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View Poll Results: Which one if your favorite
NYC 117 37.26%
Paris 50 15.92%
Tokyo 49 15.61%
London 98 31.21%
Voters: 314. You may not vote on this poll

 
 
Old 12-10-2012, 01:18 PM
 
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I'm starting to rank London as high as Tokyo. I've grown to really love London recently. That city offers almost everything Tokyo does (efficient mass transit, low crime, nightlife, beautiful women with similar fashion styles) and without the language and cultural barrier. London's diverse population makes it seem more tolerant to foreigners and less xenophobic. London's weather may not be as nice as Tokyo's, but it seems safe from natural disasters. Tokyo does have an edge in food and technology.
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Old 12-12-2012, 06:14 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by valentro View Post
Yeahh by GDP they're relatively close but if we're only going by "GDP" as any indication for why an economy is stronger than Los Angeles should be the worlds third most important city. No way that's happening. I can see where the confusion came from, I said "larger economies" that's not true- I meant that in their economies being more globally influential.

London's economy is more tied to the world, whether it's by extension of it's political clout in which case it's tied immensely with the United States & Israel as well as the financial markets of New York & Tokyo. Paris isn't that same way, it plays a relative backseat to London on that front.
Politicaly, I'm afraid you're wrong, actually UK is pretty isolated in Europe, the voices that count being the german and the french ones... also, France and USA are enjoying very good relations as we have with Russia and China, as for diplomacy, well... the BBC said that : French diplomatic service is the world's best, UK says, I have nothing to do with the BBC statments, I swear !

Also Paris is, thanks to its companies, as international than London, there are more companies among the fortune 500 based in Paris (30 are based in Paris) than in London (only 22), also, there are more conferences in Paris than in London... (here and here), France is exporting more than UK, all in all, excepted the financial fields and despite the fact some French banks are among the most important in Europe, Paris is actually very closed to London... I just wonder what kind of power really have London when you know the big financial activity of London is actually essentially based on off shore activities...

Quote:
Paris is the most leisure friendly city in the world with I believe the most tourists and then London, New York, as well as Tokyo round out the top echelon of that as well with London being only slightly behind Paris on that. That's a draw.
It's not what appears in a recent study made by the mayor of London office
Mayor office
and here, I swear, I have nothing to do with the statements made by boris !
All in all, it's far to be a draw, Paris is far ahead...

Quote:
For innovation Tokyo takes it, it's a leader in the group then it's New York & London. Paris once again plays a backseat to that. Paris cant keep up with London in energy, technology, & such either.
Again, not really, I wonder where your information are coming from, here is a study made by Thomas Reuters (based in London !) that is a very serious company, and sorry about that... but there is not one british companies cited as one of the most innovated in the world... France ? 13 (Alcatel Lucent - Arkema - CNRS- Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique- EADS- IEP Energies Nouvelles- L'Oréal - Michelin- Renault- Saint-Gobain - Snecma- Thalès- Valeo...) most of them are based in Paris... the same can be said about R&D pdf page 12... you are even not closed...
But I'm looking forward your explanations about that... but EDF (electricité de France) energy being the largest electricity provider of London and UK as a whole, then I think you may be right about the energy !



Quote:
Paris is a great city, a great city for the world- but in my opinion it's not far fetched to say & see global studies topping New York, London, or Tokyo but it is for Paris. Just like Hong Kong, it's a powerful city but for that reason, it's behind those other three.
Most of this studies are based on financial services, where London is actually very good (for the moment, since even here, in 2012 the storm of the financial crisis is not came to an end in London), the only thing missing to Paris is the human capital (as shown by Minato Ku in a previous post)... that's not really a big deal... other than that, London is actually behind Paris, and I’d add that London is really looks like a provincial city, semi-detached house, few tall buildings, no freeways inside the city, narrow streets, etc... but yes, in London you can feel the hype… sorry, the vibe ! you've got just prejudices, you don't really know the city of Paris, that's it...
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Old 12-14-2012, 04:03 AM
 
250 posts, read 459,189 times
Reputation: 350
Quote:
Politicaly, I'm afraid you're wrong, actually UK is pretty isolated in Europe, the voices that count being the german and the french ones... also, France and USA are enjoying very good relations as we have with Russia and China, as for diplomacy, well... the BBC said that : French diplomatic service is the world's best, UK says, I have nothing to do with the BBC statments, I swear !

