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Old 08-05-2012, 04:03 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
67,650 posts, read 60,894,826 times
Reputation: 101078

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Originally Posted by View Post
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I didn’t think your posts were snarky. You are a great new poster in the World forum.
Thank you!

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I enjoy European, Asian, and North American culture equally for the best places in each region.
Me too.

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For European my top 8 favorite nationalities culture are: France, UK/England, Netherlands, Denmark, Germany, Switzerland, Belgium, Sweden.
In order of preference, mine are: the UK, Germany, Belgium, the Czech Republic, the Netherlands, France, and then everyone else can get in line behind them!

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For Asian my top 8 favorite nationalities culture are: Taiwan, Japan, Thailand, South Korea, China, India, Singapore, Vietnam.
Mine are, in order: South Korea, Japan, China, Vietnam, Thailand, Malaysia.

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That is fun, surprising, and enriching you have a lot of that South Korean connections!
I know - what are the odds that this little ol' white girl would end up with a Korean brother, a Korean daughter in law, and a Korean grandson (not thru the Korean daughter in law -and none of them are related!)??? It's so weird - in a good way.

One great thing I've discovered via all this Korean influence is that they have FANTASTIC and very spicy food. I just bought these little leaves that taste sort of minty, that you wrap around grilled pork or chicken and shallots and water chesnuts, then you dip this into various sauces. WOW!

Another really simple Korean sauce that my daughter in law introduced me to is made with nothing but pure sesame oil, sea salt and crushed black pepper. You dip bite size pieces of meat in it - just a little taste goes a long way. It is SO FREAKING GOOD, I couldn't believe it!

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A lot of people do say there is plenty of vibrant noticeable differences in character and scenery between North Germany vs. South Germany.
Oh I think it's obvious. The people of Southern Germany are a lot more open and gregarious. The scenery is strikingly different, as is the weather. The architecture is very different as well.

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I am glad you can still see other parts of Germany outside of Bavaria also has some inviting/desirable/intriguing locations. However, I understand you are especially captivated and infatuated with Bavaria right now.
Twenty years later and I'm still enamored! I've been back several times and love it just as much each time I return.

However, I have never been as far north as Hamburg. Farthest north I've been is Berlin in the east and Dusseldorf in the west.

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Recently, I consistently prefer more easygoing/laid back, slower pace, less crowds, etc. For one example, I prefer to be in Seattle again right now compared to New York City, but for other reasons too. Those are the two places I lived in so far.
I haven't been to Seattle, but I have been to Portland, Oregon and then drove down the coast a bit. I really, really, really like that part of our country.

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What specific city/town do you live in Texas at the moment?
I live in a small town in northeast Texas. We actually have rolling, green hills, and lots of trees and lakes around here! I really like the rural atmosphere but the very close proximity of Dallas, Fort Worth, and Shreveport, Louisiana. I DON'T like that we live so far from the coast - I am a beach girl! That has been hard on me.
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Old 08-05-2012, 10:57 PM
 
2,939 posts, read 4,125,528 times
Reputation: 2791
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
I think it's a given that people move to where the economy is good and where the jobs are. That's been happening throughout history.

I can't speak for states I haven't visited. But you don't think there are incentives for people to live in Maryland and Northern Virginia?
I was speaking to the map that was posted that showed migration patterns by state as well as to the suggestion that people are flocking to these places because they're great places to live.

Bentonville, AR may very well be a great place to live but it's not on my radar. I wouldn't wake up one morning and say "you know what, we should really move to Bentonville. I hear the quality of life is great. Let's start looking for work there." Those places are not lifestyle destinations in the way that Florida or Arizona have been or that Portland or NYC are - places that people go because they really want to be there.

The only commonalities between the states gaining a lot of people on that map is that they have metro areas with relatively strong economies in spite of the recession. A lot of that is related to the energy industry (or the federal gov't) In order to get a more nuanced view of what is happening there are more detailed sources out there. For instance, growth in Maryland is being driven by DC - not by Baltimore or Salisbury.

Anyway, of course there are reasons to live in the DC Metro. I'm not saying otherwise. I'm just saying, regarding the map that was posted, people from outside of Virginia (and probably people inside virginia) don't generally say, "Virginia is great. Let's move to Roanoke."
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Old 08-05-2012, 11:26 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
67,650 posts, read 60,894,826 times
Reputation: 101078
Quote:
Originally Posted by drive carephilly View Post
I was speaking to the map that was posted that showed migration patterns by state as well as to the suggestion that people are flocking to these places because they're great places to live.

