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Old 05-31-2012, 06:21 PM
 
Location: Duluth, Minnesota, USA
7,639 posts, read 18,134,711 times
Reputation: 6913

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Many sociologists divide the U.S. up into five or six social classes, based not only on income (which tends to overlap between classes) but also education and occupational prestige. From lowest to highest:

Lower class: Often dependent on government transfers (welfare). Unemployed, informal economy, or low-end service jobs. High school education or less. Common stereotypes: homelessness, gang membership, food stamps

Working poor: Tend to have low-end service jobs and a meager standard of living (by U.S. standards; in some or most other places, they'd be rich). High school education or lower. Common stereotypes: earned income tax credits (negative taxation), wage slaves, complicated family situations, crappy cars

Working class: Tend to have a meager to comfortable standard of living. Head of household may be a plumber, construction worker, or factory laborer. High school education or maybe some vocational training. Common stereotypes: NASCAR racing, domestic beer (but not from brewpubs), Carhartt jackets, pick-up trucks

Middle class / lower middle class: Tend to have a comfortable income, but not a particularly opulent standard of living. Head of household may work in sales or as a nurse or lower-level management. Some college or bachelor's degree. Common stereotypes: McMansions (at least in low cost-of-living areas), soccer / hockey moms, SUVs

Upper middle class: Doctors, lawyers, higher-level managers, etc. make up this class, which represents most of the upper 10% of the U.S. population. Living standards, at least in terms of ability to acquire material goods, are very high by almost any measure, but most adults in this class must still work for a living. Graduate / professional degrees common. Sometimes divided up into "professional" and "managerial" subcultures. Common stereotypes: NPR listener / PBS viewer, BMW / Mercedes owner, foreign (i.e. not on the continent) vacations, intellectual elites

Upper class: Makes up ~1% of U.S. population, but their influence is disproportionate. Not only income, but wealth comes into play here, with members of the UC able to retire at any age. Living standards opulent to extraordinarily so. Professional degrees from elite universities common. Common stereotypes: private plane, yachts, multiple lavish homes, trust fund kids.

What are the classes in YOUR country?
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Old 05-31-2012, 09:39 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,544 posts, read 56,093,509 times
Reputation: 11862
Australian is a 'classless society' in more ways than one!
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Old 06-01-2012, 01:15 AM
 
14,767 posts, read 17,125,146 times
Reputation: 20658
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
Australian is a 'classless society' in more ways than one!
hmm I think we have a massive middle class & smaller upper middle class and a small upper class. ....


Interestingly the plumber or sparkie in Australia is probably earning close to $100k
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Old 06-01-2012, 01:22 AM
 
Location: Monnem Germany/ from San Diego
2,296 posts, read 3,126,940 times
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I think these classes exist everywhere; the difference is in the ability or lack thereof of people to ascend in the class structure.

Also, income/finance may be linked to class but does not define it.
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Old 06-01-2012, 01:37 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,544 posts, read 56,093,509 times
Reputation: 11862
Quote:
Originally Posted by artemis agrotera View Post
hmm I think we have a massive middle class & smaller upper middle class and a small upper class. ....


Interestingly the plumber or sparkie in Australia is probably earning close to $100k
Income seems to have less to do with profession, although 'class' seems to have to do with your address and how 'cultivated' you are.

Those rich sparkies still seem to want to live in like Joondalup, where they have their 'boys toys' and go to Bali three times a year.
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Old 06-01-2012, 05:10 AM
 
7,855 posts, read 10,297,603 times
Reputation: 5615
Quote:
Originally Posted by tvdxer View Post
Many sociologists divide the U.S. up into five or six social classes, based not only on income (which tends to overlap between classes) but also education and occupational prestige. From lowest to highest:

Lower class: Often dependent on government transfers (welfare). Unemployed, informal economy, or low-end service jobs. High school education or less. Common stereotypes: homelessness, gang membership, food stamps

Working poor: Tend to have low-end service jobs and a meager standard of living (by U.S. standards; in some or most other places, they'd be rich). High school education or lower. Common stereotypes: earned income tax credits (negative taxation), wage slaves, complicated family situations, crappy cars

Working class: Tend to have a meager to comfortable standard of living. Head of household may be a plumber, construction worker, or factory laborer. High school education or maybe some vocational training. Common stereotypes: NASCAR racing, domestic beer (but not from brewpubs), Carhartt jackets, pick-up trucks

Middle class / lower middle class: Tend to have a comfortable income, but not a particularly opulent standard of living. Head of household may work in sales or as a nurse or lower-level management. Some college or bachelor's degree. Common stereotypes: McMansions (at least in low cost-of-living areas), soccer / hockey moms, SUVs

Upper middle class: Doctors, lawyers, higher-level managers, etc. make up this class, which represents most of the upper 10% of the U.S. population. Living standards, at least in terms of ability to acquire material goods, are very high by almost any measure, but most adults in this class must still work for a living. Graduate / professional degrees common. Sometimes divided up into "professional" and "managerial" subcultures. Common stereotypes: NPR listener / PBS viewer, BMW / Mercedes owner, foreign (i.e. not on the continent) vacations, intellectual elites

Upper class: Makes up ~1% of U.S. population, but their influence is disproportionate. Not only income, but wealth comes into play here, with members of the UC able to retire at any age. Living standards opulent to extraordinarily so. Professional degrees from elite universities common. Common stereotypes: private plane, yachts, multiple lavish homes, trust fund kids.

What are the classes in YOUR country?

all of the above , the working poor in ireland are often refered to as the coping class but a sizeable number of the middle class could fit this description

one of the weird things about this country is that all classes recieve wellfare of some sort from the goverment , a billionaires kids will recieve whats called childrens allowance once per month and this will be the same amount as a mom and dad with kids who live in a grotty appartment , the civil service are too lazy to means test it and the politicans too cynical
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