Also Paris is, thanks to its companies, as international than London, there are more companies among the fortune 500 based in Paris (30 are based in Paris) than in London (only 22), also, there are more conferences in Paris than in London... (here and here), France is exporting more than UK, all in all, excepted the financial fields and despite the fact some French banks are among the most important in Europe, Paris is actually very closed to London...
A number of problems with your reasoning here:

1. You conflate cultural and economic influence with political influence. There is some overlap between the two, but the two are far from synonymous.
2. You conflate Western Europe with "the rest of the world".
3. You cite the number of US-based companies with a foothold in Paris as a singular index of global cultural/economic influence.


Quote:
I just wonder what kind of power really have London when you know the big financial activity of London is actually essentially based on off shore activities...
It's precisely London's financial and cultural role as mediator, arbiter and global hub for transactions, contracts and business deals pertaining to "off-shore" economies and businesses that classify it as having far greater global reach than Paris.


Quote:
It's not what appears in a recent study made by the mayor of London office Mayor office and here, I swear, I have nothing to do with the statements made by boris ! All in all, it's far to be a draw, Paris is far ahead...
I've looked through the WCCR reference you've provided and, if anything, the figures contradict your claim. Note some of the important indices:

No. of international tourists: London 15,216,000; Paris 13,300,000.
• No. of night clubs, discos and dance halls: London 337, Paris 190
• No. of bars: London 2,143, Paris 3,350.
• No. of restaurants: 37,450; Paris 24,149.
• Visits to five most popular museums/galleries (million): London 25.3; Paris 23.4.
• Other heritage/historical sites: London 18,901; Paris 3,792.
• % public green space (parks and gardens): London 38.4%; Paris 9.4%.

Note also the findings of similar analyses, such as Mastercard's "Global Top 20 Destination Cities by International Visitor Spending" [Mastercard, 2011]:

1. London: 25.6bn [Billion USD]
2. New York: 20.3bn
3. Paris: 20.3bn


Quote:
Again, not really, I wonder where your information are coming from, here is a study made by Thomas Reuters (based in London !) that is a very serious company, and sorry about that... but there is not one british companies cited as one of the most innovated in the world... France ? 13 (Alcatel Lucent - Arkema - CNRS- Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique- EADS- IEP Energies Nouvelles- L'Oréal - Michelin- Renault- Saint-Gobain - Snecma- Thalès- Valeo...) most of them are based in Paris... the same can be said about R&D pdf page 12... you are even not closed...
The Thomas Reuters reference you've provided identifies its key index of innovation as the capability of a large multinational company to "outperform the S&P 500 ... in market cap weighted revenue and add ... jobs". In other words, its criterion of innovation is defective, misleading and overly stringent.

Innovation, as the general public and the business world as a whole understands it, is a far more broadly inclusive term. Note, for example: New York, London and Toronto top list of world’s best cities for business, innovation and living – Quartz


Quote:
and I’d add that London is really looks like a provincial city, semi-detached house, few tall buildings, no freeways inside the city, narrow streets, etc...
This is the kind of statement that comes from people that are either selectively perceptive of London, or extrapolate their experiences of limited segments of the city (often of zones 2-5) to London as a whole. When making comparisons between London and other cities, comparisons must be fair. That means Central London versus the selected areas of Paris that are bearable to visitors.

Central London is not a clearly defined geographic territory. However, even if we were to be extremely selective and include "only" the West End, City, Canary Wharf, South Bank and uptown residential areas (Kensington, Chelsea, Mayfair and Knightsbridge, among many others), it would still be geographically vast, and anything but "provincial" architecturally, culturally and infrastructurally.