Bentonville, AR may very well be a great place to live but it's not on my radar. I wouldn't wake up one morning and say "you know what, we should really move to Bentonville. I hear the quality of life is great. Let's start looking for work there." Those places are not lifestyle destinations in the way that Florida or Arizona have been or that Portland or NYC are - places that people go because they really want to be there.

The only commonalities between the states gaining a lot of people on that map is that they have metro areas with relatively strong economies in spite of the recession. A lot of that is related to the energy industry (or the federal gov't) In order to get a more nuanced view of what is happening there are more detailed sources out there. For instance, growth in Maryland is being driven by DC - not by Baltimore or Salisbury.

Anyway, of course there are reasons to live in the DC Metro. I'm not saying otherwise. I'm just saying, regarding the map that was posted, people from outside of Virginia (and probably people inside virginia) don't generally say, "Virginia is great. Let's move to Roanoke."
I'd move to Virginia in a heartbeat.

In fact, my husband and I are strongly considering doing so - because we like it so much. He has been working up in West Virginia (we live in Texas) and poking around. We could live anywhere in WV, VA, or KY and it would work fine.

I feel like a kid in a candy store just trying to decide where to live in any of those beautiful states! Unfortunately the Tidewater region is too far east to be practical - but the Shenandoah Valley/Appalachians would work - and we'd still just be a few hours from the beach.

Virginia is a beautiful, beautiful state - and some people DO decide to move somewhere, even somewhere rural, just because they like it so much there.

And my parents moved to Texas just because they liked Tyler, Texas so much. They sold their house in Georgia and just packed up and moved - my dad owns his own business so he could do that. Just because they liked the town so much.
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Old 08-06-2012, 06:02 PM
Status: "From 31 to 41 Countries Visited: )" (set 6 days ago)
 
4,640 posts, read 13,917,464 times
Reputation: 4052
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
Thank you!

Me too.
I enjoy it when I find lots of other people that are equally enthusiastic, fascinated, enchanted, and inspired with Europe/Asia/North America.


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In order of preference, mine are: the UK, Germany, Belgium, the Czech Republic, the Netherlands, France, and then everyone else can get in line behind them!
All of those countries/nationalities made my top 8 for culture in Europe too, except for Czech Republic.

I don’t know Czech Republic enough to be able to categorize it for that, but I can tell that Prague is a nice place in it also with a high quality of life.

I also know I like Italy, Spain, Austria, and Norway but they don’t quite make my top 8.

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Mine are, in order: South Korea, Japan, China, Vietnam, Thailand, Malaysia.
Around 5 out of 6 of those countries/nationalities made my list too.

The exception for this was Malaysia, but I still like it and it is 9th place in that region. I also probably would enjoy Cambodia, Laos, Nepal, and Bhutan, but not nearly as much as the other 9 countries.

We still have a lot of similar preferences with plenty of locations.

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I know - what are the odds that this little ol' white girl would end up with a Korean brother, a Korean daughter in law, and a Korean grandson (not thru the Korean daughter in law -and none of them are related!)??? It's so weird - in a good way.

One great thing I've discovered via all this Korean influence is that they have FANTASTIC and very spicy food. I just bought these little leaves that taste sort of minty, that you wrap around grilled pork or chicken and shallots and water chesnuts, then you dip this into various sauces. WOW!

Another really simple Korean sauce that my daughter in law introduced me to is made with nothing but pure sesame oil, sea salt and crushed black pepper. You dip bite size pieces of meat in it - just a little taste goes a long way. It is SO FREAKING GOOD, I couldn't believe it!
Your South Korean connections is like winning a lot of money in the lottery in terms of the possibilities of having that occur!

I never tried actual Korean food before, so it is a nice surprise if Korean food is as fantastic and tasty as other Asian cuisines. I will try that out soon.

My favorite cuisines that I find most wonderful and impressive are: Thai, Indian, Italian, Chinese, and Malaysian.

After that, also Singaporean, Vietnamese, French, Japanese, Mexican, Ethiopian, Moroccan.

When you visited South Korea, what are all of the other best places to explore other than Seoul? Outside of Seoul, I don’t know much if anything about the other locations in South Korea.

I am sure it surprises you how extremely different and infinitely better South Korea became from North Korea when it used to be the same country/same ethnicity.

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Oh I think it's obvious. The people of Southern Germany are a lot more open and gregarious. The scenery is strikingly different, as is the weather. The architecture is very different as well.

