotten a negative connotation when people use it to mean a place with many recent immigrants who have come here with values that clash with the values of the original culture.

What do you think?
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Old 04-26-2012, 02:44 AM
 
Location: Paris, France
327 posts, read 948,005 times
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I would say there are very few countries round the world that are truly "monocultural" - ie where the vast majority of its residents are of one ethnicity, one religion and speak one language - and any minorities are very small (less than 5%). Japan is the most famous example, Korea another. In Europe I don't think anywhere fits that description fully, although Poland may be the closest contendors. Nearly all countries in the Americas, Africa, Asia and Australasia are extremely multicultural. There are over 6,000 languages spoken in the world, but only around 180 countries..

Most European countries were "multicultural" long before the modern era of mass immigration came along. Take the UK: the "indigenous" population is a patchwork of people who identify as English, Welsh, Scottish, Irish, and even identities such as Manx, Cornish and Channel Islander. Then you have indigenous minorities such as Gypsies/Travellers - each group with their own languages and culture. Add to that all the myriad identities that have grown up since the modern era of immigration - such as Black British, British Asian etc - which are now becoming "indigenous" in their own way.

Spain is another example of this. Originally "multicultural" (Catalans, Basques, Castilians etc), it is now even more so with large communities from Eastern and Northern Europe, Asia, Africa and Latin America settled there.

The US and Canada are examples of multiculturalism par excellence, as they have a long history of immigration. Europe until recently was a continent of emigration, so the transition is still being made. The problem is that "multiculturalism" - which is generally a positive concept - is too often associated with being the same as "immigration", which unfortunately in today's Europe, is not.
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Old 04-26-2012, 03:10 AM
 
355 posts, read 1,116,473 times
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In the western world (CEE, Latin American, North America, Australia, South Africa) there is no multiculturalism.

You have a mainstream European-based culture and then you have "ghettos", "banlieus", "favelas", "ranchitos" inhabited by people not belonging to mainstream European-based culture.

Multiculturalism is a French buzzword used by Populists, Socialists, Peronists, etc.
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Old 04-26-2012, 03:40 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,682 posts, read 50,591,685 times
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Yeah I think few countries are truly multicultural in that there are several fairly prominent cultures competing side by side. Many nations have one dominant culture, with several minority cultures.

Examples of the former might be Switzerland, with several distinct cultures coexisting. While the former could include Canada, which still has a predominantly 'Canadian' culture (European with a bit of Native derived) with other influences.

Then you have virtual monocultures like Japan with very little actual foreign culture. But then again, you could say the fact Japan has McDonald's, so in a way it's a multi-faceted culture, with Ronald McDonald competing with ramen. Would that also make it multi-cultural in a sense?
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Old 04-26-2012, 03:46 AM
 
Location: Brisbane
4,219 posts, read 6,226,994 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stumbler. View Post
For example, if the culture of the Pacific Northwest and the culture of the Deep South are examples of regional cultures of the United States, are they enough to be considered different cultures?

When is a place multicultural vs. monocultural?

Is the United States multicultural? Is France multicultural? The UK? Brazil? South Africa? Russia? Japan?

As well as how regional or divergent the cultures are, do you consider only a place multicultural if the cultures were brought over recently by recent international immigrants, as opposed to say, groups that influenced the country many generations ago or say cultures that split or merged, or branched out into many different cultures over time within the country itself without notable migration in the recent past?

This is also pertinent because as many have heard, multiculturalism is a popular buzzword in many countries now -- it seems often used to describe a place where there are many residents of international origin (with the implication that they carry their cultures with them that may be different from the place they're arriving to). Sometimes it is used with a very positive connotation, that of a vibrant, cosmopolitan, place where there are diverse types of culture, entertainment, music, food etc. Alternatively, it has also often gotten a negative connotation when people use it to mean a place with many recent immigrants who have come here with values that clash with the values of the original culture.

What do you think?
Thats what i think,

If a person was born in Australia to immigrant parents from vietnam, China, Sudan etc, went to school hear, and spoke fluent english, I would just consider them to be culturally Australian, regardless of where their parents are born.

South Korea is very Monocultural.

Last edited by danielsa1775; 04-26-2012 at 04:08 AM..
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Old 04-26-2012, 03:48 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,682 posts, read 50,591,685 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by danielsa1775 View Post
Thats what i think,

I would consider a person born in Australia to immigrant parents from vietnam, China, Sudan etc etc to be nothing other than Australian.
And for the most part, so would they, although in the rare instances that person doesn't integrate into Australian society, that's a bit more complex.
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Old 04-26-2012, 04:15 AM
 
355 posts, read 1,116,473 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
Yeah I think few countries are truly multicultural in that there are several fairly prominent cultures competing side by side. Many nations have one dominant culture, with several minority cultures.

Examples of the former might be Switzerland, with several distinct cultures coexisting. While the former could include Canada, which still has a predominantly 'Canadian' culture (European with a bit of Native derived) with other influences.

Then you have virtual monocultures like Japan with very little actual foreign culture. But then again, you could say the fact Japan has McDonald's, so in a way it's a multi-faceted culture, with Ronald McDonald competing with ramen. Would that also make it multi-cultural in a sense?
----

Switzerland is not multicultural at all. The fact that some Swish speak Swiss German or Swiss French is notwithstanding. The same thing goes with Canada.

Multicultural does not involve the combination of different European cultures.

I don't know what McDonalds has to do with multiculturality. The Japanese culture absorbs other cultures since Perry, so anything could be part of the Japanese culture. They even dance Salsa and Flamenco.

The "multicultural" buzzword was coined thinking in a utopic amalgamation of the French society with MUSLIMS.

East Asians are not considered as part of the Multicultural buzzword because they assimilate rapidly in western societies in a functional manner. For example, Vietnamese, Cambodians and Moluccans were an integral part of Europe when the word was coined.

Last edited by Cocoricoco; 04-26-2012 at 04:27 AM..
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Old 04-26-2012, 04:30 AM
 
Location: Brisbane
4,219 posts, read 6,226,994 times
Reputation: 3450
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cocoricoco View Post
----

Switzerland is not multicultural at all. The fact that some Swish speak Swiss German or Swiss French is notwithstanding. The same thing goes with Canada.

Multicultural does not involve the combination of different European cultures.

I don't know what McDonalds has to do with multiculturality. The Japanese culture absorbs other cultures since Perry, so anything could be part of the Japanese culture. They even dance Salsa and Flamenco.
Why not? The Greek and Italian immigration hear substantially changed our almost 100% British/Irish influenced culture after world war 2.

You get new languages, food, Architectural styles, dance styles, religions, wine making techniques etc, you name it.

I would consider all thoes things to add to a countries culture.
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Old 04-26-2012, 04:48 AM
 
355 posts, read 1,116,473 times
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That was before, some 40 years ago.
Not anymore.
English or Irish Pubs are not considered "multicultural" anywhere in Europe.
When European politicians talk about multiculturalism, they refer to Islamics.
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Old 04-26-2012, 05:11 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
24,953 posts, read 31,917,939 times
Reputation: 10239
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cocoricoco View Post
----

Switzerland is not multicultural at all. The fact that some Swish speak Swiss German or Swiss French is notwithstanding. The same thing goes with Canada.

Multicultural does not involve the combination of different European cultures.
Canada and Switzerland are best described as multinational states in this respect.

In Canada, multiculturalism always refers to the presence of immigrants or at least immigrant-descended populations (Italian, Ukrainian, Chinese, etc.), not to the English-speaking vs. French-speaking dynamic.
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