Borrowing some comments/links from an earlier New York vs London thread, and from earlier in this thread, the dominant architectural style along major avenues and thoroughfares in Central London is modernised/glass-fronted neo-classical and regency architecture:





Townhouses and apartments predominate in up-town residential areas:





And the financial district, Canary Wharf, Vauxhall and Blackfriars/Southwark are home to burgeoning hi-tech skylines:





Quote:
but yes, in London you can feel the hype… sorry, the vibe ! you've got just prejudices, you don't really know the city of Paris, that's it...
Yet that is the problem with Paris. There is more to a city than its architecture, infrastructure, political and economic ties, its population and statistical indices. Some may refer to it as a synergism or a feeling that is intangible and often hard to define, and does not appear to be wholly subjective.

I mentioned this earlier, but however much I want to like Paris for its architectural beauty and charm, it falls short of the cultural dynamism, sophistication and vibrancy of New York City and London. There are some breath-takingly beautiful areas in Central Paris, but as a global city it is simply not in the same category as London.

I think the two videos below only slightly capture the difference in feel between the cities.

Beautiful Paris:



Shopping in Central London:


Last edited by Citizen401; 12-14-2012 at 05:33 AM..
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Old 12-14-2012, 09:14 AM
 
Location: Scotland
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Nice pictures Citizen401
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Old 12-14-2012, 05:35 PM
 
Location: Paris
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Citizen401 View Post
3. You cite the number of US-based companies with a foothold in Paris as a singular index of global cultural/economic influence.
Fortune global 500 companies are not necessarily US-based. These 30 companies obviously have their HQs Paris, which ranks 3rd below Tokyo and Beijing. Or does Crédit Agricole sound American to you?



Quote:
I think the two videos below only slightly capture the difference in feel between the cities.

Beautiful Paris:

Shopping in Central London:
You're talking about a "fair comparisons" yet you post a sepia video featuring some retro music vs a video of busy shooping streets.
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Old 12-14-2012, 06:08 PM
 
286 posts, read 1,349,172 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Citizen401 View Post
A number of problems with your reasoning here:
All I can see here is a problem of reading comprehension from you

Quote:
1. You conflate cultural and economic influence with political influence. There is some overlap between the two, but the two are far from synonymous.
Not me, I answered about the 2 issues put by the previous poster..

Quote:
2. You conflate Western Europe with "the rest of the world".
Sure China is in western Europe ? Russia ? and I'd add that the previous poster used USA and Israel to say the UK had a bigger influence than France...

Quote:
3. You cite the number of US-based companies with a foothold in Paris as a singular index of global cultural/economic influence.
Absolutely not, I cite the number of french companies based in Paris and the british companies based in London... all of them being in the fortune 500, in other words, the ones having a real influence on the world...

Quote:
It's precisely London's financial and cultural role as mediator, arbiter and global hub for transactions, contracts and business deals pertaining to "off-shore" economies and businesses that classify it as having far greater global reach than Paris.
The business activity is as a whole bigger in Paris than in London, you can see it in all the studies made to rank the cities, also, I tend to believe the activity created by off-shore concerns only few people, the initiated ones... the insiders... it's not what we can call a global influence even if the number of destinations and the amounts of money is huge...


Quote:
I've looked through the WCCR reference you've provided and, if anything, the figures contradict your claim. Note some of the important indices:
Not really, it's just cherry pick, the claim made by valentro was the following : London being only slightly behind Paris on that. That's a draw.

Quote:
No. of international tourists: London 15,216,000; Paris 13,300,000.
• No. of night clubs, discos and dance halls: London 337, Paris 190
• No. of bars: London 2,143, Paris 3,350.
• No. of restaurants: 37,450; Paris 24,149.
• Visits to five most popular museums/galleries (million): London 25.3; Paris 23.4.
• Other heritage/historical sites: London 18,901; Paris 3,792.
• % public green space (parks and gardens): London 38.4%; Paris 9.4%.
By what kind of magic clubs are more important than theatres or music venues Actually, you just choose the criterias that pleased you and where London shines... it just shows your bad faith and no, my claim is clearly justified, and seeing the result of the study made by the mayor office who could say the opposite.