However, I have never been as far north as Hamburg. Farthest north I've been is Berlin in the east and Dusseldorf in the west.
When you visit Germany next time, you could try to visit some places north of Berlin/Dusseldorf such as Hamburg, Rostock, and Schleswig-Holstein.

It is not too far away from Southern Germany in geographic distance.

The obvious noticeable vibrant differences in character and scenery between North Germany vs. South Germany sounds interesting and offering a nice variety.

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Twenty years later and I'm still enamored! I've been back several times and love it just as much each time I return.
That is great and comforting when people have the same consistent optimistic views about something for a very long time, without being susceptible to a change of opinions.

This includes being captivated with the same locations for a long time such as how you feel about Bavaria/Southern Germany.

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I live in a small town in northeast Texas. We actually have rolling, green hills, and lots of trees and lakes around here! I really like the rural atmosphere but the very close proximity of Dallas, Fort Worth, and Shreveport, Louisiana. I DON'T like that we live so far from the coast - I am a beach girl! That has been hard on me.
I am glad you are finding continued satisfaction and contentment with the places you live in, including for Texas.

I am equally a beaches and mountains person simultaneously. Also true with plenty of cities of varying sizes and nature scenery areas.

Last edited by ; 08-06-2012 at 06:35 PM..
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Old 08-22-2012, 03:48 PM
 
250 posts, read 661,719 times
Reputation: 110
Both Coasts are too liberal. Texas would be a good state to live in IMO.

However, if I could choose between either the West Coast or the East Coast, I would choose the former because there are more fellow Chinese and people are friendlier on the West Coast. The West Coast is the Best Coast, the wealthiest and friendliest Coast (aren't Bostonians snobs, after all?) so if you don't like the West Coast, don't live in America.
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Old 08-22-2012, 06:33 PM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
27,558 posts, read 28,652,113 times
Reputation: 25148
Quote:
Originally Posted by Haowen Wong View Post
Both Coasts are too liberal. Texas would be a good state to live in IMO.

However, if I could choose between either the West Coast or the East Coast, I would choose the former because there are more fellow Chinese and people are friendlier on the West Coast. The West Coast is the Best Coast, the wealthiest and friendliest Coast (aren't Bostonians snobs, after all?) so if you don't like the West Coast, don't live in America.
That would be factually incorrect. The east coast of the U.S. has a significantly higher GDP than the west coast.
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Old 08-22-2012, 06:51 PM
 
14,725 posts, read 33,366,102 times
Reputation: 8949
I am a native of the West Coast. Most of my relatives initially came to this country through the tri-state NYC area.

Granted, the West has the interesting topography and better climate, but I like the personal style in the Northeast much better. When I visit there, I feel very at home. The only thing I don't like is the housing stock, since a lot of it is older and the newer stuff doesn't have a lot of brick/stone. OTOH, I like the big cities, the Atlantic Ocean, the fall, the ethnic vibe, proximity to Eastern Canada, and the fact that red-eying to Europe is that much easier.

Second would be the Southeast, having lived in metro Atlanta.

LAST, of the places I've lived, would be the Pacific Northwest. It shares a coastline, and is immediately above CA, but it is another world. The personal style is completely different, and I mean that in a negative manner.
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Old 08-22-2012, 06:53 PM
JL
 
8,522 posts, read 14,534,042 times
Reputation: 7936
If i could afford to live in San Diego or SF, i would move there in a heartbeat. Otherwise, i would prefer staying where i am right now. I'm used to the heat/humidity.
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Old 08-22-2012, 07:38 PM
 
Location: Leeds, UK
22,112 posts, read 29,578,708 times
Reputation: 8819
Commented on here before, but I prefer to live in affluent areas, that are close to big cities with close access to beautiful countryside.

Basically your typical middle-class commutervilleland, such as Surrey or Cheshire or North Yorkshire.
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Old 08-23-2012, 01:30 AM
 
Location: Estonia
1,759 posts, read 1,878,721 times
Reputation: 1109
Quote:
Originally Posted by cmptrwlt View Post
Norway:
Northern Norway: Lofoten is stunning. I would not dream of living up there. It is way too cold and dark (even by Norwegian standards). Poor job opportunities.
Lofoten isn't cold, it's the warmest place in the world for its latitude. It doesn't even have a single month below freezing.

Estonia is a tiny country but it's roughly divided between north and south. North is mostly flatland with a higher population density, south has an undulating terrain and more of a rural feel. I prefer it in the north as I think southerners are hippies.

North:






South:




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