ALL THE CRITERIAS (I just keep the number that show the offers) in blue Paris and Red London.
Figure 2. Cultural heritage:
No. of national museums: London 11; Paris 24
No. of other museums: London 162; Paris 113.
No. of art galleries: London 857; Paris 1046


Figure 3 : Literature
No. of public libraries : London : 383 Paris : 830
No. of library book loans (million) : London : 37.2 Paris : 47
No. of bookshops : London 802 Paris :1025
No. of rare and second-hand bookshops : London : 68 Paris :282



Figure 4 : Films and games
No. of cinemas : London : 108 Paris:302
No. of cinema screens : London : 566 Paris : 1003
No. of films released theatrically in country : London : 557 Paris : 575
No. of film festivals : London : 61 Paris : 190
Attendance at most popular film festival : London : 132.000 Paris : 151.800

No. of video games arcades : London : 44 Paris : 14

Figure 5 : Performing arts
No. of theatres : London : 214 Paris : 353
No. of theatre performances : London 32.400 Paris : 26.000
No. of live music venues : London : 349 Paris : 423
No. of major concert : London : 10 Paris : 15
No. of music performances : London : 17000 Paris : 33000

No. of comedy performances : London : 11300 Paris : 10300
No. of dance performances : London : 2756 Paris : 3172
No. of non-professional dance schools : London : 618 Paris : 715


Figure 6 : People and talent
No. of specialist public cultural HE establishments :London : 11 Paris : 30
No. of specialist private cultural HE establishments :London : 46 Paris :73


Figure 7. Cultural vitality and diversity:
No. of night clubs, discos and dance halls: London 337, Paris 190
No. of bars: London 2,143, Paris 3,350.
No. of restaurants: London : 37,450; Paris 24,149.
No. of festivals/celebrations: London 254; Paris 360.
No. of international tourists: London 15,216,000[; Paris 13,300,000.
No. of international students: London 99,360; Paris 96,782.


So, according the mayor office, Paris, in terms of culture, has clearly more to offer than London...23-8 it's far to be a draw. As for the figures about tourism... well, I guess the mayor office certainly try hard to find a figure of tourism in Paris that is inferior to the one of London, it was just so easy to find the exact figure. Here is the official data coming from the mayor of Paris (I just wonder why the mayor office didn't take this one ) : 18 millions keep in mind that is just inner Paris... not the urban area, in other word, not Eurodisney, nor Versailles or other castles and monument around Paris....

Quote:
Note also the findings of similar analyses, such as Mastercard's "Global Top 20 Destination Cities by International Visitor Spending" [Mastercard, 2011:

1. London: 25.6bn [Billion USD]
2. New York: 20.3bn
3. Paris: 20.3bn
Great, everyone is using a mastercard, of course ! Seriously, UK receive each year 28 millions of tourist, PDF from the UNWTO (UN world tourism organisation) - page 6) and the expenditures made by international tourist in UK is : 35.9B$ in 2011 (France : 53.8)
And you are saying, thanks to Mastercard that the international tourist are spending 25,6 Bn$ only in London... Is your country empty at this point ???
BTW, at least mastercard knows there is 18 millions of international tourist in Paris page 5 on their PDF

Quote:
The Thomas Reuters reference you've provided identifies its key index of innovation as the capability of a large multinational company to "outperform the S&P 500 ... in market cap weighted revenue and add ... jobs". In other words, its criterion of innovation is defective, misleading and overly stringent.
you need to read the sources : "The Thomson Reuters 2012 Top 100 Global Innovator methodology is based on four principle criteria: overall patent volume, patent grant success rate, global reach of the portfolio and patent influence as evidenced by citations. The peer-reviewed methodology was executed using the Thomson Reuters Derwent World Patents Index® (DWPI), Derwent Patents Citations Index(TM), Quadrilateral Patent Index(TM), and Thomson Innovation®, the IP and intelligence collaboration platform. Comparative financial analysis was done using the Thomson Reuters Advanced Analytics for Deal-Making platform."

Quote:
Innovation, as the general public and the business world as a whole understands it, is a far more broadly inclusive term. Note, for example: New York, London and Toronto top list of world’s best cities for business, innovation and living – Quartz
in your thing, Paris is right behind Toronto... again, what a ****ing bad faith ! ! !
Paris is clearly a more innovative city than London, the number of lab, the number of patent, the number of people employed, the amount of money spend in R&D, and the number of successfull companies are in favor of Paris...

Quote:
Yet that is the problem with Paris. There is more to a city than its architecture, infrastructure, political and economic ties, its population and statistical indices. Some may refer to it as a synergism or a feeling that is intangible and often hard to define, and does not appear to be wholly subjective.
I mentioned this earlier, but however much I want to like Paris for its architectural beauty and charm, it falls short of the cultural dynamism, sophistication and vibrancy of New York City and London. There are some breath-takingly beautiful areas in Central Paris, but as a global city it is simply not in the same category as London.
I think the two videos below only slightly capture the difference in feel between the cities.
A video of Woody Allen to explain how Paris is boring ?
Actually, in the video of London it just shows how calm the city is... Paris looks more full of people in its shopping streets...

A city that has got the busiest train station in Europe, the largest metro station in the world, the biggest cluster in Europe, the largest cultural offer in the world, cannot be boring, you like it or not. If there is one thing that is sure, is that the londoner are actually arrogant, and think their city is the center of the universe whereas it is really hard for it to compete with Paris, and I'd say, if more studies was made between the urban area of Paris and greater London, anyone could see that actually London is behind Paris in almost all the field, of course excepted finance. So London to compete with NYC

But you can claim the opposite if you like it, I'm done here.
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Old 12-15-2012, 02:46 AM
 
250 posts, read 459,189 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rozenn View Post
Fortune global 500 companies are not necessarily US-based. These 30 companies obviously have their HQs Paris, which ranks 3rd below Tokyo and Beijing. Or does Crédit Agricole sound American to you?
Ranking in the Fortune 500 is determined by the US-based operations of specific companies, regardless of the country of origin. This is why they are listed specifically as US companies despite having headquarters elsewhere. Your argument is also oblivious to the key premise that it is misleading and fallacious to appeal to the number of companies in a city gauged by the measure of their presence within one country to argue for the global influence of said city.


Quote:
You're talking about a "fair comparisons" yet you post a sepia video featuring some retro music vs a video of busy shooping streets.
Your points of criticism are actually the positive merits of the video, and the city as whole, in fact. The embellishments merely reflect the charm of Paris and the nature of the footage itself. The quality of the footage is also superior. Ultimately, your complaint is unfounded, in that the same feel holds true regardless of where you point your camera, and however you decorate your video:


Rue de Rivoli:




Les Champs Elysées:



Walking Tour:


Last edited by Citizen401; 12-15-2012 at 02:58 AM..
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Old 12-15-2012, 05:33 AM
 
250 posts, read 459,189 times
Reputation: 350
Quote:
All I can see here is a problem of reading comprehension from you

Not me, I answered about the 2 issues put by the previous poster..

Sure China is in western Europe ? Russia ? and I'd add that the previous poster used USA and Israel to say the UK had a bigger influence than France...
I suggest you dispense with the ad hominem remarks.

Point 2 refers to the fact that you make a direct inference from the political isolation of the UK from the Eurozone to a negative measure of its global influence; which is inductively weak. As for point 1, if you are responding to Valentro's comment and not conflating politics and finance, then your comment is pragmatically incoherent or pointless. If you are conflating the two, then your argument is inductively weak. Scylla or Charybdis?

Note, also, how both of your arguments are unreasonable regardless of your subsequent statement that France enjoys good relationships with emerging economies.


Quote:
Absolutely not, I cite the number of french companies based in Paris and the british companies based in London... all of them being in the fortune 500, in other words, the ones having a real influence on the world...
Once again, note my comment carefully. Fortune 500 are companies listed in the US ranked according to their economic activities in the USA.


Quote:
The business activity is as a whole bigger in Paris than in London, you can see it in all the studies made to rank the cities, also, I tend to believe the activity created by off-shore concerns only few people, the initiated ones... the insiders... it's not what we can call a global influence even if the number of destinations and the amounts of money is huge...
Your first argument here is non-sequitur, and also not referenced. We are not discussing the amount of "business activity" in Paris as a whole, but about its role in transactions and business deals that concern matters that extend beyond its shores.

Your second argument is poorly substantiated and highly speculative.


Quote:
"Not really, it's just cherry pick, the claim made by valentro was the following : London being only slightly behind Paris on that. That's a draw."

"So, according the mayor office, Paris, in terms of culture, has clearly more to offer than London...23-8 it's far to be a draw. As for the figures about tourism..."
It's very simple: Valentro's comment references tourism as a means by which to rank cities according to leisure activity. You cited the WCCR report to claim that Paris was far ahead of London in this regard. The WCCR report showed the converse to be true. You were wrong.

The other figures aren't really necessary to disprove your claim. Ignoring your naively simplistic tallying of criteria, they show London has more restaurants, museums, clubs/discos, dance halls, theatre performances and a greater international presence; Paris has more art galleries, bookshops, cinemas, festivals and live entertainment venues.

Even ignoring the tourism data, these figures alone show that you are incorrect, by any objective measure, to claim that Paris is "far ahead" of London in leisure.


Quote:
"well, I guess the mayor office certainly try hard to find a figure of tourism in Paris that is inferior to the one of London, it was just so easy to find the exact figure. Here is the official data coming from the mayor of Paris (I just wonder why the mayor office didn't take this one ) : 18 millions keep in mind that is just inner Paris... not the urban area, in other word, not Eurodisney, nor Versailles or other castles and monument around Paris...."
You need to provide references that use a consistent methodology to show a comparative difference between Paris and London. Randomly cut-pasting independently derived figures from the internet is not a convincing way to press your point.


Quote:
"Great, everyone is using a mastercard, of course !" Seriously, UK receive each year 28 millions of tourist, PDF from the UNWTO (UN world tourism organisation) - page 6) and the expenditures made by international tourist in UK is : 35.9B$ in 2011 (France : 53.8)

"BTW, at least mastercard knows there is 18 millions of international tourist in Paris page 5 on their PDF"
1. We are discussing London and Paris, not UK and France.

2. The study data on cross-border expenditure is not exclusive to transactions made via Mastercard. Note appendix B for the study methodology. It appeals to UN audits/databases for estimates of traveller spending.

3. Page 5 of the report also shows London to have 20.1 million international visitors per annum, which is ahead of the figures for Paris (18.1 million).


Quote:
"you need to read the sources : "The Thomson Reuters 2012 Top 100 Global Innovator methodology is based on four principle criteria: overall patent volume, patent grant success rate, global reach of the portfolio and patent influence as evidenced by citations. The peer-reviewed methodology was executed using the Thomson Reuters Derwent World Patents Index® (DWPI), Derwent Patents Citations Index(TM), Quadrilateral Patent Index(TM), and Thomson Innovation®, the IP and intelligence collaboration platform. Comparative financial analysis was done using the Thomson Reuters Advanced Analytics for Deal-Making platform.""
If anything, this is actually somewhat worse than gauging innovation through financial performance.

Large multinational companies patent everything within their means as prophylactic and defensive measures against other companies. In many cases, the portfolios comprise vast quantities of arbitrarily simple and trivial intellectual properties, a good proportion of which end up completely unused. Note, for example, the legal wrangling around Apple's IOS:

Apple’s ridiculous patents « Big Orange Slide
DailyTech - Apple Patents Mobile Lists, Method to Make a Graphic Disappear; Plans More Suits
The 11 patents that are getting Android partners in trouble

Why do you think the Patent Office is completely snowed under and backlogged with applications from the corporate world? Patent volume and global reach of portfolio simply reflect company size and role. They are generally regarded to be very poor measures of innovation.

Citations indices fall prey to problems that beset every other similar index of their kind, such as the use of the H-index in academic specialties. They are poor indices of quality.


Quote:
"A video of Woody Allen to explain how Paris is boring ?"
1. The video isn't 'of' Woody Allen.

2. I'm not intending to show Paris to be "boring". Note my comment very carefully.

Last edited by Citizen401; 12-15-2012 at 07:03 AM..
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Old 12-15-2012, 06:28 AM
 
Location: Near Tours, France about 47°10'N 0°25'E
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Citizen401 View Post
Yet that is the problem with Paris. There is more to a city than its architecture, infrastructure, political and economic ties, its population and statistical indices. Some may refer to it as a synergism or a feeling that is intangible and often hard to define, and does not appear to be wholly subjective.

I mentioned this earlier, but however much I want to like Paris for its architectural beauty and charm, it falls short of the cultural dynamism, sophistication and vibrancy of New York City and London. There are some breath-takingly beautiful areas in Central Paris, but as a global city it is simply not in the same category as London.

I think the two videos below only slightly capture the difference in feel between the cities.

Beautiful Paris:



Shopping in Central London:


I don't find those videos to be really representative of the reality, but more to the image you want.
In London's video, it seems to have been taken almost only around the ultra-shopping area Picadilly/regent street/Oxford street.
We do almost not even see the typically red brick architecture that makes much of the city. I don't think regent street represent the architectural spirit of the town, I see it more like an exception, in both architectural style and human activity.

Every time I've been to London I was surprised that I didn't find much of that so-called Londoner "vibrancy" (don't really understand in what it does precisely consist) which is supposed to make London a so-dynamic city. I'm sorry but I never felt that London was so animated as you wish it be; actually in no way more than Paris, and obviously much less than New York and Tokyo. Each time I'm suprised that in central London feels so empty and quiet as soon as the communters left. To me Central London is a communter place, which means that it feels animated in shopping places (Oxford or regent streets) and in business places (the city, the docklands); but surpisingly feels very quiet after 17h when people have returned to their terrassed-houses homes. Inversely central Paris is heavily populated (with a density that is found in Europe only in mediterranean cities, as Naples or Barcelona).

It seem that you Londoners are still think we are in the 19th century when London was the world biggest capital and leading of the world, I'm sorry but that is not the case anymore. London is not even the leading city of the Anglo world (NewYork is way ahead of London)

Inversely your Paris videos seems tp have been shoosen to reinforce the common stereotype that many people from Anglo cultures have about Paris: "Paris is just a quiet and beautiful, quaint picturesquesque city".
While it is true that many part of Paris historical center has a "quaint feel"; Paris canno't be resumed to that touristic cliché at all, especially showed with videos made probably in the early morning or during vacations when Parisian left the city.
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Old 12-15-2012, 06:41 AM
 
Location: Paris
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Citizen401 View Post
Ranking in the Fortune 500 is determined by the US-based operations of specific companies, regardless of the country of origin. This is why they are listed specifically as US companies despite having headquarters elsewhere. Your argument is also oblivious to the key premise that it is misleading and fallacious to appeal to the number of companies in a city gauged by the measure of their presence within one country to argue for the global influence of said city.
Geez we're talking about the GLOBAL ranking, and it's not determined by the US-based operations of the companies. Where did you see that?
Global 500 - FAQ, Definitions and Explanations - Fortune



Quote:

Your points of criticism are actually the positive merits of the video, and the city as whole, in fact. The embellishments merely reflect the charm of Paris and the nature of the footage itself. The quality of the footage is also superior. Ultimately, your complaint is unfounded, in that the same feel holds true regardless of where you point your camera, and however you decorate your video:


Rue de Rivoli:


Les Champs Elysées:

Walking Tour:
The quality of the Paris video may be better, it's irrelevant in this discussion. I was just pointing that you were comparing apples to oranges. And apart from the Champs-Elysees, the other videos are from touristy areas with little shopping venues.

Instead of the western part, you may have posted a video of the eastern end of rue de Rivoli, by the same person:
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